wewoka

The Social Trade-offs of Risk Management

by Jake Davis, Editor-in-Chief

Wewoka–

Wewoka–The past couple of articles that I have written were about the Risk Management process.  To recap the importance of Risk Management, here are a few key points:

1. Taking on risks is necessary to pursue opportunities for development. The risk of inaction may well be the worst option of all.

2. To confront risk successfully, it is essential to shift from unplanned responses when crises occur to proactive, systematic, and integrated risk management.

3. Identifying risks is not enough: the trade-offs and obstacles to risk management must also be identified, prioritized, and addressed through private and public action.

4. Risk management requires shared action and responsibility at different levels of society.

5. Governments have a critical role in managing systemicrisks, enabling an environment for shared action, shared responsibility, and channeling direct support to vulnerable areas.

 As I promised in my last article, I am going to discuss the trade-offs in the Risk Management process.

To begin, there are 5 levels of Risk Management:

Individual

Household

Community

Business

Government

Each of these levels have a responsibility to the others.  On that same token each is dependent on the others as well.

For example  individuals’ own efforts, initiative, and responsibility are essential for managing risk, their success will be limited without a supportive external environment. 

People can successfully confront risks that are beyond their means by sharing their risk management with others. 

By pooling risk collectively through various overlapping social and economic systems, the ability to maintain a safe and advantageous environment can be attainable.

There still are rules that the individual must abide by in order to maintain a functional relationship with these systems.

This is what it means to have Risk Management trade-offs.


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The household is no different in possessing the primary instance of support, pooling resources, protecting its members—especially the vulnerable (young, elderly, ill).

Still there are certain rules within the community that must be adhered to, while the community, businesses, and government provide such support as water, sewage, jobs, and morale to help maintain the household.

Communities provide informal networks of insurance and protection, helping people deal with pandemic risks and pooling resources to confront common risks.


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Businesses can help absorb shocks and exploit the opportunity side of risk, contributing to more stable employment, growing income, and greater innovation and productivity.

An example of this in an indirect way is how the water filter station on 8th and Mekesukey helped everyone with fresh water to drink while the city said water that was darker than the lake water was “drinkable.” And for that I believe that we are all thankful.

The government  has the scale and tools to manage systemic risks at the international, national and regional levels, to provide an enabling environment for the other systems to function, and to provide direct support to vulnerable people in trade for taxes and support for ventures and ideas.

These systems have mutual interactions, often complementing and sometimes substituting for each other’s risk management functions. 

The importance of these systems changes with the level of the development of their relationships. In less advanced systems, informal mechanisms tend to be more prevalent and the relative roles of the household and the community are larger. 

As countries advance—and informal mechanisms give way to formal ones—the importance of the contributions from the business sector and the government systems grow. 

No matter what level of Risk Management the crisis hits (usually all of them simultaneously, but sometimes just a few) there are some guidelines that stand the test, and these are:

1. Do not generate uncertainty or unnecessary risks

2. Provide the right incentives for people and institutions to do their own planning and preparation, while taking care not to impose risks or losses on others

3. Keep a long-run perspective for risk management by building institutional mechanisms that transcend political cycles

4. Promote flexibility within a clear and predictable institutional framework

5. Protect the vulnerable, while encouraging self-reliance and preserving fiscal sustainability

When Risk Management fails it can be catastrophic, such as in the case of Picher, Oklahoma. 

Picher, now a ghost town, was called by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the most toxic place in America. 


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Once the most productive lead and zinc mining area in the world, today stands empty with enormous piles of lead-laced mine waste.

The mining ceased in 1967 due to contaminated water from the mines turning the local creek red. 

levels of lead were found in blood and tissue of residents, cancer levels skyrocketed, and three quarters of the Picher’s elementary school students were reading below grade level.


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The area was declared the Tar Creek Superfund site in 1981 by the EPA.

Here is where Risk Management failed.  The mine shut down, the EPA gave the residents money to move, but most of the residents didn’t leave until 2006 when studies found that most of the town was in eminent danger of collapsing into the mines further adding to the aforementioned negative effects of lead poisoning.

Furthermore the town was deemed too toxic to clean up, and a federal buyout program paid people to leave. 

The city’s post office  closed in July 2009, and the city ceased operations as a municipality on Sept. 1, 2009.

