what women like

Daily #1,603! Today was overwhelmingly inspiring, and honestly the least alone I’ve felt about being a woman who codes since I first learned how over ten years ago.

It says a lot about the fandom’s priorities where the biggest f/f ship is judged harshly and treated like the shipping version of Hester Prynne, but the two largest ships supported by fujoshis doesn’t get the same amount of scrutiny and treatment.

3

Our Current (2/15/17) Women’s Champions

the First Japanese woman to become the NXT Women’s Champion

the First African American woman to become the Smackdown Women’s Champion

the First Latina woman to become the Raw Women’s Champion

anonymous asked:

"Men want objects. Women want PEOPLE." You REALLY need to stop hanging out within your confirmation bias bubble man. It's starting to like seriously fuck with your objectivity. If you can't see how sexist generalizing all men as being assholes while saying all women are decent and morally superior, you've seriously lost yourself. You need to take some time to think (I'm legitimately worried here, this is not trolling, I'm seriously concerned for your mental well being).

You do realize that I’m a cis man, right? And that I reblogged that post from another cis man?
Why is it that we can read something like that and fully comprehend that this wasn’t about us and you can’t?

That being said: my mental well-being is not at stake, fear not.

Duder, if you honestly believe that I’m of the mindset that ANY particular brand of person is better than another you probably have not actually held a conversation with me.
We can change that, though! My askbox is open if you’d like to something other than put me on blast!
Feel free to hit me up! or if you really feel threatened the “Unfollow” button is but a point-and-click away!

9

Bette Davis // Judy Garland // Joan Crawford // Marilyn Monroe // Audrey Hepburn // Barbra Streisand // Angela Lansbury // Natalie Wood // Vivien Leigh

Loving a strong, independent woman is not for the faint of heart…
You need to be self-assured and confident in your own masculinity because she will not fawn over you to give you constant gratification or cry down the phone to you begging to see you because she misses you… She is not the type to ask for your help or advice on how best to do something, so if you’re in love your own opinions and the sound of your own voice then this isn’t the woman for you.
She is spirited and confident and will embark upon projects and adventures without consulting you; you can either tag along for the ride or not, it makes no difference to her. So if you need to be in control of every decision in a relationship it’s best you call it quits now… She’s not a perfectionist or a control freak, in fact you’ll find her both reasonable and forgiving - but she’s also nobody’s fool so if repeating the same behavior and apologizing every time is the most amount of effort you’re willing to put into the relationship she won’t keep you around very long…
But the joy in loving a strong independent woman is knowing that if she chooses you it’s because she loves you – NOT because she needs you. A woman like that learned to rely on herself and stop needing people a long time ago so if she’s with you it’s because she admires and respects you for who you are as a person and not for what you can offer her. If you’re a man who can truly handle being a woman’s equal… then you just might be man enough for a woman like her….

anonymous asked:

You said its much more interesting to have a character try to fit into their role and fail then a princess character who automatically rebels. Can you tell me more about it and what makes it interesting? I really like your insight when it comes to stories and fairytales.

Ah! Thank you! Well, I really dislike the ‘Rebellious Princess’ narrative for three reasons, and I’ll just go into them below before talking about more interesting approaches

  1. It’s Classist

This is the most obvious issue. Your hero is a rebel princess, born into a life of status and privilege. She is the 1%.

You remember this comic making its rounds on social media? 

Your rebel Princess is Richard.

Every time the Princess laments that she’s trapped by her own wealth and status, she ignores the fact that her problems are minute and petty in the grander narrative. Princesses are inherently privileged, and it’s ignorant to ignore their own wealth in favour of chasing some bohemian ‘freedom’. 

We get it, kiddo. You hate needlework and you don’t want to be Queen. But your kingdom is in the middle ages, people eat dirt and no one is happy. The Princess might yearn for some vague concept of ‘something more’, but that’s myopic and selfish when her people yearn for electricity and proper sanitation. 

I have extreme difficulty enjoying Star vs the Forces of Evil.

2. It pits the hero against other women to make her rebellion look good. 

So you have your Princess who rejects the institution of traditional femininity. All well and good. But in order for her to be rebellious, there must be an institution in the first place for her to reject.

Enter The Institution. Call her St Olga’s Reform School for Wayward Princesses, call her Prudence, or Marina Del Rey. No matter what she looks or acts like, you know you’ve seen her before. She’s prudish, traditionally feminine, tough as nails, and probably sews her own ballgowns on her weekends off. 

She is a perfectly good woman in any other sense, but since she’s everything your princess doesn’t want to be, conflict has to arise from the princess fighting her and her ideals. 

And of course, the princess will win, because traditional femininity is evil. 

Oh, Prudence, you deserved so much more than the Disney Sequel you got.

