what was the point of that when he just got given the power to defeat ozai

There’s no way for Azula to know Aang was still alive after she shot him with the lightning blast, until she suspected Zuko’s behaviour when he was feeding the turtle-duckes in the Fire Nation and figure it out here.

“So, I didn’t capture the Avatar,”

“Who cares?“ Azula asks. “The Avatar is dead.”

Zuko looks away.

He still doesn’t know how to cover himself. (In the lying sort of way. He seems to have mastered the clothing sort of way, unfortunately.) Azula, being as sharp as she is (sharp enough to sink an empire class battleship), picks up on his caginess immediately. “Unless you think he somehow miraculously survived…” she coaxes. Zuko knows about the spirit oasis water.

And he also knows how slippery Aang is, plus he seems to have some sort of strange psychic connection to Aang, perhaps the very thing that allowed them to fight in tandem so well in The Blue Spirit, so this is why he has a nagging feeling that Aang isn’t dead.

“No, there’s no way he could have survived,” Zuko says assuredly to Azula. But Azula sees straight through his lies. They stare each other down for few minutes.

“Well, then I’m sure you have nothing to worry about,” Azula responds. He holds his own against her in that, but he’s already shown his hand, unfortunately for him. This is a warning for him, but he doesn’t pick up on it.

Azula leaves.

This proves that the person who was suspected the Avatar might still alive is Zuko, not Azula. And his suspicions extended to her.

What would be the point of this scene if Azula was already know the truth? If she was know the truth already, then this scene is vain- hole plot. There’s no point of them talking about the possibility of Aang’s survival. The writers would’ve cancel this whole conversation, and skip til to “bedroom scene” where Azula suspicing the Avatar may still alive.

This is the key. And more of what even mentioned in the canon book “Earth Kingdom: Chronicles: The Tale of Azula”

(This Tale told by Azula’s perspective. The book written by Michael Teitelbaum, one of the writers who create her character)

She actually planned to GIVE Zuko credit for taking down the Avatar BEFORE she suspected that the Avatar was alive. Proof of this is when the siblings were introduced by Li and Lo; Azula was given credit for taking down Ba Sing Se, but NOT for taking down the Avatar. At that point, she believed the Avatar dead and yet did not claim credit; she had not yet asked Zuko about the Avatar possibly being alive. This was her way of showing her thanks to Zuko for coming back to her.

Ozai: “I am proud of you, Prince Zuko. I am proud because you and your sister conquered Ba Sing Se. I am proud because when your loyalty was tested by your treacherous uncle, you did the right thing and captured the traitor. And I am proudest of all of your most legendary accomplishment: you slayed the Avatar.”

We know that Azula isn’t nice enough to give Zuko the glory out of the goodness of her heart, but we don’t know what she’s up to, just like he doesn’t know. We of course find out that she was protecting herself, so she wouldn’t be shamed if it ever came out that the Avatar wasn’t really dead. But she could have told Ozai that Zuko killed the Avatar without mentioning his “power” and “ferocity”. Those words of compliments. Azula did do a lot of smiling during that battle. She also emphasizes a separation between Zuko and Iroh, with Iroh as the traitor, and Zuko as the loyalist who proved himself. That much had to have been for Zuko’s benefit.

Iroh is considered too far gone to be redeemed in Ozai’s eyes, and Azula views him the same way.

But Zuko is a failure, and he gets two options: being dragged home where he’ll no longer embarrass Ozai, as said by Azula in Book 2, Episode 1, OR he could restore his own honor by joining forces with Azula, which would get him his “honor” back, again a summary of the things Azula tells him in Book 2, Episode 20. Long story short, he either gets to get locked in a basement to no longer embarrass dad, or to prove for once and for all that he’s not a failure.

The fact remains that Azula gave Zuko a chance to do the latter. And she didn’t do it because she thought she nedeed a scapegoat, how could she have known Aang might have survived until that conversation with her brother by the turtle-duck pond? Until then she’s absolutely convinced Aang is dead. She snaps at Zuko, until she finally asks if he thinks he might have miraculously survived. Zuko hesitates, then says no. Azula can tell something’s not right, and she says that in that case he has nothing to worry about. In that case. In that case. [x]

▪At the bedroom scene:

“You have another motive for doing this,” Zuko accuses. “I just haven’t figured out what it is.”“What ulterior motive could I have? What could I possibly gain by letting you get all of the glory for defeating the Avatar?““…Unless, somehow, the Avatar was still alive,” she finally says. See: she told him the truth. It’s not as if he had her cornered – she chose to tell him the truth, probably to help him out a little. Now, she might have thrown him under the bus a little here, but he sort of had it coming: she asked him if it was possible that the Avatar was still alive, and he denied it. We’ll never know what might have happened if he had told the truth at Ba Sing Se or the pond. And he could have told the truth when he was with his father, but he didn’t. And maybe Azula did him a favor, because it’s possible that Ozai would not have accepted Zuko back if he did not think that Zuko had been the one to take care of the Avatar problem. We can’t know that either.

“All that glory would suddenly turn to shame and foolishness,” she points out with menace, taking her hand off of his shoulder and walking back to her bed.

“But you said yourself that was impossible,” Azula points out thereby justifying herself.

He’s still angry at her duplicity, but he certainly realizes that he got himself into this position, and he’s trying to figure out how he can fix things.

In the Beach, Azula even offered to help Zuko with his internal turmoil. She showed compassion and a willingness to help him with his mental struggle, even going so far as to decrease her value in the eyes of her father so that Zuko could have what he dreamed of.

Azula is not as bad as you think (or as some hope). Her helping her brother at Ba Sing Se was completely selfless.

When Zuko defects from the Fire Nation she felt angry. His leaving also throws her priorities into doubt, when he begins to succeed without meeting, or even trying to meet, the standards set by their father. But she wasn’t truly unnerved until she’s followed by the of betrayal of Mai and Ty lee.



Azula may act cold and cruel with Zuko sometimes, she also do care about him sometimes too. Her feelings toward him are complex and variable.

As long as some people not using fan-made stuff as arguments in serious discussions such as have a tendency to defy all logic and to try to flatten her character and her complexities by “fortuneteller!Azula” headcanon who would know that Aang would survive the lighting blast. then I have no reason to assure this point at the end of “Book 2: Earth”. You should know better than to twist things around just to belittle her good side..