The only thing that was left was 6 lived in homes and a pharmacist (who passed away in 2010 due to lead-induced illness).

All of the illnesses could have been avoided with a proper risk management system and a little common sense.  But nothing was done with any urgency.  Decades of just letting the crisis fester killed thousands and hurt thousands more.

With the problems that Wewoka is having with water, the same thing could happen.

Unless we initiate a common sense approach to Risk Management.

There will be more articles on Risk Management in the future, but don’t be afraid to go back and read the other ones or The World Development Report 2014 & 2015 to find more information about Risk Management.


Colt Clark

  • Missing Since Apr 20, 2006
  • Missing From Wewoka, OK
  • DOB May 24, 1996
  • Age Now 18
  • Sex Male
  • Race White
  • Hair Color Brown
  • Eye Color Hazel
  • Height 4’4”
  • Weight 65 lbs

Colt’s photo is shown age-progressed to 16 years. He was last seen on April 20, 2006. He was last seen wearing blue jeans, a sky-blue shirt, and white and blue tennis shoes. Colt wears glasses and has a scar above his left eyebrow.

Seminole County Sheriff’s Office (Oklahoma) 1-405-382-9340

5 Years Later …

SEMINOLE, Oklahoma — It has been five years to the day since 9-year-old Colton Clark went missing in Seminole. But for his grandmother, Jerry Clark, it still feels a lot longer.

“Its a hard day,” said Clark, who lives in Nicoma Park.

Colton disappeared April 20, 2006. Clark said she believes Colton is dead but continues to pray his body is found so they can have a proper burial and some closure.

Current Seminole County Sheriff Shannon Smith said his deputies are still following up on every lead they get. In fact, several new leads have come up in the past year, including a possible sighting of Colton in New Mexico. But Sheriff Smith said all those leads led to a dead end.

“We hope we find him alive,” said Sheriff Smith. “But if he’s not, we want to find his body so the family can have closure. The little guy deserves a proper burial.”

The Oklahoma Bureau of Investigation was also called in to investigate. OSBI spokesperson Jessica Brown said the case is not a cold case, but an open and active one.

What is Wewoka Made of Demographically?

by Jake Davis, Editor-in-Chief

The United States Census Bureau says that the population of Wewoka is 8,023.  Obviously this is counting the area surrounding Wewoka and not in city limits.  However, it is safe to say that all of these people at some point in time during the day, week, or month visit Wewoka and spend money with at least one of the businesses here.
Population

Total Population 8,023


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Housing Status ( in housing units unless noted )

Total 3,835

Occupied 3,044

Owner-occupied 2,222

Population in owner-occupied ( number of individuals ) 5,663

Renter-occupied 822



Population in renter-occupied ( number of individuals ) 2,101

Households with individuals under 18973

Vacant 791

Vacant: for rent 179

Vacant: for sale 60


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Population by Sex/Age

Male 3,953

Female 4,070

Under 18  2,035

18 & over  5,988

20 - 24 405

25 - 34 829

35 - 49 1,556

50 - 6 41,651

65 & over 1,322


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Population by Ethnicity

Hispanic or Latino 237

Non Hispanic or Latino 7,786


 

Population by Race

White 5,015

African American 754

Asian 26

American Indian and Alaska Native 1,627

Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander 0

Other 91

Identified by two or more 510



This is coming straight from the 2010 Census and the Census Bureau website.  These are the numbers that the Federal government uses to classify, fund, and register the city of Wewoka with.  


So why does Wewoka feel so empty?  This statistic right here:

Housing Status ( in housing units unless noted )

Vacant                                791

Vacant: for rent                    179

Vacant: for sale                    60


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This means that there are 552 houses in Wewoka that there is no plan to use.  Such a large number of either unlivable or vacated homes just sitting empty and taking up space. Some cities have taken to tearing down such buildings and putting up, for example, mini golf courses (taken from Facebook profile: Revive Wewoka).  This could provide an attraction to the city from surrounding areas youth, as there are no other such facilities in the area.  And that is a good idea, how better to erase the reputation that the older generation has about this city, than by inviting a new generation of Seminole County residents to create new memories in this city.  


Other ideas that could benefit this city are welcome, and will receive equal, fair, and unbiased reporting from the Chronicle.  Just go to the submissions page (link on the left [3 bars at the top mobile]) and submit your story, idea, or private comment and I will handle the matter with urgency.


