what if people are saying something bad or

anonymous asked:

Some people simply don't accept homosexuality. I personally think Ruby and Saphire are couple, Pearl loved Rose romantically, Diamonds are sisters and Topaz is a romantic relationship. Coming from an Hetero. I just think they should accept this kind of stuff, it's natural. I'm not trying to change anyone's opinion, but I think they should know this is something real and it's not bad, just different taste. They should accept instead of running from it, and that's what this show is trying to do.

I agree that we should accept different opinions. I underdtand that a lot of people see the diamonds as sisters and i have no problem with that- as long as they understand that in canon nothing says that they are- there is actually evidence that proves that gems lack that concept. So making them ‘sisters’ is just as fictional as making them lovers.

I just dont understand why people that headcanon them as sisters feel the need to point it out on posts that interpret their relationship differently.

luke0maker  asked:

"Sorry senpai!!"..... wait, this isn't for me? Oh sorry, is for byu lol...... Now let's stop joking, for who is blaming Byu..... Byu is a friend of Jakei, she can make this joke as long as Jakei is okay with it, and she is really ok, but random people making this joke and saying bad things is other situation okay guys? Stop blaming her, wtf.

The idea here isn’t to blame this other person neither, but rather letting them know that what they have done isn’t funny or right at all.

I wouldn’t even DARE to say something bad to Jakei because she is literally an inspiration for me! If she says that something offends her, then I’ll do my best to avoid saying something that makes her upset. I totally respect her.

And this wasn’t some random people making ‘’this joke’’, they were literally xenophobic and really rude comments about herself, as she explained on that post of hers.

Congratulations, you’ve made your way back to the original version of this post. Since I value my mental health too much to argue with all of you individually over an UNTAGGED VENT POST made on the PERSONAL BLOG of an LGBT WOC, I will provide you with some responses here:

1. Whitewashing is not acceptable. Reimagining a character as a different race is fine. If you’re okay with black Meg but not with white Tiana, then you’ve missed the point.

2. Genderbends don’t have to be F –> M or M –> F. You can reinterpret a character as agender if you want.

3. Stop acting like MOST women don’t have curvier shapes, longer hair, and feminized facial features, and MOST men have rectangular builds, shorter hair, and masculinized facial features. Those are what people go after when doing genderbends. They’re not saying that all women and all men look like that, they’re just doing what is easy.

4. A character being problematic can be an intention of a content creator. That doesn’t make the creator a bad person.

5. Stop sending me hatemail/death threats/other bullshit messages. I don’t think you want to cyberbully an LGBT Middle Eastern chick with depression, do you?


Tumblr REALLY needs to learn when something is a design choice done intentionally or for fun and when something is a racist/sexist/LGBTphobic caricature.

THIS is a racist caricature.

The various races represented here are grossly exaggerated and narrowed down to the utmost basic of their character traits, with the white guy being the most formal and the other races looking more savage.

THIS is NOT a racist caricature.

These are taking known characters and redesigning them to perhaps show what they would look like as a different ethnicity. Their designs do not boil down to exaggerated stereotypes.

THIS is a sexist caricature.

Women are inherently being represented as unable to do the most mundane of tasks, such as opening a bottle. On top of that, the woman is pretty, with lipstick and primped hair and nice nails, as only pretty girls can be in advertisements.

THIS is NOT a sexist caricature.

Each character is unique and has their own talents and skills, and even if the two girls are conventionally ‘pretty’, they are represented as incredibly smart and capable.

THIS is a transphobic caricature.

It represented the ‘trans woman’ as just a man in women’s clothes - notably as an ugly man with overly masculine features - and attempts to represent trans women as a threat to children despite literally no evidence to that claim.

THIS is NOT a transphobic caricature.

These characters who were originally male are being reinterpreted as women (not men in drag). This is an experiment in design, not a message that men and women are the only genders.

The major point in all of these is intent. In the first images, the intent is clearly to offend and misrepresent. In the second images, the intent is clearly to explore new designs and character reinterpretations.

So the next time you want to complain that people who draw Lucio as a Junker are racist or people who genderbend the Ed Edd n Eddy cast are transphobic, maybe consider the intent of the artist and realize that NOT EVERYTHING IS MADE TO OFFEND YOU.

2

infodumping about the ocean

anonymous asked:

i love your headcanons. I'm sick rn could you please do your magic?

in honor of both of us being sick here are some….. sick headcanons

  • [sees galra ship] [slams lion into other lion] “punch buggy no punch backs”
  • concept: allura getting used to her powers
    • for the first few weeks she leaves sparkles everywhere like a cat that sheds glitter
    • sometimes when she gets mad she accidentally shorts out the power in the castle
    • permanent static cling. her hair’s just. up there. somewhere
  • keith doesn’t have a driver’s permit
  • do you think shiro’s arm could be rigged up to play music. because pidge thinks about that a lot. hunk. hunk would it be weird if i asked him to let me plug my phone into his–
  • if coran says the mice “have something of mine,” it’s his underwear
    • they like to leave them in random places to fuck with him
    • now the paladins think that coran just has a habit of stripping around the castle which is… yeah
  • some voltron trio names (courtesy of lance)
    • keith, hunk, pidge: Traffic Light Trio
    • hunk, pidge, coran: Nerd³
    • lance, keith, hunk: Primary Paladins
    • shiro, hunk, keith: FGFP (Fingerless Gloves and Fanny Packs)
    • pidge, keith, allura: a bad idea what the hell shiro–
  • lance: “hunk i’m gonna say something and i need you to not judge me for it” hunk: “uh…” lance: “out loud” hunk: “oh that i can do, go for it”

episode two :: Yuri realizes, suddenly and terribly, he might be a little bit in love.  


Victor doesn’t even try to go to sleep.  He just lays in bed with his laptop, watching the thirty-seven takes of Yuuri trying to get “hi, I’m Yuuri Katsuki, and I’m the Bachelor” out of his mouth.

Don’t they know who I am?” Yuuri slurs on screen.  

Yuuri, you have to put the champagne bottle down, you have to pretend to be sober,” Phichit says off camera, all authority gone from his voice.  He’s trying not to laugh.

