whatever it looks cool

2

I’m fine staying a slowpoke forever but if I were to meet a real nice shellder I wouldn’t be opposed to evolving with them! Real cute and sweet, like us!
@daily-deino

A thought: Modern flinthamilton AU in which Alfred is still a homophobic douchebag but they went ‘fuck you’ and got married anyway.

I call this “Thomas I don’t think your husband is listening to a single word you say…… he’s… distracted”

8

When you told me to contemplate the world, what did you expect me to picture in my mind? A map? Some floaty cosmic energy? You know what I actually did see? Katara, Sokka and Toph. I saw the Kyoishi Warriors, The White Lotus, the monks who raised me, and I saw Zuko. I don’t know how to “contemplate the world” without first thinking of the people I care about. Including Zuko.

if you are thinking of putting ॐ (aum or om) somewhere on your body as a tattoo, please only do it if it has a significant meaning to you. it is very sacred and important to my religion (buddhism) and many others. i would really appreciate it if you would take that into consideration before just putting it on your body because it looks Aesthetic™. if you do find peace with it and its meaning then by all means have it as a permanent reminder on your skin. but please don’t ink it to your body or wear jewellery with the symbol just because you think it looks nice and think that it is fashionable.

tell the boy on the left thanks for not killing the boy on the right  ✌

anonymous asked:

i just started using watercolors, can you tell me about your process/share some tips?

Well first of all, congrats on trying watercolors! I’m by no means an expert yet but I’ll do my best to walk you through my process using some of the WIP pictures I have from previous pieces. There’s a ton to cover and I won’t get it all so feel free to ask more specific questions if you need help. 

My first tip would be to play with whatever tools you have to figure out what feels right for you. If you don’t have any tools yet, I suggest the Sakura Koi Pocket Field Sketch Box (pictured below) since it’s really nice quality, comes with a water brush, and usually costs like $15-$25 depending on size/where you buy it. If that’s still outside of your price range, the first watercolors I ever did were with old crayola palettes and it worked out fine, it just took way more layers and time to get the color depth I wanted.

As for paper, I’m still looking for the perfect one but just make sure it’s watercolor paper (cold press means there’s a texture, hot press is smooth) or multimedia and not like, printer paper. As long as it’s relatively thick, it should be ok but might buckle when too much water is added.

Don’t worry too much about perfection when learning how to use your equipment. Make lines, blend colors, try making washes, etc. When I came back to watercolors, I mostly did a lot of meditative painting, where I doodled whatever felt right. Some of them even came out real cool looking?? 

When I sit down to do a more detailed piece or commission, I have a five-part process I pretty consistently use these days. It goes like this: 

1) Traditional (or digital) sketch/concept phase. The below pic is from a pop-art commission concept where I really liked the flow of her hair.

2) Digital lineart (cleaning up/refining concept sketches)

3) Print the lineart and lightbox it to watercolor paper using either a hard graphite pencil (very light lines) or colored lead. I still lightbox with this ancient hunk of junk but you can even use a window or your computer screen (VERY CAREFULLY) to lightbox if you don’t have one. 

Here’s what some of my pieces looks like after being transferred: 

I think it’s important to note that you should keep a piece of scrap paper under your hand while working on the watercolor paper, since the oils in your skin can lead to areas where the paint won’t bind to the paper properly. I’ve had cases where I finished a background wash only to find an absolutely perfect thumbprint in the center of it. 

4) Ink the lines. Make sure your pens are waterproof. If they’re not, I’ll talk about a way to get around that later so skip right to painting for now. 

I used micron technical pens for the above piece. If you don’t know if you have waterproof pens, make a test chart like the one below. Mine involved copics, watercolor, and super heavy scrubbing to see how easily the pen came off when wet. 

I’ve also “inked” after painting by using more concentrated lines of watercolor instead of actual ink. The below painting was too cute and pastel and I didn’t want to ruin it with black lines, so I used that technique here (along with some red pencil)

5) Paint! I’m not really consistent with this step but my main tip is: BE PATIENT! If you want flat blocks of color, wait until each wash is fully dry before moving on to one next to it. If you don’t, they’ll bleed into each other. This is also true when trying to create shadows with hard edges instead of soft blending. Not being patient enough is my #1 cause of “crap I have to start this over”.