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I met Margie waiting in line at the Wewoka post office. She’s 80 but doesn’t look it to me. When I tell her about my travels she says she used to walk 4 miles everyday, but that all changed as she got older. “This old body ain’t what it used to be; now I’m falling apart." 

On the road you meet new people everyday and sometimes I feel more like a vessel than a person. It’s amazing the things people tell you when it’s likely they will never see you again—about their lazy stepson who’s a dope head hiding out in their home trying to evade warrants, how they kidnapped their granddaughter and moved to Alaska because they didn’t want her raised by a black man, the time their husband cheated with the blonde at work, a Christian family struggling with the death of their gay son; the stories flow like water.

It’s overwhelming sometimes but I’m grateful when people open up like that. The strange part is that no one really knows who you are, yet I carry around all of their stories. I think of the folk song by Pauline Baez and Mimi & Richard Fariña, Pack-up Your Sorrows:

"Well, if somehow you could pack up your sorrows, and give them all to me. You would lose them, I know how to use them, Give them all to me.”

What is Wewoka Made of Demographically?

by Jake Davis, Editor-in-Chief

The United States Census Bureau says that the population of Wewoka is 8,023.  Obviously this is counting the area surrounding Wewoka and not in city limits.  However, it is safe to say that all of these people at some point in time during the day, week, or month visit Wewoka and spend money with at least one of the businesses here.
Population

Total Population 8,023


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Housing Status ( in housing units unless noted )

Total 3,835

Occupied 3,044

Owner-occupied 2,222

Population in owner-occupied ( number of individuals ) 5,663

Renter-occupied 822



Population in renter-occupied ( number of individuals ) 2,101

Households with individuals under 18973

Vacant 791

Vacant: for rent 179

Vacant: for sale 60


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Population by Sex/Age

Male 3,953

Female 4,070

Under 18  2,035

18 & over  5,988

20 - 24 405

25 - 34 829

35 - 49 1,556

50 - 6 41,651

65 & over 1,322


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Population by Ethnicity

Hispanic or Latino 237

Non Hispanic or Latino 7,786


 

Population by Race

White 5,015

African American 754

Asian 26

American Indian and Alaska Native 1,627

Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander 0

Other 91

Identified by two or more 510



This is coming straight from the 2010 Census and the Census Bureau website.  These are the numbers that the Federal government uses to classify, fund, and register the city of Wewoka with.  


So why does Wewoka feel so empty?  This statistic right here:

Housing Status ( in housing units unless noted )

Vacant                                791

Vacant: for rent                    179

Vacant: for sale                    60


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This means that there are 552 houses in Wewoka that there is no plan to use.  Such a large number of either unlivable or vacated homes just sitting empty and taking up space. Some cities have taken to tearing down such buildings and putting up, for example, mini golf courses (taken from Facebook profile: Revive Wewoka).  This could provide an attraction to the city from surrounding areas youth, as there are no other such facilities in the area.  And that is a good idea, how better to erase the reputation that the older generation has about this city, than by inviting a new generation of Seminole County residents to create new memories in this city.  


Other ideas that could benefit this city are welcome, and will receive equal, fair, and unbiased reporting from the Chronicle.  Just go to the submissions page (link on the left [3 bars at the top mobile]) and submit your story, idea, or private comment and I will handle the matter with urgency.


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June 27
Camping near the Indian Church in Wewoka

I’m walking by a golf course looking for a place to camp on the edge of town. It’s getting late and I’m nervous about finding a spot. Matthew McConaughey’s twin brother rides up in a golf cart and gives me a few bottles of water. He’s impressed with my rig, I wonder if I’m delirious from the heat.

A lady around my age comes out of a nearby house and she too is curious about me and the cart setup. We get to talking and she lets me camp in the back yard. Sheila is her name.

Pretty tickled by the situation, she comments, "You hear about these things on TV and never think it’ll happen to you, Maybe we’ll be on TV.“ 

The Key Theater in downtown Wewoka was host to many a movie in it’s hayday.  Dedicated to General William Shaffer Key of the Oklahoma National Gaurd, the theater is no longer open.

