what up queen

Part of my Swan Prince Victuuri!AU !!!! And I still don’t know what I’m doing !!! Yuuri finds an injured swan in the woods?? Stay tuned for what happens next (maybe) !!!

Bonus:

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I am a girl who loves my island/And the girl who loves the sea, it calls me/I am the daughter of the village chief/We are descended from voyagers/Who found their way across the world/They call me

I am Moana!

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So, back in October I started this comic. It was going to be a look into my headcannon for Medic’s past, well, at least a part of it.  But then I started ask-the-itsy-bitsy-spyder and my free time for art is spent there.

But if you guys would be interested in the continuation and would want to see it, let me know!

If I tell her [Emma] what I did, she’s not gonna want to marry me.
— 

H00k

When I heard this line I literally burst out laughing. Of she’s going to marry you H00k (whether she stays married to him by the end of the season is anyone’s guess)! Obviously attempting to murder the family she spent years searching for wasn’t enough to deter her from being with you so why should killing a grandfather she never met take marriage off the table? So you lied to her by omission, it’s not like you haven’t lied to her many times before, what’s one more time? She was able to sweep all of that under the rug without so much as breaking a sweat so I don’t think there’s too much worse you can do. For some reason she still insists on being with you despite how much of a bunghole you are so I don’t think you’re going to have any problems. Lol, who do these people think they’re trying to fool with this faux angst with C$. 

@ouat 

Cuz you’re not fooling anyone, except C$/H00k fans that’s not very hard to do.

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thank you bones week day 2: eleven temperance brennan character growth moments
- Brennan’s journey to believing in love is by far my favourite. From not believing in love at all, and merely calling it a chemical process. To being jealous of her friends who believe love transcends science and reason. To then finally realising she loves Booth. She’s come such a long way. And she finally has the love she deserved all a long.

SINCE SHE WAS SO BEAUTIFUL I HAD TO coughstrycoughs REDRAW IT ◟(◔ั₀◔ั )◞ ༘♡

May Kirishima Touka be always with us, amen.

satans-armchair replied to your post“I looove Chaol and I agree he gets a shit ton of hate for no reason!…”

I think it’s vital that there’s a character that needs to grow to accept. It shows that not everyone is born accepting and it gives Chaol the massive opportunity for character development. Even if he doesn’t fully accept Aelin, he loved her and she will always have a space in his heart whether he comes to terms with what she is. I kinda don’t want it to be just “Chaol understands Aelin is okay and accepts her” I want it more steady and slow and meaningful if you get me?

I don’t understand why he gets so much hate either :/ I didn’t really like him because DORIAN but he is such a cool character and I want to know more about where he’s from and his family and his relationship with everyone he’s such a good man to his guards

Okay, okay I agree, I do, I really do but like…okay this is a point I’ve been wanting to make for a while so bear with me (I’m not going to get involved in the discourse Lauren said, Lauren lied) but Chaol is not the only one who has to change and grow with regards to his feelings towards fae and magic?  

Aelin reflects in ToG that it’s maybe for the best that her magic/magic in general is gone. Pretty much her entire arc in HoF revolves around HER not being able to accept that part of herself. That’s one of the biggest reasons she can’t shift/fully access her power - she’s afraid of it; which is natural after all the propaganda she’s been exposed to? 

Dorian too is terrified of his power because of what he’s been told/taught/the society they live in. He spends a huge amount of time fighting it, trying to control it, terrified of it. It takes them both a long time to accept their magic and themselves and they both spend pretty much an entire book coming to terms with it? 

Chaol has to figure out the same things too except he doesn’t have the benefit of actually possessing magic himself? He has no firsthand experience with it but he still spends all of HoF helping…both Aelin and Dorian deal with their magic? He helps Dorian in trying to find a way to free it/hide him better…and he ensures that Aelin can get to Wendelyn where she’ll be safe/won’t be executed if she’s caught because of what she is. 

