western traditional

  • what she says: I'm fine
  • what she means: why is Dorian Gray never played by people with blond hair? why is Dorian always depicted as all pale and dark? oscar literally describes his hair as gold like two seconds after we meet him. directors apparently feel like they have to make Dorian look dark dangerous and brooding, but he's not supposed to look dark and dangerous and brooding. That's the whole point. No one ever suspects him because he looks like an innocent little cherub with golden curls and rosy cheeks. His physical appearance is described with terms that Western literary tradition, during the nineteenth century in particular, associated with goodness and godliness, and this is intentionally juxtaposed with the blackness of his soul. If you intentionally play him as someone who looks like a Byronic hero, much of the symbolism of his character is lost, right?

Iiiiiiit’s that time again!

An animation update. This time of Anny! The more progress I make on the first act, the fewer shots I have that feature Anny which makes me sad. So, I’ve been trying to spread them out as I go. So many shots of Jon… so many..

Let’s talk about the elements!

I’ve written a lot about the seven classical planets and celestial/cosmic witchcraft. I think it’s time to bring things a bit more down to earth, though!

This is a new two-part series! It will focus on the natural elements as understood by the Western Magical Tradition.

In today’s article, I’ll be explaining a bit about the history of these concepts and how I see them. I hope you find this interesting and informative!

Thinking About the Elements

Elements are one of the first concepts I learned when beginning a journey into witchcraft. 

But! How do we view the elements as concepts? Lets consider how they relate to us and the whole universe. Here’s my views!

Some believe the elements are simply words for natural phenomena.
In other words, Fire is fire - the burning of a campfire or candle, or another flame. Water would always be something like a stream, the ocean or other liquid. I don’t see it this way. They’re far more complex than that!

The four elements stem the observations of ancient philosophers. These thinkers guessed that these substances were the building blocks of physical reality. Of course, they were wrong! In reality, atoms comprise matter. Matter and energy, then, make up the physical universe. 

We could associate four classical elements with the four states of matter. These are solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. They’d correspond to earth, water, air, and fire in turn. This is a very simplified view, though!

These concepts were fundamental to the ancients. A wealth of lore has developed around them. They have grown into complex metaphors for aspects of the human condition. The physical manifestations of the elements have become potent symbols. 

They represent various mental and emotional phenomena. Symbols are important in witchcraft. The way I see it, all tools of the Craft are symbols used to connect with larger forces that work within the universe.

The elements themselves, and their attributions, are in fact, somewhat arbitrary. This means that each of us will have a different idea of what each element represents!

There’s nothing wrong with this, though. The point is to use them as symbols. What they symbolize to you is your own business!

Qualifying the Elements

In the Western Magical Tradition, there are four core (classical) elements: Earth, Air, Fire, and Water.  

Some traditions do posit a fifth element called the quintessence, also known as Spirit or Aether. This fifth element stands apart from the other four, as it doesn’t behave in the same way.  

I’ll be focusing on these four, not on the quintessence. Spirit as an element is a very large topic best suited for its own series of articles.

Alchemical thinkers have placed these four into categories. . They’re quite useful for understanding the system. 

Each element is either “hot” or “cold,” as well as either “dry,” or “wet.”

This doesn’t describe the physical qualities of the phenomena in question. Rather, these terms are metaphors. They refer to the roles taken by the concepts each element embodies.

Hot and Cold Elements

Hot elements are active in human existence. 

They stand for concepts that penetrate and alter the world around them.
An outdated way of putting this would be to describe them as “masculine.” This comes from historical stereotypes about gender. I tend to use the term “active” to describe hot elements. That’s Fire and Air.

Cold elements are passive and receptive. 

They represent concepts from which we draw nourishment. They are the structure or substance that forms our mental landscape. The hot elements tend to be the essence or organizing principle. 

Cold elements are often stereotyped as “feminine.“  They are Water and Earth, both of which play a nourishing role in human existence.

Wet and Dry Elements

Dryness as a concept within the Western Magical Tradition refers to a fixed state. In other words, the dry elements are things that don’t often change. These elements are full of stability. 