Phichit,” Yuuri says, and he takes a big swig from the bottle, bubbles pouring down both sides of his lips. “You can’t tell me what to do.  I’m Yuuri Katsuki, and I’m the motherfucking Bachelor.

Keep reading

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

Angst questions

Yeah so um I decided to make an oc ask meme based around angst. Some of these I came up with myself, others are from other ask memes and I just picked the angsty ones so here goes:

1. What’s one experience your character had that made them very afraid?

2. Does your character have a deep and/or dark secret? If so, what is it?

3. Have they ever lost a loved one? What happened to them, and are they the same as they were before they lost them?

4. Has your character ever been hurt or betrayed by someone they thought they could depend on? What happened?

5. Would they ever turn on someone they just met in order to save themselves?

6. Have they ever committed a crime, or something they felt was wrong? What was it?

7. If your character was allowed to murder one person without any consequences, who would it be and why?

8. Does your character have any enemies? If so, who and why?

9. Is the character a victim of abuse?

10. What were the character’s parents like? What was the affect the parents had on the character?

11. What are your character’s coping mechanisms?

12. Do they like to suffer? Like to see other people suffering?

13. What does it take to make your character cry?

14. What is your character’s biggest relationship flaw? Has this flaw destroyed relationships for them before?

15. What is their biggest fear? What in general scares them? How do they act when they’re scared?

16. What are your character’s vices and bad habits?

17. Is your character afraid of death? Why/why not?

18. Would society call your character a good guy or a bad guy? what would they say they are?

19. What is your character insecure about?

20.  What was something they struggled with greatly and how did they overcome it?

21. Does your character have anyone that they really care about, to the point that they would give their life for them? If so, who are they and what is your character’s relation to them? If not, do they wish they did? Is there anyone they wish they could build such a relationship with?

22. If they could change just one thing about themselves, what would it be?

23. Is your character more physically or emotionally strong? Why is this?

24. What is your character’s most important possession? Why?

25. Do they find that they care what others think of them? Or do they not really mind how others view them?

26. What, in your character’s life, puts the most pressure on them?

27.  What would be the worst way to die, in your character’s opinion?

28. What is your character’s greatest strength?

29. What is their weapon of choice, and what weapon do they dislike using the most?

30. What makes them feel safe or secure? What makes them feel insecure or unsafe?

Things Not to Do in a Tarot Reading

Originally posted by korilakkuma-say


Most readings go over great! However, there is definitely some level of etiquette expected. Here’s a list of some things that can instantly turn a reading sour!

For the Querent…

💎 Be Disrespectful. This should really go without saying. If you’re getting a reading, treat them with respect! They are providing a service just like anybody else you would give money to. Even if they’re doing it for free, they’re still taking time out of their day to help you out.

💎 Cram Questions. Typically, it goes one question, one card, with more cards providing more insight or addressing different facets of a single question. It makes a reader’s head ache when someone purchases a single card draw, but sends the reader a billion questions. They’re trying to get the insight of a ten-card spread for basically a dollar, and from the reader’s end it feels like they’re being slighted. It’s simple: if you want more insight and more detail, choose a reading that fits your needs.

💎 Fight the Reading. There are two ways people do this: fighting the message, and fighting the reader.  In the first, if the cards say something the querent doesn’t like, and they get upset, trying to get the reader to “fix” their answer. This mostly comes from people who wanted a tarot reading for self-affirmation, rather than insight into a problem. If you want a feel-good tarot sesh that’s fine; be sure to either purchase a reading designed for that, or let your reader know you’re not up for bad news right then. The second comes from fellow readers! The reader will be going about their business and the querent will say, “I read tarot and that’s not what that card means.” It may seem like a kind gesture at first, but not all decks have the same meaning for every card and the reader’s intuition and unique interpretation are just as important as the card. If the meanings were set in stone for every card, we wouldn’t need to go to other readers!

💎 Treat the Reader Like a Hack. Skepticism is understandable. Skepticism is completely fine! A lot of skeptics end up getting tarot readings either for the novelty of it, or because their friend dragged them into it. It’s okay to approach a reading with a healthy amount of reservation, waiting to see what’s in store before totally investing in it. However, there’s a line between being skeptical, and being a jerk about it. Don’t spend the whole time trying to “expose” your reader as a fraud, constantly critique on how vague or not they’re being, and just steamrolling over the message they’re trying to give you so that you can feel superior somehow. It doesn’t make you look like a hero, it makes you look like someone I impersonate with an annoying voice to my friends over dinner.

💎 Ask Questions that are Clearly Out of Line. Tarot can get pretty heavy sometimes. A lot of experienced readers have at least one story of someone who really opened up to them about dark subjects, and they worked through it together. A lot of different subjects are acceptable, but some just… really aren’t. My friend had a querent approach him online, all but straight-up saying they were meant to be together and asking for a reading about their future. I’ve had people approach me asking for me to diagnose their illness. If you have a question about a potentially triggering subject, please please ask your reader if they are comfortable reading for that topic before just unloading a graphic description on them. Also, don’t hit on your reader. It’s the occult equivalent of hitting on your waitress.

For the Reader…

💎 Minimize the Querent’s Concerns. This person came to you with a question in mind, and is putting their trust in you. What seems trivial to you may be a big deal to someone else! If someone approaches you asking what they can do to bond with their cat more, don’t make them feel silly for choosing that question; that’s their prerogative. If they’re concerned enough about it to get a tarot reading, maybe there’s more to it than meets the eye!

💎 Judge Their Question (to their face.) I won’t say “don’t judge them at all,” because often that’s impossible. We’re only human, after all. Let’s say your querent is considering leaving their long-term relationship for a sketchy but passionate fling. You might think this person has garbage priorities, but I promise any lecture you feel like giving them, they’ve already heard. They’re not paying you to nag or bestow your personal ethics onto them. They’ve already done whatever they’ve done, and now they would just like some insight before moving forward. It’s not a reader’s job or a reader’s place to place moral judgement on a reader. (It’s a lot like being a therapist… everything is neutral and confidential, unless there’s evidence of abuse or potential harm to the querent or someone else. If the querent did/is doing something illegal, that’s a different matter.)