“The Whipping Tree” is where the tribal government of the Seminole Nation would punish offenders, hanging them by their bound hands and beating them until the couldn’t stand.  This form of punishment has been outlawed.  The tree, however, stands as a chilling reminder of how far civilization has come.  Is it time to cut it down?

The March City Council Meeting Was All About Change

By Jake Davis, Editor-in-Chief
March 11, 2014

Wewoka–City Manager Mark Mosley began the Wewoka City Council Meeting expressing the need to name the addition and the streets adjacent to the recently approved hotel. He said that he would accept Indian words that emit prosperity.

Tonights city council meeting announced that April 8th, 2014 will be the last council meeting for Mayor King, and April 21st will be day one for  Paige Sheffield.  Mayor King will be coming to the end of her second term residing over the city of Wewoka.  Her tenure saw new businesses, a power plant, animal rights legislation and the cleaning of several areas of the city that needed renovation.  April 21st will also begin our annual Clean-Up Week instituted by Mayor King as well.

The Seminole Nation Dept. of Transportation announced that they would be applying for Tiger Grants to build sidewalks for the school & public transportation for next year. Their emphasis was on safety, by this they mean making sidewalks disability compliant, creating a safe route to school for everyone, and a safe route between football field and school.  Maybe someone could do something about the glare on jfhdjdn behind the stadium. Lewis Johnson the Asst. Chief of The Seminole Nation expressed interest in the high school auditorium unofficially saying that a concert would increase local tourism.  Chief Johnson is an Indian Flute player that Councilwoman Elwanger spoke highly of.  The City Council also announced that the Seminole Nation donated $7500 for a recently purchased Drug Dog and a training trip for an officer.

April 30th will be Law Day USA, the day that local African-American attorney James “Coody” Johnson petitioned that the United States Government recognize the law profession and the laws which they arbitrate.  Annually the city of Wewoka celebrates this day, maybe with new laws a “big” celebration can be taxed.

The council also approved the Donation of a three phase water park at “Mutt” Miller Park.  Phase one will be a splash pad, phase two will be a ‘Jungle-Gym’ style water fountain for children to play in, with renovation to the parks restroom and parking lot.  Another donation by a Bluffview resident will build a recreational structure to that park, but it will not be a water park because of water pressure.  No additions will be made to the Westside Park due to no donations. 

The parks have always been a source of controversy in Wewoka.  They represent the three economic classes in Wewoka:  Rich, Poor, and Black.  Each class attempts to gain city funding to restore the luster that the city once had.  This translates to outside businesses and those with vested interest in this community along with the rest of the demographics that differentiate Wewoka from more prosperous cities. Stories of the parties from the 90’s (when twerkin’ began, see Yikeing) would shock the campfiire since mass congregation has been banned. 1000 Black teens to 30 somethings having a good time with family and playing basketball was banned because the council then feared the black gangster stories from the news.  The Whites partied at a couple of locations North of town called Sandy Beach and UFO (because the burm looks like a UFO landed).   White kids had a murder rate too. Indians partied out in the woods too, and also had their fare share of sad events.  The difference in the reality that we wanted, and the one that we have is that we have what we have done; and to that end we will have what we will go get.

On the agenda for next month, will be new housing incentive and 150 year anniversary of Wewoka. 

Wewoka: A Place of Possibility

By Jake Davis, Editor-in-Chief
April 30th, 2014

Wewoka–20 years ago Wewoka still had a few businesses downtown, but they had been slowly leaving over the years.  The gangsters of the 1930’s & 40’s left a mark on the reputation of the town that made it rotten inside out. 

Like most towns, rivals parlayed propaganda and ignorance into or community.  Unfortunately, Wewoka couldn’t shake the blues and our population and visitors dwindled to oblivion.  

Corruption, stupidity, ignorance, and laziness stagnated infrastructural integrity.  Grades dropped and crime rose.  Recently the crime rate has home down significantly, and for a long time that is what the problem was. But now, other problem is much deeper.  

Socially, educationally, and technologically Wewoka stands behind a long line of those rival towns.   There are no place for people to congregate, which severely reduced the amount of out of town commerce.   Our schools have the lowest grades in the county.   Facebook only has 1000 profiles out of the possible 8027 people that live in the land track.  Twitter only has about a hundred.