The key feature of a dry element is lack of intense motion. We can depend on the stable parts of our existence, represented by these elements.

The dry elements are Fire and Earth. It may seem strange to call fire stable, but it is a reliable source of warmth to us. It represents a constant feature of human life.

When we speak of wet elements, we mean the two elements that aren’t fixed. In other words, elements that flow ,change and transform. It is the concepts associated with these elements that drive the changes. They are reliable, but only insofar as change, itself, is something to rely on! 

The wet elements are Air and Water. Both are natural features that shift and flow through our lives. The inclusion of Air as a wet element shows that these are metaphorical, not literal terms.

Much more could be said about how people have described the elements throughout time. The above image shows the alchemical view of how the elements can combine to create secondary principles. 

As you might guess, “fixed” and “volatile” here stand for what we’ve been calling “passive” and “active.” If you want to know more about these further topics, I recommend Robert Bartlett’s book, True Alchemy. 

The entire concept of the elements is a metaphor, though. It’s a metaphor that can work for you. It can help with your Craft, and help you connect with the universe. I’ll be posting the next article tomorrow! In that, I’ll be discussing each element in detail.

7

The Muxes of Juchitán 

Juchitán is a town in the southeast of the Mexican state of Oaxaca. The town which is largely inhabited by the Zapotec Indigenous people, has not only preserved it’s precolonial language and culture, but has also retained gender identities and roles that transcend the traditional western ones. Those which were subjected onto much of the rest of Mexican society by European colonizers. 

This contrasting expression of gender that survives among the Zapotec and Mestizo communities of southern Oaxaca, takes its form in the concept of the muxe. Muxe is a term used to refer to those assigned male at birth, but who identify either as women or as a distinct third-gender. They are an intrinsic part of Zapotec society, and highly respected for the roles they play in families, such as taking care of their elderly parents when their siblings have moved out of the household. Despite the acceptance of them in many rural areas, they face discrimination in more urban areas, mainly by non-Indigenous people who have inherited the Spanish cultural attitude of machismo. 

windowpains7213  asked:

I've noticed that you mentioned Wiccans a lot. My MC is a witch, and I wasn't really aware of other kinds of witches, even though I did thorough research. What other kinds of witches are there? Just fyi, she is a mostly-closet witch, and uses stones as connections to places. She mostly uses runecasting and entomomancy (especially beetles and spiders). What might she choose to align with, if anything?

There are, honestly, so many more choices than just Wicca. I’ll try to list several, but do not take this as an exhaustive list. I have added resources where I could, and please forgive the length…

Asatru

An Asatru witch follows a specific branch of Heathenry that worships the major Nordic pantheon.

http://www.ravenkindred.com/index.html

Athiest/Laveyan Satanic (Secular Satanic)

This witch feels more that Satan is a concept or idea, not an actual entity.

http://www.churchofsatan.com/

Celtic

This witch uses the Celtic culture, including its’ mythology, deities, old ways, and language / symbols as a means of learning, internalizing, and performing magic.

http://www.joellessacredgrove.com/Celtic/celtictraditions.html

Christian

A witch that honors and worships the Christian God through the practice of magic, usually alongside more traditional Christian worship.

http://arganteswell.tripod.com/id1.html

Death/Necromancy

This witch utilizes magic through the bodies and spirits of the dead. This can include bones, blood, skin, and other pieces of the corporeal form left when the spirit leaves, as well as contact with the spirit that has left its physical form behind.

http://sarahannelawless.com/2011/11/13/lets-talk-about-necromancy/

Druidism

Is a very old, and very complex set of religious and nature beliefs changing from region to region, and time to time.

http://www.druidry.org/druid-way/druid-beliefs

Eclectic

A witch who respectfully uses parts of multiple practices, traditions, and paths.

http://www.witchpathforward.com/eclectic-witchcraft.html

Gaulish

This witch pays homage to the Gaulish Gods through the study, reconstruction, and practice of Gaulish tradition.

http://www.deomercurio.be/en/index.html

Heathenry

A witch who follows the ways of, works with, and/or worships the Norse deities.

http://www.heathengods.com/faq/index.htm

Hellenic

A path by which the witch follows Greek traditions and honors the Greek pantheon.

http://www.witchpathforward.com/hellenism.html

Hereditary

This witch was born into a family of witches and so is likely to have practices, traditions, and/or paths that are not usually shared outside of their family practice.

