what if will was a grimm

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matching simon and baz transparent circle thingies because i just finished carry on for the third time and i’m having a lot of feelings

feel free to use them as icons or whatever as long as you credit!

autumn is here 🍁🍂💛

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and then i saw them. those burning red eyes…

Wolfstar Raising Harry AU Headcanons

* Toddler Harry with his little leather jacket just like Sirius’s
* Sirius, in dog form, carrying toddler Harry all around the house on his back
* Because Sirius and Remus don’t want to act like they’re replacing Harry’s parents, he grows up using “my Moony” and “my Pads” the way most people say “my mum and dad”.
* When Harry was little, he was scared of thunderstorms. He’d run and hide under Remus’s oversized sweater, wrapping his arms around Remus and shaking.
* Sirius always made pancakes in crazy shapes- a snitch, a broomstick, a dragon, a castle- and sometimes in different colors with food dye.
* Little Harry not understanding why his Moony had to lock himself in the basement for the night once a month
* At night, Remus would read Harry bedtime stories, both the Tales of Beedle the Bard and the Grimm Brothers stories, because that’s what Lily would have wanted.
* Harry jumping up and down with excitement when Sirius and Remus decide he’s old enough for a real broomstick
* When they went out shopping, Harry would hold both his guardians’ hands and jump in the air and swing between them for a second every couple steps
* When Remus and Sirius were busy, Andromeda would babysit. Harry loved playing with his older “cousin”, Tonks.
* After a very eventful trip to the park during which they discovered Harry was a parselmouth, they bought him a pet snake, which he named Sherman. At first, Remus wasn’t very happy about it (he didn’t much like snakes), but then he noticed that Harry’s room stayed cleaner than it normally did. When asked, Harry revealed that Sherman had started refusing to play with him until he did his tidying. After that, Remus was rather fond of the creature.
* Ignoring protests from Sirius, Remus bought Harry a few academic books (Elementary Transfiguration, Defense for Dummies, A Simplified History of Magic, etc.) a full year before he got his Hogwarts letter.
* Harry always writing his name as Harry L. B. Potter (for Lupin-Black), because he wanted to acknowledge them as his parents without giving up his connection to Lily and James
* Sirius tearing up when he and Remus put Harry on the Hogwarts Express for the first time
* The Weasley twins showing Harry the map, thinking he’ll be astounded, but he just goes, “Oh, my dads made that!”
* Harry was warned about Snape by both Remus and Sirius (albeit in very different ways) ahead of time, so he studied his Potions book diligently over the summer and answered all Snape’s questions correctly with an infuriating smirk on his face.
* The Mirror of Erised still shows Harry’s parents, but Remus and Sirius are there too, because he can’t imagine life without them.
* The first time Harry jinxes Malfoy at school (for making extremely offensive comments about half-humans), he gets a Howler the next morning that yells only “NICE ONE, SON” in Sirius’s voice.
* Sirius thinks it’s hilarious that people think Harry is the heir of Slytherin in 2nd year. “Sherman wants to know why he doesn’t have his own secret chamber too!”
* When Remus teaches in 3rd year, Harry is thrilled. He proudly announces, “That’s my Moony,” when Remus takes his seat at the staff table. In the evenings, he hangs out in the DADA classroom to do his homework, often accompanied by Ron and Hermione.
* Harry showing up to class late and Remus, trying to look stern but still smiling a little, says, “I’m sorry, Harry, but I’m going to have to give you a detention,” to which Harry grins and responds, “Yes, /sir/,” because he spends most evenings with his Moony anyway, and Remus never docks points or schedules the detentions to interfere with Quidditch. Occasionally, someone tries to complain to McGonagall about Harry being shown favoritism, but she just shrugs and says, “He’s serving detention, isn’t he?”
* Harry casts his Patronus by thinking about the first time Remus took the Wolfsbane Potion and could stay home on the full moon.
* After the mud-throwing incident in Hogsmeade, Harry runs up to the DADA classroom to tell Remus all about it, and they both laugh, and Remus says, “That’s my boy, haunting the Shrieking Shack just like his Moony.”
* Harry constantly sending Remus messages like, “How can I accomplish this thing without technically breaking any school rules” and Remus almost always has an answer.
* Sirius dying of laughter as a very aggravated Harry recounts, via the two-way mirrors, his attempts to secure a date for the Yule Ball
* Sirius and Remus arriving in a panic less than five minutes after Barty Crouch Jr was unmasked, with Sirius actually looking close to tears. They resolutely refuse to leave, no matter what Madam Pomfrey says, though they consent to be silent. Harry falls asleep holding both their hands.
* Harry trying to sneak into Order meetings under the Invisibility Cloak, so Remus and Sirius get in the habit of Summoning his glasses before they start to check if he’s in the room. Harry, with his father’s cleverness, retaliates by teaching himself how to make things Unsummonable.
* When Harry tells them that he has to go on a mission for Dumbledore, Sirius snorts and says, “You don’t really think we’re letting you go off on your own, do you? We’re coming.”
* The last time Harry sees Remus and Sirius before going to sacrifice himself, they’re fighting back-to-back against a pair of Death Eaters. Harry whispers, “I love you. Don’t die,” before turning away.