The closing of Wewoka not only closed stores, but closed minds.  One of the reasons why I wanted to open a newspaper here was to have the daily news again.   The Seminole Producer doesn’t give fair representation to Wewoka, and, rightfully they are from Seminole and that is where their honor lies. 

To dedicate this paper to the betterment of Wewoka is not only a sentence that draws attention, it’s commitment to making this town what it was supposed to be when I graduated from high school in 1994.  We where a small class packed between two larger more outspoken classes.  More boys than girls, there was little chance for romance between us to have reason to build future within Wewoka.

If I could go back and do it over again, I would make a lot of changes.  I would have volunteered more, shared more, and, more importantly did more to make Wewoka a home for me.

Rumors and gossip ruined any chance of having the hometown that I knew as a child be a comfortable place that my children (I have four, and none of them live here) could live in.

Token gestures of faith are not what I am offering you,  I am painting a picture.  This picture depicts Wewoka as most graduates who move away see when they come back.  You could call it the propaganda from their new towns, but literally the lifestyle in Wewoka is a gamble.

I am not trying to close the Casino, but there has got to be more adult congregation than the Vice industry (Gambling, Guns, Prostitution, and Drugs) for adults to meet, relate, and evolve.

Growth is subjective to opinion.  My opinion about prostitution is that it should not exist.  That doesn’t mean that it’s going to go away.  Prostitutes have the opinion that their customers (Tricks or Johns) need to be wholly dependant upon their sex.  Again, my opinion stands.

Selfishness and laziness are just a couple of problems that Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy"  Floyd and John Dillinger’s flamboyant lifestyles that infiltrated city government and eventually drained Wewoka of it’s reputation.  The resources are still intact.  

Theories about how to rebuild Wewoka are probably as numerous and diverse as our population, which  has started to regrow.   50 jobs (what the TMCO grant reportedly brought) are not gonna cut it for 7% of 8027 (562) people who need jobs.  Worrying about what these people could eventually do, doesn’t show them a different path like more jobs would.

My Grandparents always told me that when you put something out there, you will bring it back.  My grandfather, Cpl. Floyd Alan Davis T.E.C. V,  was awarded a Congressional Gold Medal, My grandmother cared for people that lived in a nursing home up until she was 80.  Selflessness and honor were two important morals that they gave me.   What would it hurt to shape your world in a way that will help you and others.

My hope is that Wewokan’s see that the war is over and the world is still here regardless of what the rest of the world says.  Join me in my cause to Renovate Wewoka in a positive way so that the convoluted opinions of the rival towns can’t KILL Wewoka with ignorance.


You never know what you are going to get, if you don't at least look at it.

by Jake Davis
Thursday May 29th, 2014

Wewoka–Today was like every other day, I fielded Facebook™ posts from disgruntled/readers telling me I was bashing Wewoka with some pictures of neglected areas of Wewoka.  My point is, if you sell Wewoka as/a heaven, the buyers can’t find the H-E-double hockey sticks.  The sooner we get this cleaned up, the less likely that the prospective businesses will find the parts of the city that would likely run them off.

One of the readers went as far to post my criminal record, that has been grossly misproportioned,  only to prove my point in several arguments that I am not a thug.  Mostly they were blindly throwing out questions of my integrity and showing the world that they have no care for cleanliness in their own home.  

Something struck me as ironic…That these people obviously are not reading the paper, but they still would put their foot in their mouth as if they were going to get something out of it.  

I can’t say I am not a genius, my IQ is 136 (that’s 16 points above genius level).  In the fourth grade it was 118 when I was accepted into PEAK (Pupils Excelling Academically in the Curriculum).  I could see that most of these people, who work manual labor and secretarial jobs had a deep-seeded resentment for those of us who went to school and got an education so that we could get the less physically demanding jobs.  

The one thing that really impacted me about this round of arguments was that they don’t know what the world could have had in store for them if they had just stuck it out just a little bit longer in school.   There is no substitute for a good education.

I don’t claim to be the Pied Piper of college,  I just want to see everyone  do well in life.  Whether you work in a factory or are the President, I want to see you, and others, living full lives in a meaningful sense.

So why is it that millions of high school students graduate, but only hundreds of thousands go to college from state to state?  In my opinion, the misconception of instant gratification shows them a quick buck, and then there is the low sense of self-worth that neglected areas of any community emits.