💎 Be Disrespectful. Again, this should go without saying. Our querents deserve a little dignity! It’s okay to laugh with them, should the atmosphere allow for it, but never laugh at them. A querent’s feelings are perfectly valid and should be treated as such. They are not inherently foolish or less wise than you, so let’s all agree to not present ourselves as these sages of wisdom helping the poor little mortals.

💎 Half-Ass It. Someone is actually giving you literal money! We get that you’re tired. We get that you hate the question, but literal shapeshifting master of darkness Aku could kick down the door to your Tarot Shack, slap down a five dollar bill, and ask for a reading on his love life. You would still be ethically obligated to actually try and give a reading based on what the cards say, and in a reasonable amount of depth that someone who doesn’t read tarot would feel like they got a sufficient amount of insight. Basically, you’re offering a service. Give it your all!

Originally posted by verona7881

Understanding the species Gentleman


You hear it everywhere these days: the term “gent” or “gentleman” has become ubiquitous in men’s magazines, blogs, and conversations. Videos welcome “gentlemen” and everybody seems to use the word for a wide range of men.
Some say that anything other than the traditional definition of a gentleman is a disappointment. Other claim that a gentleman must have staff and would never cook for himself.
Well I couldn’t disagree more – the definition of a gentleman has changed and for the better. Since the definition of a gentleman is so fundamental to what Gentleman’s Essentials stands for, I thought it was time to explain the way we understand what a gentleman is. For this excursion, I’d like to take you back…

The Origin
Hundreds of years ago, a gentleman was a man of high social position and wealth. Even dictionaries today point to this definition, as well as several others:
1. A chivalrous, courteous, or honorable man.
2. A polite or formal way of referring to a man.
3. A man of noble birth attached to a royal household
4. A man of good social position, especially one of wealth and leisure
5. A courteous title for a male fellow member of the House of Commons or the House of Representatives

So what does it really mean? There is much more to being a gentleman than mere courtesy; traditional acts of chivalry can come off as condescending, and “honor” is a highly relative concept.
These days, the title “gentleman” is no longer relevant as an indication of one’s refinement and character, as it was once assumed to be for men of wealth and title who didn’t have to work for a living.
In our opinion, the term is far more egalitarian, and these days, to say you are a gentleman means you have to earn it. Wealth and power are no longer enough, and in fact, they simply aren’t a relevant part of the modern definition. 

Money and position can’t buy you class or respect.

The Definition of a Modern Gentleman
The term is far more complicated, and we think it’s important to shed some light on why and how we use it, and why the definition of the modern gentleman matters.
We firmly believe any man can be a gentleman if he wants to be, but it’s not a small undertaking. It’s a journey, something that a man continually strives to be, rather than a destination. A gentleman is/ has:

1 A Gentleman Has Good Manners: Here, we agree with the dictionary. A gentleman is courteous, polite, and respectful. He says please and thank you, waits his turn in line, and treats others as they wish to be treated. He is an equitable conversation partner.

2 A Gentleman Has High Standards. High standards push people to do the best they can, and gentlemen set them for themselves. A gentleman expects a high standard of quality, value, and functionality from the things he buys to the things he does. He expects as much of himself as he does of other people.

3 A Gentleman is Well Dressed: This one shouldn’t be a surprise. A well-dressed man is appropriately attired based on the season, the occasion, and his own style. Dressing well isn’t a matter of money for a gentleman, but rather of careful curation of clothing and accessories based on his means, the occasion, and his tastes. His dress demonstrates that he recognizes the power of clothes the impression they make, and the role they play in society. Clothes are used to convey a gentleman’s respect for his host, his office, or for the host of an event, but not to shock, evoke jealousy, or show off. Dressing well is a point of pride for a gentleman because it demonstrates his personality and taste.

4 A Gentleman is Imperfect. This may be the most important characteristic on the list. The term “gentleman” isn’t meant to be an unattainable ideal; it takes into account basic human nature, in which we all make mistakes, choices, and judgments every day. The difference lies in that a gentleman does not believe himself to be perfect, but instead takes ownership and responsibility for the things he can control: his actions, knowledge, and approach to the world.

5 A Gentleman is Open Minded: A gentleman does not believe that his opinions and knowledge are complete and unquestionable. He strives to learn, is open to new ideas, accepts constructive criticism, and welcomes failure as a path to growth and self-awareness. A gentleman does not argue purely for the pleasure of being right but focuses on is able to put himself in other people’s shoes for the purposes of understanding an alternate perspective from his own.
he person who cut you off on the highway may have received bad news; a friend may not respond to your call because they are behind at work – a gentleman tries not to jump to negative conclusions about other people.

6 A Gentleman is Interesting and Informed: These days it is easy to get lost in the cycle of sleep-work-netflix-repeat that deprives people of anything interesting to say. An interesting man can successfully carry a conversation about a number of subjects, is interested in the world around him and how it works, and actively seeks to grow his knowledge for his own character building and enjoyment. Hobbies and personal interests reveal his passions and his engagement with activities that are meaningful to him.

7 A Gentleman’s Actions Match His Words. Quite simply, a gentleman makes promises that he intends to keep.

8 A Gentleman Treats People with Respect: When we say people, we mean everyone – women, colleagues, superiors, waitstaff and customer service people. This reflects a gentleman’s belief that all people are created equal; he does not claim to have more or fewer rights than those around him. He is compassionate with those less fortunate than himself. He doesn’t believe that the world is a zero-sum game, nor does he believe that putting someone else down will lift him up.

9 A Gentleman Recognizes the Difference Between Arrogance and Confidence. If an arrogant man who believes himself to be of superior importance relies on his opinion of himself relative to others. A gentleman believes in himself and his abilities independently of other people. An arrogant man must always win to feel validated while a gentleman self-validates from within. 