I also think…and idk I don’t know if anyone else reads it this way so maybe i’m way off the mark but I think people misunderstand Chaol’s reactions towards Aelin in QoS? It is not just because of her magic/her fae heritage (he accepts Dorian’s magic, he accepts Aedion, and he works well with Rowan too) the problem is not what she is/that she has these things…it’s what she does with them. 

Like, okay, picture things from Chaol’s POV for a second? We as readers know exactly what happened in Wendelyn, we know Maeve is a piece of work and we know that Aelin didn’t actually hurt anyone. We see things from her POV, we are quite literally inside her head. Chaol is across the sea, all Chaol hears is that the queen of Terrasen decided to encircle an entire city with her fire magic…and that’s an entire city of her people, fae, people like her. He’s sitting in Adarlan at this point, suffering from PTSD after what’s happened to him, Dorian is enslaved and suffering and Chaol blames himself entirely for that and then he hears this. and he’s sitting in a kingdom that he knows full well what it’s done to Aelin and her kingdom and he justifiably gets a little bit worried that she might turn that power on his people, his kingdom, his king. (who…she spends…a very large portion of QoS………trying to kill. 

I feel like we forget this/don’t discuss it…and actually I’d like it discussed a hell of a lot more in the books as well, Aelin was flat out ready to kill Dorian. She refused to listen to Chaol. She refused to try. She was just like nope, I know best, he’s got to die, I’ve got to kill him. And I understand exactly where she’s coming from with her experiences but the fact of the matter is she was wrong. The point here is that there’s a lot of things going on perspective wise. Chaol is correct given the information that he has; Aelin is correct given the information that she has and this is why they clash because they can’t see past this, they both have solid, logical reasons that they’re right and they don’t understand things from the other person’s POV and neither does the fandom. This generates Problems. 

So I don’t actually think that Chaol clashing with Aelin in QoS has anything to do with prejudices towards magic users. At this point in the story the man is actively working as a leader of a literal rebellion inside the city. He has been working for weeks at this point repeatedly risking his life over and over again to help magic users. And he does this throughout the book. He doesn’t have a magician problem he has an Aelin problem…And it’s a reasonable one as far as I’m concerned. (I’m not saying Aelin is unreasonable but I’m saying that I understand both sides. And there is genuine merit to both sides. And fandom makes this look so much easier than it actually is) 

Chaol is, essentially I think, a good man. And what’s most poignant and interesting for me is that he is an incredibly human character. I mean that in the sense of him being..well literally human when there are all these fae and magic users running around but I also mean in his reactions, in his humanity itself. Chaol has always been, I think, what should have been one of the strongest voices for a reader/every day person to relate to? 

Chaol, for me, presents a really interesting kind of trope subversion actually? Because he’s presented to us as this big, capable guy, very disciplined, an excellent warrior, an elite guard with a position that carries a huge amount of responsibility despite being at a young age. He’s aloof, he’s very loyal, very duty orientated, very serious and sensible.

 But he’s also incredibly moral (I think a lot of these characters are presented to us as emotionless and unfeeling robots who just kill and do as they’re told etc and Chaol undermines that trope and that kind of toxic masculinity incredibly well) And this doesn’t show itself only in him looking down on other characters but he holds himself to those standards as well. Until the end of ToG Chaol had never killed another person before. And the way that he reacts to that is actually…incredibly human? He’s in shock. He seems to display a lot of the symptoms of PTSD in CoM (he stops wearing his sword, he struggles with the idea of him taking a life- even though it was in self-defence, even though he would do it again, even though he knows it was right- it still breaks something in him. He has nightmares about this, he reacts to it in short and it’s an incredibly visceral, empathetic, human reaction which is not something we’re used to seeing from characters like Chaol. 