Hoodoo

A complex interweaving of Western African traditions as well as a long history of utilizing Christianity. This is a fairly regional practice of the Southern United States, but can be found elsewhere.

https://broadly.vice.com/en_us/article/black-magic-talking-with-hoodoo-witches

Kemetic

This type of witch works with the Egyptian deities.

http://www.witchpathforward.com/kemetism.html

Lokean

A witch who works with and worships Loki and/or any of his relations (Hel, Jormugandr, Sigyn, Angrboda, etc). This witch may pay homage to other Nordic deities as well.

http://witchesandpagans.com/pagan-culture-blogs/lokean-swamp-witch.html

Odinism

A witch who works majorily, or exclusively, with Odin, Thor, Freyjr, Freyja, Frigga, and Heimdall.

http://www.odinistfellowship.co.uk/

Pop Culture

A pop culture witch uses lyrics or movie lines in spells, worships and/or honors pop culture icons and/or idols. Likely to utilize fandom in some way, it is a very new and wide practice. They could draw inspiration from Harry Potter, Vampire Diaries, Practical Magic, The Craft, Supernatural, or other, similar shows.

http://thepaganstudygrouppage.tumblr.com/post/77850531804/brief-intro-to-pop-culture-magic

Regla de Ocha

A religion that was synthesized by West Africans who were taken and enslaved by the Spanish Empire who were then sent to work on the Caribbean Islands. It mixes West African tradition with worship of saints.

http://www.aboutsanteria.com/what-is-santeria.html

Science

This kind of witch synthesizes their craft from a mixture of empirical evidence/data and metaphysical leanings. It is highly individualized.

http://www.wsusignpost.com/2013/10/26/modern-witchcraft-entails-science/

Secular

This type of witch doesn’t connect with any religious practices, traditions, or paths.

https://thewitchcraftjournal.wordpress.com/2014/03/26/witchcraft-as-a-secular-practice/

Solitary

A witch who practices alone, but follows a particular practice, tradition, path.

(Theistic) Satanic

A witch whose practice revolves around worshiping, honoring, or otherwise appealing to Satan.

http://theisticsatanism.com/varieties/FAQ-TS.html

Traditional

A witch who hunts for the “traditional” ways of magic. Likely to be found scouring through histories and stories looking for references to spellcraft, rituals, and traditions that have since been lost to time.

http://sarahannelawless.com/2015/03/17/introduction-to-traditional-witchcraft/

Voudon

An Afro-Caribbean form of worship that focuses on the loa, and spirits.

http://www.livescience.com/40803-voodoo-facts.html

I hope this put some things in perspective as to just how large witchcraft is, and why I seem to harp about being frustrated that the majority of what I see is Wicca. It is prevalent and popular, not the only way to be a witch, and definitely not the only tradition.

To answer your question about your character, Some of these paths lend themselves more towards nature than others, but I’d suggest rather looking into a tradition/path, look at types of witchcraft instead. Your character most sounds like a variety of Green Witch, and/or Animal Witch.

-Bruxa Guerreira

10

The Ancient faces of the Fayum mummy portraits

Egypt


Mummy portraits or Fayum mummy portraits (also Faiyum mummy portraits) is the modern term given to a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Egyptian mummies from the Coptic period. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. In fact, the Fayum portraits are the only large body of art from that tradition to have survived.

 Mummy portraits have been found across Egypt, but are most common in the Faiyum Basin, particularly from Hawara in the Fayum Basin (hence the common name) and the Hadrianic Roman city Antinoopolis. “Faiyum Portraits” is generally thought of as a stylistic, rather than a geographic, description. While painted cartonnage mummy cases date back to pharaonic times, the Faiyum mummy portraits were an innovation dating to the Coptic period at the time of the Roman occupation of Egypt.