10 A Gentleman Wields Power Purposefully. Though there are many potential sources for the statement “with great power comes great responsibility,” there is an inherent truth in it for a gentleman. If he is in a position of power, he combines all of the above traits to utilize that power purposefully and not selfishly. Not for revenge, not for his own personal gain, and not in a way that tramples the rights of others.

So why does this all matter? It matters because being a gentleman sets a high bar for men, us included, to actively work towards every day. Rather than being a destination, it’s an aspiration that comes from the lifetime pursuit of personal betterment, self-awareness, and motivation.
The highest achievement is to be recognized as a gentleman by those around you, since at it’s core it is an honor conferred only by other people. We use the term gentleman frequently, and we think it should mean something. It’s not just a way to address other men; it’s a statement about who we are and who we want to be.

The Challenges of Being a Gentleman in Everyday Life
While all of this sounds admirable, living up to those ideals day in and day out can become quite challenging at times. When a man is in a bad mood, stressed or tired, he may say or do things that are out of character. In those situations it is important to apologize to others and if it is sincere people will accept it. I know what I am talking about because I certainly have my fair share of ungentlemanly failures.

Okay so there’s a lot of talk about how BPD tumblr encourages abusive behaviour and stuff so I thought I’d say share my thoughts.

  • Most of the posts used as examples are about splitting.
  • Splitting is NOT inherently abusive.
  • Splitting is something that many borderlines struggle with, and it’s not their fault.
  • Splitting on someone does not automatically mean you are being abusive. How you FEEL is not abusive. How you ACT is.
  • You are NOT a bad person for splitting.

However,

  • You should think critically about how you act and what you post - there ARE some people who joke about behaviours that are abusive.
  • Abusive behaviours I’ve seen joked about include: intentionally hurting someone when you split on them, punishing people when they upset you.
  • Other unhealthy things include being unwilling to work on your disorder and being unwilling to acknowledge that some of your past or current behaviours are toxic.

But also,

  • You shouldn’t feel bad for making jokes about your negative symptoms as long as they are not encouraging anything unhealthy.
  • For many people, including myself, BPD tumblr is the only community where it is safe to talk openly about the symptoms of this disorder, and have other people understand you.

It really upsets me to see people painting all of us with the same brush, especially considering that BPD can display itself in a number of different ways. Not to mention that most of us are actively seeking help (therapy, meds, etc.)

Why We Need Stories about Dark Things

One of the things I get tired of from time to time is the perspective that if something shows evil behavior then that means the story, song, game, whatever, is inherently bad. But there is a difference between illustrating evil behavior and promoting it.

Not all appearances of bad behavior invite bad behavior.

While one purpose of storytelling is to entertain, another purpose is to teach or educate–a purpose that in today’s world, most people seem to have forgotten.

A long time ago, there used to be all sorts of horrific stories told. Open Grimms’ fairy tales, and you’ll see that Cinderella really isn’t that Disney-friendly. But often some of those older stories were meant to teach a lesson or scare children into behaving (that latter point is one I personally don’t condone). Horrific things happen in the Bible (and the Book of Mormon). We can often learn from these accounts, but some of them are simply a record of what happened (if you believe in that), whether you like the content or not. It is what it is. Conspiring incest, rape, slaughter, and even cannibalism can be found in scripture stories. In today’s world, most people have been conditioned to believe that stories are only meant to entertain. Or entertain and uplift.

Those two things are valid. But what I get tired of, though, is the perspective that all stories should be full of puppies and rainbows (yeah, that’s an exaggeration, but you know what I mean), and that’s what we should be writing, and if a story is dark, it’s “bad” or lesser or … something.

The World Needs Stories about Dark Things

It’s important we write about what I call “the big and heavies”–rape, addiction, suicide, massacre, societal brainwashing, etc. And when I say “we,” I don’t mean specifically that you or I HAVE to; I mean “we” as in us, writers and creatives everywhere. The world needs creatives who delve into the big and heavies, and here’s why:

1. Stories provide a safe means to explore and discuss dark things

The big and heavies are vital to discuss for a healthy society. We shouldn’t be turning a blind eye to dark deeds. We should be turning the right eye to them. Literature offers a safe way to explore and discuss these issues. It offers some distance (because it’s usually a work of fiction) while simultaneously having the ability to offer closeness–empathy.

Also, fiction provides a type of lens to view these behaviors through. Speculative fiction might have a more exaggerated or symbolic lens, such as the fashion industry of Panem in The Hunger Games, or the discussion of pure bloods in Harry Potter. A lens lets us view the issues in a way that may emphasize certain points or give us a new perspective on them, and again, the distance can provide a bit of a “safe” buffer for readers. We aren’t talking about racism; we’re talking about magical blood–and we can have a whole discussion on it that correlates with issues seen in racism, and no one needs to feel uncomfortable because this is about wizarding blood. Even realistic fiction provides a perspective, though less exaggerated, to see these issues through.

2. Powerful, emotional ramification drives home a point or idea or lesson.

Unlike reading text books or the news, fiction writing often works off making the audience feel something. It appeals to emotional experience, even more than intellectual experience. It is one of the only mediums where we can put on the skin and thoughts of another person.

In parts of society, we try hard to divorce intellect and emotion, but powerful emotional experiences are often what cement ideas and lessons into our minds. Back in the day, fathers used to take their children out to their property line and beat them so that the child would never forget where the property line was. We’ve seen similar conditioning with training wild animals. Both are crude examples, of course, but the emotional experience drove home the lesson. While negative emotions are powerful, this same thing can happen with strong positive emotions. We remember powerful feelings of happiness and of love, and if there are any lessons or insights associated with those, we recall those too.

In fiction, emotional experiences can drive home powerful lessons. And they stick with the audience.

Strong emotional experiences in fiction amplify the conceptual ramifications of dark deeds, and cements into the reader the weight of such behavior, in a way that pure intellect cannot. Once we “experience” an issue, we care more about it. Fiction is a vehicle that allows us to develop and fine-tune our empathetic skills, so we can better understand and relate to those who’ve dealt with such issues.