He shows an incredibly strong incredibly human and incredibly down to earth reaction to violence. Like, I’m pretty sure if I stabbed someone and got covered in their blood and they died as a direct result of this I’d be pretty not okay with that.  And this is what I mean what I say that Chaol is a pretty good reader voice in these books? Because this is…realistically…how I and how I think most people would react to this sort of thing? He isn’t emotionless. He isn’t invincible. He struggles with these things and that’s human and it’s compelling and it’s interesting because we don’t get to see it. 

Usually protagonists just sail through this stuff. They have no qualms, they have no morals, it’s all about ‘whatever you have to do to get the job done’, they kill and torture and hurt people and it has no effect on them whatsoever because they’re Tough and Strong and capable of dealing with all of this. But people, you, me, Chaol, aren’t made that way. Killing bothers us, violence bothers us, we’re emotional beings and this is in our nature and Chaol reflects that nature incredibly well? 

He’s flawed, yes. He has a lot of prejudices that he has to work to unlearn but he’s more than that. He’s not just a lesson for ‘sometimes you think bad things and have you fix yourself’ he’s also a very compelling, very broken character in a lot of ways. 

I can make a pretty reasonable case for Chaol’s position in the castle being the way in which he escaped from an abusive household (the way that his father talks to him and treats him and emotionally manipulates him is not normal. Nor is the way that he talks about his mother. And repeatedly Chaol not being with his father is referred to as him having ‘freedom’ and giving up that freedom for Aelin’s sake. But it’s freedom. People with happy, healthy relationships with their parents don’t tend to think of being on their own and without them as freedom in the stark terms that Chaol does) 

And when you consider his story with that context..it makes a lot more sense. Chaol (a lot like Lucien’s position in ACOTAR at the Spring Court) doesn’t have anywhere else to go and he doesn’t have anything that isn’t this position. He’s dedicated his life to this because it was a place where he mattered, where he seemed to be treated well, where he was doing something that he wanted to do and that’s a huge thing to do if he’s leaving an abusive situation- the strength to step out and actually do something that is fully his choice, to claim his independence and know that if he fails, if this backfires, if he loses this, he’s screwed. He has to go back. And that’s a terrifying prospect for anyone in Chaol’s situation.  

So he clings to this and it’s not just blind loyalty, not after a certain point. I think it was when he was younger but he crosses a line. And it’s not just loyalty to the king or a corrupt regime it’s loyalty to Dorian - the first person who likely treated him fairly and with genuine love and compassion. It’s loyalty to the only thing that he has, quite literally, something that he’s given up everything for, something that he very seriously risked his freedom to attain and losing it is…not an inviting idea. 

So by the time you swing round to QoS Chaol has basically lost…Quite literally everything. His position, his honour, his king, his humanity. He’s thrust into this war, becomes a rebel leader, is trying to do what he can for people while shouldering massive amounts of survivor’s guilt and PTSD over the things that he’s been through. And he just..keeps going. And going and going and going in trying to do the right thing whatever that may be.

 I think that has always been Chaol’s driving force. I think it’s taken the guise of various different things, duty, loyalty, respect etc but it’s always been about that, it’s always been about trying to do what’s right. And before that was being loyal, it was keeping his word, it was doing his job to the very best of his ability. But it slowly becomes other things. It becomes fighting what he once defended, it becomes questioning everything that ever gave him a shred of safety and stability. It becomes taking on a war and a responsibility that is so much larger than he ever thought he would or could deal with and carrying it anyway because it’s the right thing to do. 

And that for me is Chaol and Chaol’s arc in a nutshell and I….Like that a lot. I like that we have someone who is presented to us as being so, damn human. Moral and breakable and flawed and scared and hurt by the things that he’s done and the things that he’s seen. But he embodies one of the things we so often see with deeply human characters - that perseverance, that will to survive, to go on, to just keep fighting, just keep living, just keep going because that’s what people do, that’s what Chaol does and it’s just…idk dude I like this character a lot idk what else to tell you.