 They date to the Roman period, from the late 1st century BC or the early 1st century AD onwards. It is not clear when their production ended, but recent research suggests the middle of the 3rd century. They are among the largest groups among the very few survivors of the highly prestigious panel painting tradition of the classical world, which was continued into Byzantine and Western traditions in the post-classical world, including the local tradition of Coptic iconography in Egypt.

 The portraits covered the faces of bodies that were mummified for burial. Extant examples indicate that they were mounted into the bands of cloth that were used to wrap the bodies. Almost all have now been detached from the mummies. They usually depict a single person, showing the head, or head and upper chest, viewed frontally. In terms of artistic tradition, the images clearly derive more from Graeco-Roman traditions than Egyptian ones.

 Two groups of portraits can be distinguished by technique: one of encaustic (wax) paintings, the other in tempera. The former are usually of higher quality. About 900 mummy portraits are known at present. The majority were found in the necropoleis of Faiyum. Due to the hot dry Egyptian climate, the paintings are frequently very well preserved, often retaining their brilliant colours seemingly unfaded by time.

Personally I`ve seen some at the Museum and was stunned and hypnotized by the ancient 2000 year-old faces looking at me as if they were there with me.

6

Just hadn’t posted much and wanted you guys to know I was actually still drawing.
Four of these I’m planning to finish and a few are gifts. Also threw in some western AU stuff I’ve been avoiding posting because I can’t imagine anyone is interested but me and maybe Nicole.
Also, have you guys seen that dress meme? Because that’s where that Hondo came from.
Also, Sillah makes a guest appearance and she’s @nmallenart oc! The rest are Star Wars characters I’m bastardizing I’m sure but at least I’m having fun, even if it’s just mostly by myself XD

In the 80′s and 90′s, everyone “properly educated” in Witchcraft and Paganism “knew” that a pentagram was the geometric shape of a five-pointed star, and a pentacle was a physical object, like a plate, with magical sigils inscribed into it, or an amulet cast into the shape of said sigils – often a pentagram but there were other seals and sigils used to create different pentacles for different purposes.  In Wicca specifically, the pentagram with a point facing up was the symbol of first-degree, the point down was the symbol of the second degree, and the point up in conjunction with a triangle was the symbol of the third degree.  Non-Wiccans either used point up as a default or had their own associations for the difference.  Western Ceremonial Magic traditions had different ways to draw the (always upright) five-pointed star depending on whether you were invoking/summoning or banishing, and the points you started drawing from and toward gave different elemental correspondences.  For example, the invoking pentagram of spirit started at the point of spirit (top), and drew down to the point of earth (usually lower left as the inscriber is facing it) as the first stroke, calling in powers of spirit into this earthly realm.

In the 90′s an earnest subset of non-initiate and non-British-Traditional Wiccans insisted that all Wiccans and witches only used the point up version, and that Satanists exclusively used the point down version, because they had stolen the pure and good symbol of the Wiccans and inverted it for their use exactly the way they used inverted crosses.  And there was much hand-wringing whenever Hollywood used upright stars in circles for “the bad guys” or inverted stars in circles for “good witches”.

In the 00′s there was a new definition that gained traction for a time that a pentacle was a five-pointed star in a circle, and was therefore “contained” and “safe”, and a pentagram was a five-pointed star without a circle, and was “dangerous” to use or wear because it could… summon things on its own?  use wild magic?  attract spirits? become a portal?  I’m a little fuzzy on this part.  But it was chaotic and “unbound” and therefore only suited to chaos magicians, reckless practitioners, and the most advanced witches, and should be kept out of the hands of children and new witchlings who needed to be protected from uncontrolled magic until they learned to defend themselves properly?  Anyways, it became very important among adherents to this philosophy to check all the penta-whatever pendants on a jewelry display to see if the points of the star were completely contained by, joined with, or extended beyond the circle, because these meant different things about how its magic worked and who it would be “safe” or “appropriate” for.

Oh and now I remember that for a time there were people who ascribed great meaning to whether the lines of a penta-whatever amulet or inscription were flat-joined or interlaced like celtic knotwork, and if they were interlaced, whether the overlapping happened in one particular direction or the other.  But I never quite caught the meanings they associated with those things.  Darn.