3. Explore, cognitively, the causes, consequences, and facets of the big and heavies

In the real world, we live our own lives in our own perspectives, and that’s it. In literature, you can include several perspectives of those involved with an issue. You can often see the issue’s causes, consequences, and facets to a degree you may not in your own life. You can see far-reaching effects in a matter of hundreds of pages, rather than decades or hundreds of years. This opens up new ideas, new perspectives on the topic, which leads to more discussion.

4. To provide hope and uplift, in spite of darkness. To overcome.

I sometimes see this weird idea that an uplifting story needs to not cross some invisible line too far into the dark. In some ways, that couldn’t be further from the truth. As a Harry Potter fan, I’ve had friends come up to me and talk about how they’re disappointed that the stories got darker and darker. Maybe I’m weird (okay, there’s no “maybe” about it), but I like that. I like stories getting dark. I like when they get darker and darker. I like my evil, evil. I want the Voldemort who tries to possess Harry to get Dumbledore to kill him. I want the Voldemort who tortured animals as a small child and who murdered others to split his soul into seven pieces. The world is often an evil place. And how much more powerful is it to overcome the bowels of the most wicked, than it is to overcome a guy who shoplifted? I like my evil, evil. Not because I want to be part of the dark, but because I like seeing people overcome it.

A story that includes dark materials can be just as uplifting, if not more uplifting (because of the contrast) than a story that doesn’t. The idea that a story can’t be dark and inspiring is just unfounded.

Every Christmas season, I become a fan of The Trans-Siberian Orchestra all over again. If you’ve never heard of them, you may still recognize some of their most iconic Christmas songs, some of which have gone viral on synchronized Christmas light videos.

What many people might not realize is that each of their Christmas albums actual tells, and comes with, a written story. If you see the Trans-Siberian Orchestra live, they will read the story to you bits at a time, interspersed with music. But not all their stories are about happy sleigh rides, warm fires, Christmas hams, and decorated trees. There are parents who abandoned their disabled children, babies born addicted to crack, love that has been lost. But the stories and albums are uplifting, not because the creators avoided dark subject matter, but because they illustrated the power of overcoming–overcoming difficult times and personal mistakes. It’s hard to make it through one of their performances with a dry eye through the whole thing.

5. To render reality–others’ reality or your own

But some stories aren’t necessarily meant to be about overcoming the dark or inspiring an audience. Some stories are just about reality. Human nature. The natural man. Experiences that people actually go through. Some stories are simply meant to render, often for reasons 1-3. It’s a statement. It’s meant to create social awareness, empathy. Maybe it’s meant to start a discussion. Those stories need to exist too.

Closing Thoughts

Keep in mind that many audiences only see stories strictly as mediums for entertainment and, on a subconscious level, a reinforcement of a positive, maybe even sugary, feelings and ideas. Those audiences may (on a subconscious level) refuse anything that is otherwise, and consider any mention of the dark and heavies as something that shouldn’t be there. That is their right.

And in some cases, they are correct. Some stories do not need and should not have dark content. It doesn’t serve the purpose of the story, it messes up the tone of the story, and it can ruin what was already working. You wouldn’t, for example, put in a serious plot line in The Office about Pam being legitimately raped. It doesn’t fit.

And with all that said, you shouldn’t feel forced to write content you feel very uncomfortable writing. Your work should reflect the writerly you.

Next week, I’ll talk about how to write about dark things without promoting them.

Headcanon, Danny has ADHD

Okay, maybe it’s because I have ADHD and I like seeing fictional characters that are like me, but hear me out here.

-He has mild inattentive type, more commonly known as just ADD, (no hyperactivity)
-It’s mild, so he doesn’t NEED medication, but maybe he should. He’s not going to though. I’ll bet he hasn’t even been diagnosed.
-Absent-mindedly touching the inside of a high voltage broken machine while walking in? That’s something I would do.
-Hyper focus would definitely help him while fighting.
-He’s really smart but gets bad grades, even when he studies. He finds studying subjects he doesn’t like to be really hard. See: Teacher of the year
-He seems to overreact to some things and has pretty strong emotions. This doesn’t happen with everyone that has ADHD, but it can be an effect. He screams a lot even when he should be used to what is happening. Call me crazy, but it feels like Tucker and Sam are a lot less vocal in battle than he is.
-I don’t think he means to let Sam and Tucker take a lot of blows and let them take the blame. I think he just has slightly less impulse control than the average person and isn’t good at thinking consequences through.
-ADHD can be hereditary and if you think there is absolutely no possible way that Jack has ADHD or a similar illness then I don’t understand your logic.
-Also there’s that theory floating around that ectoplasm is mildly radioactive and/or Maddie being around it while pregnant could have some kind of effects on her kids. This could have led to Danny having a slightly underdeveloped prefrontal cortex, which is what causes ADHD.
-He’s bad at dodging. I too have spaced out during situations where I should have been dodging and either saw the thing coming at me and for some reason didn’t move or just didn’t think about it and got hit. However, when I’m having a good day I’m really good at it. That’s how Danny can honestly say he’s “a whiz at dodgeball” and still get hit as much as he does.
-He’s really smart but misses obvious things. He also thinks out loud a lot. This is something my brother and a few other people I know who also have ADHD do as well.
-A lot of people with inattentive type (including myself) have a hard time making and keeping friends. Will often have either no friends and a few acquaintances or one or two really close ones.
-If you believe the trans Danny headcanons, that can explain why he hasn’t gotten help yet. It’s a lot harder to recognize and diagnose ADHD in girls and people that were socialized as girls.
-He comes up with puns and insults on the spot. Neurotypicals can do that too, but when you have ADHD, your brain often makes seemingly random connections a lot faster than the average person. This helps with making spur of the moment puns and solving mysteries. Remember how he figured out Spectra was a ghost?

