wfulatin

thesis update

So maybe I don’t hate research at all and I just need someone helpful to keep me pointed in the right direction.

We’ve been discussing Plato and rhetoric and body metaphor and ethics and physics and metaphysics and

this is why I love studying classics because it is, without exaggeration, all of the things. 

Ahead this week, I begin reading Περὶ μιμήσεως (in Greek!).

Phyllis Auentinae quaedam est uicina Dianae, /sobria grata parum: cum bibit omne decet./ altera Tarpeios est inter Teia lucos/ candida, sed potae non satis unus erit.
— 

Phyllis of Aventine is a certain neighbor to Diana,
hardly bearable sober: when she drinks, anything goes. 
the other woman was Teia among the Tarpeian groves,
she was bright, but one man was not enough for her drunk.

S. Propertius, Elegies IV poem 8

my translation based on L. Richardson Jr’s text and commentary Propertius

Honors Thesis

Just found out that not only am I definitely doing an honors thesis in Latin next year, but also that basically my FAVORITE PROFESSOR in the department is my advisor.

Although actually I would probably have been similarly ecstatic about any of my professors. 

Nonetheless I needed to express my joy somewhere.

εἰ δὲ τις τὸ μὲν προγνῶναι δυνατὸν ἡγεῖται, τὸ δὲ φυλάξασθαι ἀδύνατον, τοῦ χάριν ἐσπούδακεν εἰδέναι τὸ δὲ γενησόμενον, ὅσπερ καὶ ἀγνουο῀ντος καὶ γογνώσκοντος ἔσται;
— 

“On the other hand, if someone thinks that forecasting is possible, but guarding against the future is impossible, why is he so keen to know what is going to happen, when it will happen whether he knows it or not?”

-Phalaris, letter to Gorgias

From Greek and Latin Letters: an Anthology with Translation, ed. Micheal Trapp. Cambridge Press, 2003.

ad celebrandam linguam latinam

hodie est SPEAK YOUR OWN LANGUAGE DAY!

sed ego linguam latinam non loquor quasi Romanus ciuis. utinam lingua latina uiuat aeterne! 

today i also have to write a letter in latin for my latin class of the semester. it’s gone well so far, i think. i’d be using latin right now except that i was trained classically and “class,” “assignment,” and other such vocabulary are tough to come by without making up words or breaking from classical norms.

how I felt sitting down to my roman comedy final

it was written to take 3.5 hours 

but keep in mind that we had a midterm written to take an hour or less that ended up taking at least an hour and a half.

plus, iambic senarius/trochaic septinarius/iambic octinarius/cantica to scan having been left to learn them on our own yay

adventures in Propertius

you guyz its that time in the semester that I write a research paper for Age of Augustus so CLEARLY I’m going to look at Propertius again

because love elegy is glorious and if i’m going to relate something to Augustan law I should at least enjoy it

Meter.

 FRIGGIN ROMAN COMEDY HAS ALL THE METERS THAT ARE DIFFICULT TO LEARN BECAUSE THEY’RE ALL THE SAME BUT NOT AT ALL AND TODAY I LEARNED IT I THINK I FIGURED IT OUT.

iambic meters have a default short long foot.

trochaic meters have a default long short foot.

BUT “short” is really an anceps.

AND “long” can sometimes be replaced by 2 shorts. 

senarius is six, septinarius is 7, octinarius is 8 feet.

last foot is always long short long.