A competing meme in the 90′s and 00′s was that the point up was for summoning, and the point down was for banishing.

In the 10′s, the dominant story in the next generation of witchlings seems to be that the pentacle is any five-pointed star, in image or object (there is no differentiation between the shape and the physical object, that meaning has pretty much disappeared), with the point facing up, and is symbolic of “white witchcraft” (a racist distinction for another rant) or “good magic”, and the point down is a pentagram, which is used by Satanists, necromancers, demonologists, and “black magic”.

This new definition has become viral and I think we in the older generation are outnumbered now.  I think we’ve lost this meme war.  

But hey kids, if you’re reading books published before the turn of this century, please be aware that the author is probably using the older definitions of the terms and not these newer things.

Now what interests me is how it’s going to change in the next memetic shift.  Anybody want to place bets?

I have a small bet that the new wave of “true meaning” will be that a pentacle has to be cast in silver, and a pentagram is anything made in a different metal, such as bronze, copper, iron, steel, pewter, gold, brass, etc.

Most of my money is riding on that it’ll be something completely out of left field I’ll have never heard of or thought of, but that will be suddenly widespread and an “everybody knows that the real meaning…” phenomenon. Just like all the rest of these waves.  ;)

9

In early July a close friend of mine asked me to make him a dress for a friend’s upcoming wedding. As a huge contra dance fan and a resident near Asheville, NC, it was imperative to him that the skirt be extremely full, ready for a long contra set and many spins. The voluminous pleated skirt, mixed with his desire for a traditional style western shirt made this design an irresistible challenge.

He bought the fabrics and fasteners he wanted, sent them to me, and I got to work. Luckily Julian happens to be almost the exact same size and isn’t opposed to wearing the occasional dress, so he stood in as my fit model. A few days and many pleats later and the dress was finished, complete with paisley details, brass snaps, some deep pockets, and a bronze belt buckle that Chrome kindly sent my way.

After a quick photo shoot it was shoved into an envelope and sent off to North Carolina, where I have word that it spun the night away at that wedding. 

Reasons Herbs May Not Work

It breaks my heart when I see people give up on herbs too easily.

More and more people are turning to herbs because there is a growing disappointment with using pharmaceuticals for chronic illness.

Many people are getting fed up with taking a pill that never really cures their illness and gives them awful side effects. Maybe they are concerned about acetaminophen giving their young child asthma (1) or they see the growing evidence about the risks associated with statins (2) and they say enough is enough!

From this moment forward they vow to never resort to drugs again and instead try a more natural and holistic approach thus leading them to the world of herbs and herbalism.

But sometimes their love affair with herbalism is stopped short.

They reach for the closest herb book, try a few remedies and then declare that the herbs don’t work! They tried using horehound for coughing with no relief. They tried meadowsweet for their headache to no avail.

They begin to wonder, “Are herbalists a bunch of delusional wood fairies touting the miracles of something that never works?”

As much as I would love to be considered a wood fairy, I’ll have to say no, this is not the case. I’ve seen herbs work hundreds of times. I’ve seen them work for serious infections as well as serious chronic diseases. I’ve seen them work when modern medicine failed.

Yes, herbs work!

I want to share a handful of reasons why herbs might not work in a given situation.

1. Improper dosing (either too little or too much)

When buying over the counter drugs like NyQuil or Tylenol, they come in a package that is clearly marked with the dosage instructions. Generally these are very simple instructions. “Adults take 2 tablets, three times daily.”

Herbs don’t always come with directions. If you buy bulk herbs the dosing instructions are absent entirely. If you buy a tincture or a bottle of capsules the dosage listed on the bottle has most likely been chosen by the FDA’s labeling mandates and not by an herbalist.  

I am not going to lie to you. Dosage in the herbal world is confusing.

In herbalism dosage varies from person to person, from plant to plant and from preparation to preparation.

A 15 minute infusion of a teaspoon of nettle leaf will not extract the same vitamins and minerals as a four-hour infusion of an ounce of nettle leaf in a quart of water.

A few drops of lobelia tincture can promote relaxation. A strong cup of lobelia tea could make you vomit.