In a feminist world there’s nothing wrong with fighting old ideas of what women should act like - but in a postmodern feminist world, one must be aware that some women willingly are quite happy to be traditionally feminine, and some don’t have the luxury of choice to pick whatever kind of femininity they embody.

Pitting the ‘feminist’ rebel princess against traditionally feminine women is a microaggression in itself: we have never needed to sell men an empowerment narrative by pitting men against each other, so why start here? Also note that Disney is extremely fond of this, especially in marketing Frozen and its reboot movies by saying it’s better than ‘classic princess’ movies because ‘classic princesses’ needed men:

“That’s a bit different from the animation, I think, it’s not about Cinderella just being rescued by a man.”  

3. It’s a White-Feminist narrative. 

Oh GOD is it a White-Feminist narrative!

I said before that some woman don’t have the luxury to be rebel princesses, and some willingly want to be traditionally femme. This is especially so in POC cultures. 

In Chinese culture, the concept of filial piety is a very important one: to be dutiful and respectful to your parents, and placing your family’s honour and their values above your own. 

Mulan does not have the luxury of ‘rebellion’. Rebellion would dishonour her family, rebellion would shame her parents. Mulan’s entire character arc exists to teach her to balance her parent’s needs with her own, and it ends with her bestowing her war prizes to her father - at the height of her own glory she doesn’t forget where she came from - and it’s the greatest show of honour she could possibly give.

To turn Mulan into a rebel princess would be to undermine everything her culture and the folklore surrounding her represents. A lot of these themes are repeated in Moana - how much of yourself do you give up to make your parents happy? What is the true meaning of tradition? When you exist for other people can you still know who you are? 

Originally posted by tarajis

Moana is great. Watch it. 

Making White Feminist statements like ‘my princesses isn’t like a classic princess! she feminist and doesnt need to listen to anyone!’ does a massive disservice to other cultures who have to balance force of will with filial piety. 

So, about those Interesting Narratives…

Originally posted by a-dark-and-terrible-thing

Pans Labyrinth (2006) is thematically about ‘rebellion’ - it’s set in the Spanish Civil War and half of its narrative is about fighting a military dictatorship. It’s other half is about Ofelia (a fairy changeling), who is given instructions so that she can return to the magical world. Ofelia proceeds to mess all of them up: she eats from a magical table when she’s told to take no food, she refuses to kill an infant to open a gate to her homeworld. While excited to be a princess, Ofelia struggles to cope with the morally dubious or downright strange demands she’s presented with. Her rebellion isn’t a girl with a weapon in her hand: it’s a girl who legitimately wants to be a princess but isn’t cruel enough to do what it takes to get there.  

I wanted to give others - and they are plenty - but this post has gone on long enough. ;w; Do come back to me if you want to know more, anon! I’m overjoyed to be able to talk about this!

buzzfeed.com
This Is What International Women's Day Looked Like Around The World
Women rallied in cities around the world to make their voices heard on issues including equal pay, immigration, health care, and sexual violence.
By Claudia Koerner

Brasilia, Brazil

Evaristo Sa / AFP / Getty Images

Los Angeles

Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images

Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images

Buenos Aires

Juan Mabromata / AFP / Getty Images

Juan Mabromata / AFP / Getty Images

Washington, DC

Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images

Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images

Nicholas Kamm / AFP / Getty Images

Guatemala City, Guatemala

Johan Ordonez / AFP / Getty Images

Pamplona, Spain

Alvaro Barrientos / AP

Lima, Peru

Ernesto Benavides / AFP / Getty Images

New York

Bebeto Matthews / AP

Kathy Willens / AP

Montevideo, Uruguay

Matilde Campodonico / AP

Sanaa, Yemen

Hani Mohammed / AP

San Salvador, El Salvador

Marvin Recinos / AFP / Getty Images

Marvin Recinos / AFP / Getty Images

Athens

Eleftherios Elis / AFP / Getty Images

Istanbul

Chris Mcgrath / Getty Images

Ozan Kose / AFP / Getty Images

New Delhi, India

Dominique Faget / AFP / Getty Images

Money Sharma / AFP / Getty Images

Brussels

Siska Gremmelprez / AFP / Getty Images

Lviv, Ukraine

Yuriy Dyachyshyn / AFP / Getty Images

Hong Kong

Anthony Wallace / AFP / Getty Images

Toulouse, France

Remy Gabalda / AFP / Getty Images

Diyarbakir, Turkey

Ilyas Akengin / AFP / Getty Images

Manila

Ted Aljibe / AFP / Getty Images

Melbourne, Australia

Daniel Pockett / Getty Images

Daniel Pockett / Getty Images

Daniel Pockett / Getty Images

Hyderabad, India

Noah Seelam / AFP / Getty Images

Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Ulet Ifansasti / Getty Images

Live Updates: Women Around The World Are Taking The Day Off To Demonstrate For Women’s Rights

This is it. This is the best headline yet.