where the wild things are

I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people…They leave me and I love them more…What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world…
—  Maurice Sendak, Where the Wild Things Are

I love children’s books, but I get that not everyone does. That said, I came across two August books in the mail pile that take a critical (and, yes, more grown-up) approach to kids lit. Was The Cat In The Hat Black? by Philip Nel explores at the hidden racism behind popular children’s books, and Wild Things by Bruce Handy provides context and analysis for childhood classics like Little House on the Prairie, The Giving Tree and Goodnight Moon.

If you ARE into picture books, Chelsea Marshall and Mary Dauterman just published a satirical one for adults called  What Are We Even Doing With Our Lives?

Had to include this interior image – because public radio and tote bags:

- Sydnee

Images: Oxford University Press,  Simon & Schuster, Dey Street Books.

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Where the Wild Things Are.

“Children are tough, though we tend to think of them as fragile. They have to be tough. Childhood is not easy. We sentimentalize children, but they know what’s real and what’s not. They understand metaphor and symbol. If children are different from us, they are more spontaneous. Grown-up lives have become overlaid with dross.”  - Maurice Sendak