One way I commonly see dosages being flubbed in herbalism is people using small amounts of tonic/adaptogen herbs in tincture, versus the traditional use of large amount of tonic/adaptogen herbs as decoctions or powders. (As always go with what works, but if you aren’t getting the results you’d expect after taking 5 drops of ashwanganda tincture twice a day, consider your dose!)

Frequency of dosing can also be an issue. During acute illnesses we generally use slightly smaller amounts but with more frequency. I may take elderberry elixir 1-2 times each hour at the onset of an illness for example. General recommendations are to take herbs 3 times a day, but that won’t cut it for acute illness.

2. Low quality plant material

Herbs often don’t come with an expiration date. Quality can also vary significantly and will suffer greatly if the herbs have been improperly harvested or improperly processed.

Plants decay. They simply go bad. The rate at which they do this varies significantly from plant to plant. If you’ve just pulled a bag of herbs from your back shelf and had to blow off an inch of dust… well, they are probably not at their prime.

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The fact that Sana hasn’t been able to pray yet without being interrupted is such a real representation of how Islam, and other non-western and ‘non-traditional’ religions, are still viewed in society today. The fact that she hasn’t been able to pray in peace is such a subtle way of showing us how a lot of the time, western society doesn’t want people like Sana to participate in her own religion, to embrace her own culture. The fact that I’ve seen so many people who watch this show say things like ‘let Sana pray in peace’ fills me with so much hope that this type of thinking will make its way into real life situations that people are confronted with. This season has done and shown us so much already, it has opened so many doors and minds and I’m so ready for Sana to change the world.

Appropriating Latinx Magical Realism: A Twitter Thread

Mel from Books on Wings began this discussion by tweeting: “Apart from all the mess that is MS’ new book, I’ve always been hesitant about non-latinx people writing magical realism. It’s prominently a Latin American genre and she took inspiration from Isabel Allende and García Márquez. But why would we need her voice and story?”

I studied magical realism and the fantastic in college, and wrote my senior thesis on it, so I decided to jump in, because this has often bothered me as well. So here it is: You can write magical realism without appropriating Latin-American stories or Latinx magical realism. It’s easy. Here’s why. 

Magical Realism as a genre was founded by Gabriel García Márquez. One Hundred Years of Solitude and The House of the Spirits are two examples of the genre. This genre is largely a reaction against colonialism and Western realism. The idea is that mythology and spirituality are not as separate from the ‘real world’ in non-Western storytelling traditions. Here’s a way of explaining this: when I was a kid, my parents and grandparents told me a lot of stories about our history that are exaggerated, added-to, mythologized a little bit, etc. If I told a family history, I would tell those stories instead of finding the real ones, because these stories actually explain my family better. It’s an argument that it’s actually sort of more real if you include those tales rather than the ‘historically correct ones.’ You can pull inspiration from this genre successfully without appropriating it. For example, Jeffrey Eugenides in Middlesex uses the same sort of family/historical epic framework, dotted with magical realism, to tell his story. 

Magical realism is used in the literature of many cultures, from Balkan to Japanese to African-American novels and stories. It’s often used to project an anti-Western outlook, but with postmodernism, many Western writers began to utilize it as well. But outside of Latin America, magical realism is a mode, not a genre. It is a literary tool to enhance your story and give it depth, or mystery. It’s used, just for example, by The Master and Margarita, Ulysses, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Lincoln in the Bardo, the short stories of Shirley Jackson and Angela Carter. Would you put those all into the same genre? No, me neither. That’s because these all use magical realism but don’t try to appropriate the genre of magical realism, which is a Latin American genre. They use it as a mode to create a certain feeling, experience, and depth for the reader, but are not directly using the styles of Marquez.

That’s my problem with Maggie Stiefvater’s new novel. There is no reason why you need to appropriate Latinx stories or tropes from the genre of magical realism in order to write a novel that has magical realism in it. As Mel added, non-Latinx people can use it as a mode—but there’s no reason to take Latinx stories away. I agree. Do you want to write a novel with magical realism in it? Great—so do I, in fact. But why do you need to write a Latin American story to do so? The answer is that you really don’t. 