So, yeah. That’s my reasoning. I just honestly think that him having ADHD clears up a lot of things about his character. But, I’m not a psychiatrist. I’m just one guy that has ADD. This is just me speculating.
Talks Machina Highlights: Episode 94
  • Denise message: “MY WORDS ARE A SPELL I’M CASTING ON YOU ALL”
  • Everybody will be in next week’s ep for the continuation of Liam’s one-shot!
  • If Pike had been in the Nine Hells, Percy probably would’ve signed the contract secretly as opposed to up-front. She’s the only one who can actually evoke shame in them at this point.
  • Taliesin was planning the entire time to scry on Scanlan and has been trying to make an excuse to steal the Scrying Eye for weeks.
  • Pike’s moment with the earring, talking to Scanlan, was 100% improv.
  • Laura suspects Sam wouldn’t have been able to pull off Scanlan’s departure if Pike had been there. As it was, after the show went on break, Sam felt so bad that he ran over and gave a hug to everyone. If he’d made Pike cry, according to Laura: “he’d be UNFORGIVABLE.”
  • Taliesin semi-bullshitted the Grey Hunt stuff and Matt rolled with it. Taliesin gave him a ride to the airport the next day and they talked about how much they enjoyed how it worked out.
  • Laura points out that she’s the type of gamer who reloaded the game 20 times in ME3 to try to find a way to get a resolution that would be good for everyone when one didn’t exist, and she had that same sense of frustration when she got home after the game. She was really upset over the resolution of the Grey Hunt, but is feeling a bit better knowing it at least wasn’t failure.
  • Ashley and Travis both briefly thought the Grey Hunt was gonna be a weird proposal. Taliesin: “I feel like in our friends group the proposals have been getting more and more ridiculous. That would be the meta-continuation.”
  • Taliesin points out that Percy has a problem with abandonment and the whole thing with Scanlan is hitting his “really serious anger management issues.” Percy was hoping to get Vex’s vague permission/help over the Scanlan thing, and when it wasn’t forthcoming, he changed his plans to be less extreme. Percy’s also dealing with guilt over not feeling useful in the underwater fight, and is displacing that as anger over Scanlan not being there to mitigate that issue.
  • Pike’s got a lot of lingering resentment over Scanlan leaving.
  • Vex would’ve approached the Hunt differently if she’d known more about the creature ahead of time. Everyone decides that it probably killed a lot of small, cute woodland creatures when it threw the tree at Vex.
  • Percy’s most angry about Scanlan leaving the group and abandoning his responsibilities. Everyone else has to deal with the horrible shit going on, but he’s the one who gets to fall apart.
  • Ashley was disappointed not to be in the Hells—she was wondering if she might’ve had a permanent shift in her personality as a result of staying there. Ashley really struggled with playing Pike as a good character early in the home game.
  • Vex was at 10 HP at the end of the Hunt. Taliesin didn’t think there was a real chance of death there, because Matt’s great at building tests that are terribly difficult but not fatal, but was more worried that she was gonna fail. Laura: “God, I would’ve felt like a loser!”
  • Ashley and Laura have both kept themselves from watching the scene that was just Taliesin and Sam and Matt in the room.
  • The idea of leaving with Scanlan crossed Ashley’s mind when she watched the episode, but it’s tough to tell what would’ve happened if she’d been there, because so much of the show is in-the-moment.
  • Vex thinks of Whitestone as home, more than Greyskull.
  • Pike feels some guilt over Scanlan’s departure because of the pranking. “I never thought he would be mad at something like that, of all people.” Percy didn’t feel bad about it, because that’s not where Scanlan’s anger really came from. Pike still feels bad, knowing that.
  • Poor Brian has food poisoning and had to run off-set midway through the show. Ashley jumps in to take over. “Okay, Laura and Ashley. Uh. Me.”
  • Taliesin says Percy and Cassandra don’t really talk about personal things—she probably doesn’t know about Vex, although she suspects. They love each other and all, but they’re not a very warm family. “It’s cold and we live in a castle, for god’s sake.” Laura sums it up: “Cassandra is no Vax.” Percy and Cassandra weren’t super close as kids. “She was a brat.”
  • Brian judges Ashley for not coming up with a funnier excuse for his running off-screen.
  • Vex and Vax have been growing into their own people over the past few months, but Laura doesn’t know how Vex will deal with being in Whitestone without having Vax around, without the comfort of knowing the person she loves most is nearby.
  • Percy has come up with contingency plans for if the other party members go rogue. Brian: “Tell me about it.” Taliesin: “No. They’re in the room.”
  • Vex has an affinity for nature, and while she’s growing accustomed to Whitestone, she’s more comfortable not being around people, because it lets her keep from putting on an act.
  • Before Pike died, her hair was black (with a purple streak), and after she died, her hair turned white.
  • Ashley gets asked about Pike’s parents and grandparents, and there is a story there, but she refuses to answer in case it comes up in the game.
  • Someone asks about Percy breaking his "honesty streak.” Taliesin: “It’s not an honesty streak, it’s just a period of not being caught lying.” Laura: “People think [Percy]’s much better than he is.” 
  • Blurbs on the back of Tary’s book. Percy: “A fascinating addition to the Audubon chronicles of Emon.” Vex: “Don’t believe the lies.” Pike: “I enjoyed the artwork in particular. Great read, but the artwork is fantastic. By the late and great artist, Doty(e), someone whom we used to know.”

Talks Machine in the Dark:

  • If Pike had a companion along the lines of Trinket, it would be a baby snow owl.
  • Taliesin wants fanart of Strawberry Shortcake-esque little animal pets for all of them.
  • Taliesin hasn’t thought about what Grog’s title would entail. “Now that you’ve said it, I’m having thoughts, and they’re all ridiculous and a little mean.”
  • Favorite spells outside their class: all agree that Chromatic Spray is cool. Taliesin misses using Prestidigitation. Brian: “I don’t have that spell because I can’t pronounce it.”
  • Percy smells like sandalwood and gunpowder.
  • After a long debate over which character would win in a Survivor AU, they eventually decide everyone would survive and they’d all do just fine together.
  • Ashley and Laura have matching compass tattoos, along with two more of their friends—they each have a direction.
  • High-school superlatives. Pike: “Best legs.” Percy would have a series along the lines of “President of chess club, president of yearbook club. Most likely to help make the yearbook.” 
Creators Misunderstanding Their Fan Base: Undertale