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Nadalind | Nick Burkhardt x Adalind Schade

Grimm - Pilot:

Nick: Oh, well, I am getting married once, not four times.
Hank: Oh, you’re a happily ever after guy.
Nick: Yeah. [He notices Adalind]
Hank: Detective, what are you looking at? You just bought a ring.
Nick: That’s not what I’m looking at.
Hank: Come on, don’t ruin it for me.
Nick: No, she wears Armani, makes low six figures, drives a BMW, and is falling for a senior partner at her law firm. Nothing but trouble, Hank.

Some people with fandoms: fixates on one then moved onto another, while maybe keeping one prized fandom
Me with fandoms: piles one obsession on top of another until what little social life I once had is completely destroyed

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Ok I realised I wasn’t happy with the last one, so I came back to it. I like these ones a lot more but now I don’t know wich one to choose aha:) The black and white seems stronger but I’m really happy with the colors on the first one. What do you guys think about it?

Hey here’s an illustration I had done for an exhibition about the Brothers Grimm’s fairy tales. Yeah it’s a bit creepy:) I wanted to go for a painterly look with this one, I’ve been inspired by Goya’s wonderful paintings (the image is really big so tumblr messed up the quality).

It comes from a tale called “The Story of the Youth Who Went Forth to Learn what Fear Was”. Here’s the part that inspired me: “And as the wind knocked the hanged men against each other, and they moved backwards and forwards, he thought to himself: ‘If you shiver below by the fire, how those up above must freeze and suffer!’ And as he felt pity for them, he raised the ladder, and climbed up, unbound one of them after the other, and brought down all seven. Then he stoked the fire, blew it, and set them all round it to warm themselves.”

Why We Need Stories about Dark Things

One of the things I get tired of from time to time is the perspective that if something shows evil behavior then that means the story, song, game, whatever, is inherently bad. But there is a difference between illustrating evil behavior and promoting it.

Not all appearances of bad behavior invite bad behavior.

While one purpose of storytelling is to entertain, another purpose is to teach or educate–a purpose that in today’s world, most people seem to have forgotten.

A long time ago, there used to be all sorts of horrific stories told. Open Grimms’ fairy tales, and you’ll see that Cinderella really isn’t that Disney-friendly. But often some of those older stories were meant to teach a lesson or scare children into behaving (that latter point is one I personally don’t condone). Horrific things happen in the Bible (and the Book of Mormon). We can often learn from these accounts, but some of them are simply a record of what happened (if you believe in that), whether you like the content or not. It is what it is. Conspiring incest, rape, slaughter, and even cannibalism can be found in scripture stories. In today’s world, most people have been conditioned to believe that stories are only meant to entertain. Or entertain and uplift.

Those two things are valid. But what I get tired of, though, is the perspective that all stories should be full of puppies and rainbows (yeah, that’s an exaggeration, but you know what I mean), and that’s what we should be writing, and if a story is dark, it’s “bad” or lesser or … something.

The World Needs Stories about Dark Things

It’s important we write about what I call “the big and heavies”–rape, addiction, suicide, massacre, societal brainwashing, etc. And when I say “we,” I don’t mean specifically that you or I HAVE to; I mean “we” as in us, writers and creatives everywhere. The world needs creatives who delve into the big and heavies, and here’s why:

1. Stories provide a safe means to explore and discuss dark things

The big and heavies are vital to discuss for a healthy society. We shouldn’t be turning a blind eye to dark deeds. We should be turning the right eye to them. Literature offers a safe way to explore and discuss these issues. It offers some distance (because it’s usually a work of fiction) while simultaneously having the ability to offer closeness–empathy.

Also, fiction provides a type of lens to view these behaviors through. Speculative fiction might have a more exaggerated or symbolic lens, such as the fashion industry of Panem in The Hunger Games, or the discussion of pure bloods in Harry Potter. A lens lets us view the issues in a way that may emphasize certain points or give us a new perspective on them, and again, the distance can provide a bit of a “safe” buffer for readers. We aren’t talking about racism; we’re talking about magical blood–and we can have a whole discussion on it that correlates with issues seen in racism, and no one needs to feel uncomfortable because this is about wizarding blood. Even realistic fiction provides a perspective, though less exaggerated, to see these issues through.

2. Powerful, emotional ramification drives home a point or idea or lesson.

Unlike reading text books or the news, fiction writing often works off making the audience feel something. It appeals to emotional experience, even more than intellectual experience. It is one of the only mediums where we can put on the skin and thoughts of another person.

In parts of society, we try hard to divorce intellect and emotion, but powerful emotional experiences are often what cement ideas and lessons into our minds. Back in the day, fathers used to take their children out to their property line and beat them so that the child would never forget where the property line was. We’ve seen similar conditioning with training wild animals. Both are crude examples, of course, but the emotional experience drove home the lesson. While negative emotions are powerful, this same thing can happen with strong positive emotions. We remember powerful feelings of happiness and of love, and if there are any lessons or insights associated with those, we recall those too.