Take a shower, get a haircut, or get some new clothes and the feeling there is of freshness.  That is something that abandoned buildings, overgrowth, and bird poop can’t do.  Newness is a way to create good morale, not the same old passing the buck and kissing up to the non-participant officials that block the other ones.

To bring Wewoka out of the depression that it is in could spawn new emotions for the Wewoka that we remember and love.  Who knows what type of businesses have been held back because of the fear of the lack of participation?  All of them.

People who live in the fairy tale world have no sense of reality, but they always impose their obsessive-compulsive opinions on those who could make change because they are afraid of nothing but CHANGE.

Wewoka changed from what it was to what it is.  We can change it to what Wewoka will be.

Cold, Cold, Cold!!!

by Jake Davis, Editor-in-Chief

November 17th, 2014

Wewoka–This weeks cold snap is the result of a weather phenomenon known as a Bomb Cyclone.  Arctic air unusually pushes it’s way south, faster and farther than usual. 

Freezing cold temperatures, snow, and ice are the only thing you can when a bomb cyclone hits.  Luckily, it’s just cold here.

Thank God that it waited until after Sorghum Day to get here or the day would have been extremely miserable. 

Instead it was a day filled with fun, family, and food;  three f’s that this scholar does not mind.

Sorghum Day in the downtown area has been a mainstay on the last Saturday in Wewoka for as long as I can remember.  Sadly we had to overlook the boarded up storefronts and pidgeon poop to taste Faith Johnson’s delightful cupcakes and candies (I still can’t figure out how my classmate from WHS ‘94 makes balls of cake.)

But we did, and gladly so.

Many people in the area have expressed concern over the future of Wewoka.  Business migration has taken it’s toll on the city.  What was shoulder to shoulder when I was a kid, has been sparsely populated lately. 

This past Sorghum Day had more people than last year, which has wives happy that the cupcakes were more popular than the two (2) Thunder Cheerleaders (who were only there for 30 minutes of photographs, hardly enough time for a single man to get close to them.)  

What could make Wewoka feel like home again?  The downtown area great for a parade.  The only problem is that it makes Wewoka look like a ghost town when we corral  thousands of people into the shell of a business district.

So how can we change this?  The simple answer is to bring more businesses into the empty buildings. 

Easier said than done.

Another option is to move the festivities to another venue like the football field, or the fairgrounds, maybe the lake in April around the actual founding date of the city. 

In a year and a half,  it will be the 150th anniversary of the day that  Freedman “Gopher” John “Horse” Coheia decided to get a township marker in his name on his property to form the first black incorporated town west of the Mississippi River.

Wewoka (Seminole for “barking waters”) has had many years of  both positive and negative history which has divided the town socially, and racially. 

Some say that the city should close (a proposed shall mine, offered as salvation, threatens to destroy our environment), that the empty buildings should get destroyed for a movie since the 1980’s.

The truth is that if some 'paint is not put on the fence,'  the lookey-loos will think that we don’t care about this city and more negative offers will make their way here, buying their future by killing our past. 

Kids in a small town are always going to dream of moving to the big city.  But until they get a since of something great happened in their lives, they don’t have the memories that we have. 

The surroundings tell the story about why they want to escape.  Nowhere in Wewoka will you find an area that kids, even adults, can say I am proud to be from here.

Maybe it’s because you were distracted and didn’t see all of the businesses leaving.  Maybe there are forces at work that want to hide what Wewoka has become.

Whatever the reason, change is needed.  No egotistical  attitude will fix the pain that we feel when we look at what our memories became. 

Many sides (not just two) can point the finger at who is to blame.  That’s not going to solve the problem.

Being cold to one another doesn’t solve the problem.  I ask you to recognize the “REAL” negative issues that plague Wewoka and share them with us on TheWewokaChronicle.com. 

Just click comment on any item and share (use Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+, Tumblr, Dribbler, or 500px, to login; or you can comment anonymously.) 

This is not something to take lightly.  Some problems you might face due to inaction include, but are not limited to:

Car Problems (bad roads)

Health Problems (water)

Risk Loss (lowered property value)

Social Deindividualization (prostitution and gambling addition due to the lack of viable entertainment outlets)

The solution is to communicate and work together to remember the good times that this city has seen and not to place blame on anyone (deserved, or not) so that change is possible.