I love Undertale, so do many others. However, I love Undertale because of the fan base. I have met so many kind and determined individuals that I wouldn’t have met otherwise if not for Undertale. Many of these people are artists, and it’s nice to see the same characters drawn in so many different styles. Even better is when there is a story written about Undertale, a what if this happened instead of this? Great examples of this are Dreamtale, by @jokublog (currently not theirs more about that later), Glitchverse, by @camilaart, and Xtale/Underverse, by Jackei/@xtaleunderverse. There are many more alternate stories/universes I would love to share but I really want to focus on these two right now. As you may or may not know, both these creators make animations/comics based off their story lines, and they are incredible. The amount of effort that goes into each and every frame of animation is jaw dropping to say the least. The story is also pretty great compared to most, especially Glitchtale’s constant subversion of every expectation and Underverse’s imaginative plot and character portrayal are no small feat either. It’s immediately clear that a lot of effort goes into their work to make it as great as possible and create their animations fairly quickly. However, I’m not here to simply sing their praises because the title isn’t “Amazing Undertale Universes You Have To See To Believe” no, this is “Creators Misunderstanding Their Fan Base: Undertale” 

 Recently a story came out about Joku threatening to use her fan base against another person who was just giving feedback on a shirt that they made. This led to them deleting their blog and now it’s being held by a nice individual so that Joku can have the name back if she wants. Joku makes sure people know that she is getting lots of hate over this misbehavior of hers. She’s making it seem like her fan base is full of haters that demand comics every week and don’t care about the person behind the project at all. Her “fans” led her to deleting her blog that she had used for a while now, over one small incident. That’s. Not. True. Joku’s fans are passionate, without a doubt, but they have huge amounts of respect for the amount of work that goes into this complex narrative that Joku is almost always working on. Joku, you’re fans are there, making fan art, liking your posts, and sending positive words your way, but you don’t care about that, do you? You just want to show everyone that you can overcome the haters by yourself, but you can’t, nobody can on their own. You say you ignore the haters, but dealing with what I’ve heard people say about you in silence, isn’t a great idea. If you open up more to your audience, show your real fans that you still care about them, I have no doubt that there will be a shift in the types of people who view your content. I along with many others didn’t hate you for what you did, was it a bit uncalled for? Yea, a little bit, but that one incident with someone WHO’S ALREADY FORGIVEN AND APOLOGIZED FOR MAKING IT PUBLIC, shouldn’t have led to you deleting your blog. The blog is being held for you, your choices are to reset back to zero and build your blog all over again, or quit and leave everyone.

 Jackei, the creator of Xtale and Underverse, is passionate about her work. Her amazing narrative and intense animations make it a joy to experience through and through, but she has her flaws as well. One day you’ll get a hilarious shitpost from Jackei about how she got braces, the next a comic about how she is having to stand against her fans barrage of negativity. I’m saying it right now that there is a difference in HATING and CRITICIZING and it’s easy to tell which is which. Hate usually is opinionated, relying on the same feeling from others to help boost their opinion into more of a fact. Fans that criticize a work however often point out actual problems with the product they were presented with. Maybe the animation was a bit low quality in some places, or maybe the dialog didn’t add anything to the situation, but whatever it is its a real problem that they just shed light on for you. Those fans care, unlike the haters you insist are your fans. Many people really love your intense devotion to your work, making comics often along with incredible animations that have breathtaking moments a plenty, but it sucks when someone you hugely respect talks down to you. You make it clear that whenever you get hate you try to deal with it in silence, and for the most part if you are a strong enough person that works out really well for you. Not only does it improve your image as a creator but it makes fans think much much more of you as a person. However, you show us that side of you way too much, and its clear you want to be that person you portray yourself as. You’ve gotten much better about showing us that you can withstand the hate sent your way, and your shitposts/memes are always a joy to behold, but why not show off the better side of your fan base, the people who really care about you and your work. It’d make a difference in how you view your fans. Just remember Jackei, haters shout loud because they want others to hear them, but when a fan comments, they don’t even expect an answer from anyone.

 Camila is an incredible artist as well, creating a 20 minute animation in less than 4 months is unreal. On top of that the animations feature a standard of quality not usually seen in animations made in the same amount of time. However, Camila is known to harp on people for asking when the latest episode is going to come out. Her response is usually a meme or her telling them to chill and just wait. Camila has the opposite issue that Jackei does, she will show all the asks about when the episode is coming out, making it seem like that’s all her fan base cares about. That and her talking down to her fans often, sometimes calling them stupid for not understanding a small detail in the animation. She’s who Jackei strives to be, impervious to all hate sent her way. To be honest, it’s not the best way to act towards your fans, sometimes people honestly just want to know because they are hyped for the next episode. Especially with the amount of information Camila will spoil about the episode, when in reality it’s mostly misdirection to make hers fans come to one conclusion before the episode even starts, just so she can subvert everyone’s expectations in the end. It’s incredible how many times I knew what would happen just because I followed Camila’s tumblr, @camilaart. Camila, I desperately wanted to donate $50 to you on patreon after you lost part of your house because I desired to talk to the biggest inspiration in my life at the time. To be honest I still want to, but I’m only 15 and I have no income for which to donate to either of you, sorry /;-;/. Camila, your awe inspiring, I just wish you would act more mature and be more loyal to people. After what happened to Jackei you threw her under the bus, reblogging what she said just to garner it more exposure. It’s shocking how many people you turn on after someone comes out with something bad about that person, like Jackei and Ultima almighty. You’re getting much better though about pointing out positive things, like animators and artists who have almost no exposure on youtube, is pretty amazing. It’d be amazing though, if you could use the positives to detract haters instead of memes. You’re a role model for some people whether you want to believe it or not, and sometimes people take anything that role models say as undeniable fact. Your on the right path, please don’t reset again. 

(Everything I said are just my thoughts on these two amazing animators, I just really want to get these out their so that maybe they will both see this post and reflect on themselves as creators. I plan to do more of these but I don’t what topics/people to do yet. And guys, don’t hate these artists just for me pointing out a few things wrong with them, that’s the complete opposite of what I’m trying to say. If you don’t like them, then just ignore them, it’s as simple as that. Thanks for reading this, it truly means a lot to me.) 