In fiction, emotional experiences can drive home powerful lessons. And they stick with the audience.

Strong emotional experiences in fiction amplify the conceptual ramifications of dark deeds, and cements into the reader the weight of such behavior, in a way that pure intellect cannot. Once we “experience” an issue, we care more about it. Fiction is a vehicle that allows us to develop and fine-tune our empathetic skills, so we can better understand and relate to those who’ve dealt with such issues.

3. Explore, cognitively, the causes, consequences, and facets of the big and heavies

In the real world, we live our own lives in our own perspectives, and that’s it. In literature, you can include several perspectives of those involved with an issue. You can often see the issue’s causes, consequences, and facets to a degree you may not in your own life. You can see far-reaching effects in a matter of hundreds of pages, rather than decades or hundreds of years. This opens up new ideas, new perspectives on the topic, which leads to more discussion.

4. To provide hope and uplift, in spite of darkness. To overcome.

I sometimes see this weird idea that an uplifting story needs to not cross some invisible line too far into the dark. In some ways, that couldn’t be further from the truth. As a Harry Potter fan, I’ve had friends come up to me and talk about how they’re disappointed that the stories got darker and darker. Maybe I’m weird (okay, there’s no “maybe” about it), but I like that. I like stories getting dark. I like when they get darker and darker. I like my evil, evil. I want the Voldemort who tries to possess Harry to get Dumbledore to kill him. I want the Voldemort who tortured animals as a small child and who murdered others to split his soul into seven pieces. The world is often an evil place. And how much more powerful is it to overcome the bowels of the most wicked, than it is to overcome a guy who shoplifted? I like my evil, evil. Not because I want to be part of the dark, but because I like seeing people overcome it.

A story that includes dark materials can be just as uplifting, if not more uplifting (because of the contrast) than a story that doesn’t. The idea that a story can’t be dark and inspiring is just unfounded.

Every Christmas season, I become a fan of The Trans-Siberian Orchestra all over again. If you’ve never heard of them, you may still recognize some of their most iconic Christmas songs, some of which have gone viral on synchronized Christmas light videos.

What many people might not realize is that each of their Christmas albums actual tells, and comes with, a written story. If you see the Trans-Siberian Orchestra live, they will read the story to you bits at a time, interspersed with music. But not all their stories are about happy sleigh rides, warm fires, Christmas hams, and decorated trees. There are parents who abandoned their disabled children, babies born addicted to crack, love that has been lost. But the stories and albums are uplifting, not because the creators avoided dark subject matter, but because they illustrated the power of overcoming–overcoming difficult times and personal mistakes. It’s hard to make it through one of their performances with a dry eye through the whole thing.

5. To render reality–others’ reality or your own

But some stories aren’t necessarily meant to be about overcoming the dark or inspiring an audience. Some stories are just about reality. Human nature. The natural man. Experiences that people actually go through. Some stories are simply meant to render, often for reasons 1-3. It’s a statement. It’s meant to create social awareness, empathy. Maybe it’s meant to start a discussion. Those stories need to exist too.

Closing Thoughts

Keep in mind that many audiences only see stories strictly as mediums for entertainment and, on a subconscious level, a reinforcement of a positive, maybe even sugary, feelings and ideas. Those audiences may (on a subconscious level) refuse anything that is otherwise, and consider any mention of the dark and heavies as something that shouldn’t be there. That is their right.

And in some cases, they are correct. Some stories do not need and should not have dark content. It doesn’t serve the purpose of the story, it messes up the tone of the story, and it can ruin what was already working. You wouldn’t, for example, put in a serious plot line in The Office about Pam being legitimately raped. It doesn’t fit.

And with all that said, you shouldn’t feel forced to write content you feel very uncomfortable writing. Your work should reflect the writerly you.

Next week, I’ll talk about how to write about dark things without promoting them.

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Carry On Epilogue

“I was eleven years old, and I’d lost my mother, and my soul, and the Crucible gave me you.”
“It made us roommates,” he says.
I shake my head. “We were always more.”
“We were enemies.”
“You were the centre of my universe,” I say. “Everything else spun around you.”
“Because of what I was, Baz. Because of my magic.”
“No.” I’m nearly as frustrated as he is. “Yes. I mean, Crowley, Snow—yes, that was part of it. Looking at you was like looking directly into the sun.”
“I’ll never be that again.”
“No. And thank magic.” I sigh forcefully. “The way you were before … Simon Snow, there wasn’t a day when I believed we’d both live through it.”
“Through what?”
“Life. You were the sun, and I was crashing into you. I’d wake up every morning and think, ‘This will end in flames.’”

-Carry on by Rainbow Rowell 

(see all my snowbaz gifs)

snowbaz

you know what angers me? the fact that whoever created the ship name for simon snow and baz pitch from carry on thought that ‘snowbaz’ was a good one. like, you literally couldve made it 'snazlton’. snazzleton. that sounds so much coOLER. it couldve been shortened to snazz or snazzy or snazzle. that is so much beTter. i am disappointed in the creators. you had a chance, and you never took it.

still luv my bbs tho