(The weird coloration on the lines above is actually dried frisket I put over certain sections of the piece to protect them but it ended up being more of a hassle than anything else for this style of piece.)

So, what if you didn’t have waterproof pens? You can easily reverse steps 4&5 and paint first, wait for it to dry very well, and then ink (shown below). 

The finished piece looked like this: 

I hope this was helpful!

If you want to see any of my WIPs/ask me questions, you can find me on Twitter and Instagram

Also, my commission slots are open and if you like my work and want to leave me a tip, you can always buy me a coffee :)

[march study challenge] • 12/03/17

Day 12: favourite quote

I’m posting twice just because this is one of my favourite quotes too. If I’m honest, I don’t like some of the overly embellished quotes because that makes it even harder to pick, so this one is great. You’ve got this - short and sweet. You really have got this, and I’m confident that you’ll kick butt in whatever you have to achieve this week - look at this cool cactus telling you that you will.

She’s a sweetheart! She said, “Let’s do it!” And I’m like, “I’m ready!” First of all, I always wanted to see her show. I was in Miami, and she opened the door, and I said, “Of course, let’s have fun.” She goes, “Rick, I’ve always wanted to sing ‘Livin’ La Vida Loca.’ Can we do it?” I’m like, “Okay, we’ll do whatever you want.” And she looked so beautiful and sexy. She was so cool. It was a very special night. I was flattered to be part of the team.
—  Ricky Martin on performing with Taylor Swift on her 1989 tour stop in Miami and what’s it like being in the squad (People.com, November 2015)

anonymous asked:

1,18,&19????

1. “Oh my God. You’re in love with her.”

a/n: whoop whoop some college shawn comin @ ya


“So, uh, what’s been going on with you and Y/n?” Brian asks Shawn from across the pingpong table. The boys were never ones to get deep or gush like girls, but after the way Shawn had been attached at the him to you lately, someone had to ask him about it. 

“Nothin’ man, she’s just really cool and funny.” Shawn brushes off, smacking the ball back to Brian, but missing the table completely. 

“Yeah, okay. Whatever you say, man.” Brian teases. 


Keep reading

nct dream and their fashion sense

Mark: dresses well, fr he ends up looking like one of those guys from highschool musical

Renjun: wears whatever, doesn’t care, as long as he’s comfortable he don’t give two s****

Jeno: like Renjun also wears comfortable clothes, just less colourful, hoodies, greys, blacks

Haechan: wears whatever the f*** he wants, doesn’t give two s**** either, but matches clothes together well

Chenle: anime shirts, merch clothes, whatever looks cool tbh

Jaemin: wears brand names, dresses in sporty, comfortable clothes, pays attention to how he dresses

Jisung: wears all black because he’s ‘old’ and 'cool’

Remember when someone from the crew, I can’t remember who, said smth along the lines of “we don’t put too much thought into our design choices, we just do whatever looks cool” as time goes on it becomes increasingly evident how true that is for literally everything

defendthechibi  asked:

I'm a beginner in Chinese and having a hard time finding out where to start. What would you recommend?

@defendthechibi: mmmmdamn. ok, so Chinese is not a lang I approached on my own, I started in a class, but with that said here’s some combination of how that went down and what I would suggest (if you are a self-learner of Chinese pls do add):

1. Get a fucking fantastic foundation in pinyin and tones. I cannot emphasize this enough—start good habits now or it’ll be really terrible to find out no one understands you because you were like “tone, I’ll come back to that!” Here is a very nice pinyin chart with literally every syllable combination recorded with every tone. Here’s a pinyin practice game. If you can get someone who already speaks Mandarin to help that’s of course ideal, especially for the retroflex sounds, but not essential. Either way make sure you practice speaking aloud. Here’s a funny tone explanation that’s secretly great.