((OMG!!! THANK YOU GUYS I MADE A HUGE MISTAKE. I INTENDED TO MAKE IT 3 SECTIONS AND ACCIDENTALLY MADE TWO THE FIRST TIME COMBINING JACKEI AND JOKU I AM SO SORRY!!! THANK YOU FOR POINTING THIS OUT TO ME!))

A thought I had talking to a friend of mine, but:

Suppose that, yes, the Lions and their paladins share virtues, strong facets of their personality, and it makes sense this is how the Alteans describe them because they see the Lions in a rather reverent light.

But considering the nature of the paladin-Lion bond, that kind of immediate, visceral spark of empathy…

What if that’s not what they look for in their paladins at all? Red doesn’t sit back and say “that one, that’s a fighter, he’s Courageous and therefore I want him, he’s Worthy.”

What if what they look for, what they find in their paladin that makes that connection happen… is roughly, shared pain? Fear and uncertainty and insecurity. And the Lions look into the paladins and see shards of themselves, that just hurt for how closely they can understand how that feels.

Maybe Pidge is inquisitive and Pidge is determined and clever and so is Green but what Green sees first is someone who’s lonely. Someone who’s scared. Someone whose wonderful loving family evaporated suddenly who is not feeling quite determined or clever enough to make it in this big scary universe, who wants to find her family, who thinks she can but gosh she’d really love to have a friend along for the ride, someone who understands what that feels like so she doesn’t have to explain (and she’s bad at explaining)

And Green was buried on a foreign planet not knowing if Zarkon was coming for them, knowing the other Lions were out there but utterly unable to reach them, trying as much as she can, but she can’t find a new paladin on this planet, all of her leads wither up without anything to reap from them.

Because it’s easy to look at the outside and say “these are exceptional people. These are magnificent and fearsome beasts” but that kind of deep honest connection Voltron seems to run on isn’t something cultivated by anything so distant and empty as a concept of worth. The Lions aren’t artifacts that choose the righteous. They’re people and while people are drawn to others they share things with- interests, inclinations- I’d argue there’s an inclination in people to seek solidarity in the face of pain and loss. And the Lions, given what we know of their situation before the show, have every reason to feel hurt.

And isn’t that what we see, out of each of the paladins? Before the show starts… they all have their private ghosts. Their private worries. Lance whose biggest accomplishment feels like it doesn’t count because it was Keith’s slot in the fighter class, he’s just a replacement. Hunk who can’t be confident and enjoy his own area of expertise because everything’s shaking and moving and oh god he’s not ready for this. Pidge who gives up so much to find her family but can’t because the smoking gun, the information she needs- is not on Earth and she’s tense and defensive and shutting everyone out. Keith who’s living alone in a tiny little shack in the middle of nowhere with no one checking in on him or possibly even talking to him. Shiro, alone, imprisoned, and scared not even knowing if alienating his only friend was worth it and saved someone.

Scattered, vulnerable, endangered. Outmatched by their opponents. Not living up to everything they can be.

Just like the Lions themselves.

something to remember about skam is that people often redeem themselves without explicitly saying sorry
obviously people have different opinions on whether this is okay, but jonas, for example, has never to our knowledge, explicitly apologised for being homophobic in s1, he redeemed himself by educating himself. same with isak, he never actually said sorry to even for what he said in the locker room. its always an implied thing that people forgive each other because they recognise the apology is in their actions rather than their words, in jonas defending the guy when isak called him an “ultrahomse” or in isak running across oslo to tell even “du er ikke alene” etc etc instead of saying “im sorry i did this thing that was bad”
so i think we might not get any explicit apologies from the girl squad, but this doesnt necessarily mean they cant redeem themselves in other ways

If you’ve got the time and the inclination, what’s to stop you showing up on the hour at any lecture hall at any university and becoming the guest lecturer? Nothing, that’s what! Professors are always late and campus police don’t know the difference. All you need to do is walk in and get talking.

“What’s this class all about?” is a great opener. While you wait for someone to raise their hand and say “noses”, or “smelling”, or “science”, draw a big rectangle on the blackboard. You can always use a rectangle.

When some kid says “Last week the professor said we’d be looking neurological processing of olfactory stimuli,” you can shake your head and smile and say “just explain it to me like I’m 10 years old.”

This time they’ll definitely say “smelling”, and you can turn that rectangle on the blackboard into a truck.

“Imagine a truck,” you could say. “It’s parked on your top lip. And when you smell something, the men load up all that smelling information into the back of the truck. Who can tell me what comes next?”

Wait for them to say “they drive the truck up your nose,” then say “Exactly! They begin the perilous journey up your nose. They’ll dodge all the boogers and thick black hairs, and finally they’ll arrive at your brain.”

Next, discredit the professor who’s walked in. “You slept with a student!” is a classic for a reason. Even if he hasn’t, he won’t stick around to argue the point!

“When the truck arrives at the brain, the men unload the truck and they show all the smells to the loading dock workers. They decide whether something is a good smell or a bad smell. Sometimes, the workers get confused. Like people who think poop smells good! We’ve all got a friend like that. Who thinks that, by a show of hands?”

If no one raises their hand, you could try saying “It’s natural… how bad can a substance produced naturally by the human body be? It’s normal to be curious. What about you,” and here you want to point at someone in the front row, “you might be interested to know that I have a very natural diet. That means a great texture and aroma.”

If there are no takers, you probably still have half an hour to get to the next lecture hall. Good luck!

GUYS WHAT ARE YOU EVEN DOING!?!?!

THIS ^
WHAT IS THIIISSSSSS

FOR THE CEREAL WITH YOGURT LOVE I CAN’T BELIEVE ALL THESE PEOPLE ARE FOLLOWING ME NUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU ;_;

I’ve been feeling kinda bad because I’d like to add more content to this blog, but I’m working in other stuff… when I finish them I could show you…also with all these followers I’d like to start telling you more about my personal projects AASHAFHDKJDHAJKSDHKJASD Thank you!!! Thank you so much I feel so glad and happy  I don’t know what to say just THANK YOU <3