The City has a Drainage Problem.


by Jake Davis, Editor-in-Chief
June 21st, 2014

Wewoka–It’s Summer again and the rain,  the streets, and opinions are all coming together to form the ‘utopia" we call Wewoka.  How is it that within a system that has received a Dept. of Commerce grant to build a green building for TMCo. and drill an oil well in the sum total of a million $$Dollars$$ 1000000USD, that no one could fix the drainage problems?   No new jobs, no work program, no incentive for youth to work, no sense of entitlement. 

Spending money within the tax system, meaning allowing new groups of tax payers to find sustenance through the money spent wisely, has to be done responsibly.  Matters of creating taxes to be collected from spending tax $$Dollars$$ USD is a concept that started through George W. Bush and continued with Barrack Obama through the stimulus program.

Well driven into the psyche, lexicon, and moral value of this community is not  to make bad public decision.   Privately, a more controllable approach to systemic risk management can be developed.  Proverbs 18:1 A man who isolates himself seeks after his own desires he rages against all wise judgement.~Solomon.

The wisdom of this community has been to push ahead, but what held progress back.   No review process.  We are not a military, militia, or militant.  To review in the context that I stated, is to chronicle the progress of whatever you do.  This way you see what works, and what you should change.

The relation of moral value and notable public fare is notorious for lie -ing to lesser educated people to save them the time and the embarrassment of being wrong or sounding illiterate.  I have always found it more beneficial to find out myself.  So why is information on the internet sketchy at best about Wewoka?

I see a lot about Marcus Gardley’s “The Road Weeps and the Well Runs Dry,” but what about Henry Alexander, Law Day U.S.A. and Gopher John.   The city website says that there are only 15 officers under Chief Gregory Brooks and Mayor Evelyn King, a “Free Land” Program and that Elijah Brown was the founder (ask someone who has taken freshman Oklahoma History who that was).

According to Sigmund Freud, man is led by his surroundings.  So when it is the responsibility of a group to maintain the surroundings, it is due to them the successes and faults of the citizens around.  And to that effect the opportunities that grant the prior.  

The problems with drainage exemplify the standards of process that have plagued this community like this:


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Wewoka Chronicle:  The City’s Drainage Problem

Wewoka:  This will not do.

Wewoka Government:  It’ll dry up.

Wewoka:  What about the mosquitoes?

All jokes aside, there is a boarded up store front between 2nd & 3rd street On Wewoka street that has no roof and no floor to cover its basement.  I call it a “mosquito hatchery.”   Seminole street has two big ones that often stall cars.   Most often are the big puddles in front of the driveways.

To excuse this type of negligence would be easy with the crime rate and all, but where are the opportunities?  The Byrne Grant.  The Byrne Grant is a grant given to police departments by the federal government.  The criteria for this grant is that the city have a high crime rate.  Our low grades in schools, high infidelity rate, and casino greed factor make us prime candidates.


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As a community we have the responsibility of caring for the city and it’s required utilities.  Terrorists target them, because we need them.  What can’t we as a community take the responsibility that Mark Mosley could not, and renovate the city in a way that represents us. 

Even if you planned on leaving town,  you would want to come back to revisit your memories.  You can’t if the town dries up.

Passing the buck and moral apathy tend to be leaned on by the majority of immoral scoundrels that call themselves funny television characters that were meant to ridicule and expose them to the public authority.  My concern is that no one cares about the well-being of this community only the selfish notion that they are more important than their own goals.

Throughout history men and women have become respected and compensated for developing strong relationships within communities through community renovation, systemic risk management and the setting of goals.

The goal of this article, obviously, is to get a hold on the mosquito population.   The goal of my newspaper is to make Wewoka a great place to live starting with your support.  Financially,  the support of my readers could end up creating a job skills training program for software, clerical, and warehouse certifications, along with the creation of a festival committee.

But Wewoka has to have a good surrounding environment to fill the place.  An influx of tourism could bring some well-earned tax dollars starting with your donation to renovate Wewoka’s atmosphere. 

The goal is $500,000 for drainage, alley ways to bike trails, and sidewalks.   To donate by credit card, click on the button below.  To donate by check, email a photo of your signed check to WewokaChronicleEditor@gmail.com. To donate cash call 405 585 6224.