2. Pick a book and stick with it. So this is not Mandarin-specific, but I find that self-learners (myself included) have a habit of starting like three different texts for one language and it’s a mess. Decide if you wanna start with traditional or simplified characters, then pick a textbook, it wont be perfect because nothing is, and maybe just a grammar book for reference. We used Integrated Chinese in class, but I don’t know that I’d recommended it for soloing, Practice Makes Perfect has great other books I’ve used and seems like a better choice. This series is good grammar help, and so is Modern Mandarin Chinese grammar (pdf). When looking for textbooks I recommend reading reviews and also taking into consideration the time/pace you want to work at. Learning a language is a lifetime thing so really you just gotta start somewhere and plow ahead. (also check what the library has!)

2.5 Don’t buy those damn books of character lists. I’m sure you’ve seen them, “memorizing hanzi!” “500 common characters!” whaaaatever. Whatever textbook yr using will tell you what characters you need right then, and if that’s not enough there are plenty of frequency lists online. More importantly, do learn the radicals When it comes to actually getting characters into your brain it’s some combination of mnemonic device (which works better if you make it up, not if some rando writer does anyway) and rote muscle memory—so all you need is paper. Get square/grid paper and pay attention to proportions or if you must get a book, get one that has practice space. Skritter is amazing and wonderful and I cannot praise it enough but also it is not free. But like if yr really serious you’ll probably have to put some money down somewhere. Whatever you do, do not buy Chineasy it is a plague upon our language learning household. (note: some people suggest not learning characters until after awhile of studying spoken. That sounds sort of terrible to me, and it also means you won’t be able to engage with anything Chinese online. But it is a thing, and sites like YablaFluentU, and ChinesePod could be a way to go [and are good anyway])

3. Practice, practice, practice! Ok cool you started doing some stuff! Check you out! If you want to get feedback start posting snippets on Lang-8, you can even meet people to skype with. Or if you want (and have a smart phone) you can get a chat buddy on hellotalk. Maybe there’s a meetup group in your area who knows. Make yourself/download an Anki deck, etc. etc. Just try to always do a little something everyday. I think because of characters Chinese has a particularly steep learning curve—I still can’t open a webpage and just like read it—so it might be better to focus on practicing what you know rather than trying to engage too much with “actual” Chinese. That said….

4. Don’t loose hope, find fun things in Chinese. Even if it’s not actively practicing your language skills, find ways to enjoy Chinese that don’t drain you like too much studying will. Listen to music,  read about idiomswatch movies, or if you’re a nerd like me, read about Chinese linguistics! If you have a hobby, you can find stuff on your hobby in Chinese. e.g. here is a whole cooking channel that is also subbed in English.  DramaFever has, duh, lots of dramas, but is not free. 

I hope that sounds like a setup for success! Here’s some dictionaries: MDGB, HanziCraft, lineDict (let’s you draw characters). If you have a smartphone get Pleco. Here’s a thing that annotates text & has rollover translation: MandarinSpot (maybe get a plug-in if yr into those). Here are general help sites: SayJACK  & Chinese Grammar Wiki. There are so so so many other resources out there, but rather than stockpile them all right now I think it’s better to focus on whatever textbook/system you chose and just start moving. Once you have a little more of a base then look for cool blogs or whatever works well for YOU. 

If there was something more specific you wanted just throw that @ me. If people have suggestions you can send them in and I’ll compile them so we don’t have to reblog this massive thing  くコ:彡  くコ:彡  くコ:彡 

1170 Talents

Here’s a link to a list of 1,170 potential SHSL Talents.

In a skype chat, we figured there were 78 classes at Hope’s Peak by canon time, and if they had approximately 16 students in each class, minus the 78 SHSL Good Lucks there would be 1,170 titles. Now, it’s stated on the DR3 wiki that the SHSL Student Body President is the only one to ever share a talent. How many other talents could there possibly be?

And so, we made a list of potential ideas. Canon talents are listed at the top, and our own ideas are underneath (we forgot DR0, so those talents are somewhere among the main list).

If you’re a DR OC roleplayer, or want to make a fanstory, or just want to look at a list of cool talents for whatever reason, please feel free to use this for reference! A fun game to play is to randomize a number and make an OC with whatever talent you get. Have fun!

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