Days of the Week + The Theoi

So I don’t know about y'all, but I have historically had a hard time maintaining feast days and devotional holidays via monthly calendars. A lot of the time, I feel as if I’m doing a disservice to a particular god if I miss their celebrations, or if I don’t have the energy or motivation to manage a full ritual for a particular sacred day. More often than not, I will plan to do something for a deity on a particular date, and then– when that day arrives… work, unexpected plans, depression, or even just a lack of motivation interrupts and I feel as if I have let the Theoi, and myself, down.

But no longer! I have a much better track record of keeping to my habits if I simply set everything onto a weekly cycle. I have done this with devotional days, and the effect has been reinvigorating. So I’m here to pass on this knowledge to you, my fellow Hellenists.

A weekly schedule is helpful to me, because it breaks worship down into bitesized chunks, chunks that are flexible and cyclical, so that I can A) plan ahead easily (it’s much simpler to have the same agenda every week rather than having to look ahead on a lunar calendar to plan in conjunction with the rest of my hectic life), and B) stop beating myself up if I miss a day because, guess what? the next chance to participate in these devotions are only a week away!

I loosely base my schedule on the traditional Western associations for the days of the week (as determined by their planetary rulers), and they are flexible enough that anyone could adapt this setup to their specifications.

Hestia is honored daily

Sunday - (gods of light, prophecy, daytime, the arts) Apollon, Helios, Eos, Hemera, Aether, Leto, the Mousai

Monday - (gods of night, the moon) Artemis, Selene, Nix, Erebus, Hypnos, Morpheus, the Hespiredes

Tuesday - (gods of war and victory) Ares, Pallas, Eris, Enyo, Phobos, Deimos, Nike

Wednesday - (gods of work, knowledge, and skill) Hermes, Athene, Asklepios, Hephaestos, Tyche, Prometheus, Ouranos

Thursday - (gods of law, justice, and social order) Zeus, Hera, Hebe, Herakles, Rhea, Eileithya, Dike,

Friday - (gods of love, beauty, and pleasure) Aphrodite, Dionysos, Pan, the Kharites, Eros, Iris, Psyche

Saturday - (gods of the earth and the underworld) Haides, Persephone, Demeter, Kronos, Hekate, Thanatos, Poseidon

Note: these are arbitrary assignments that I used for my own setup. You could completely categorize your week based on entirely different parameters assigning different spheres of influences than I’ve used (for example, Poseidon was particularly difficult to place and I eventually settled on his epithet “Earth Shaker” in order to fit him into a group in my overly-chaotic mind; you might use a day just for ocean deities). You could use fill the week out using only Olympians, or only divine couples, or based on the classical elements, or alphabetically. This is not a strict calendar, don’t take it as such, I am only using my own as an example for the broader idea of creating a weekly calendar in the first place.

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Today I want to look at traditional depictions of witches in both the west and in Japan, how the magical girl genre developed out of the blending of the two, Sailor Moon being a witch, not in a crappy Madoka Magica “corruption of innocence way”, just like, she’s a witch and, by extension, how this makes Vegeta a wizard?

Closed Captioning coming soon.

Transcript below:

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The Trio, Tokyo, Japan (c.1898-1901). Lilla Cabot Perry (American, 1848-1933). Oil on canvas. Fogg Museum of Art.

In 1897 Perry’s husband received a teaching position in Japan, as an English professor at the Keiogijku University. Lilla Perry met Okakura Kakuzō, one of the Imperial Art School co-founders. Perry’s involvement with the Asian art world greatly influenced her work and made it possible for her to develop a unique style that brought together western and eastern aesthetic traditions.

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《古裝時代》 Evolution of the Chinese Period Theme Song  by Singaporean group The Teng Ensemble which uses both Western and traditional Chinese instruments.

A medley of Chinese theme songs from Chinese dramas and film from the past to the present. See how many you can recognize! I recognize way too many, it means I’m old :cries: Who is as old as me? :(

歌曲列表  Full List of songs:
1. 書劍恩仇錄The Legend of the Book and the Sword (1976)《書劍恩仇錄》
2. 天龍八部Demi-Gods and Semi Devils (1982)《兩忘煙水裡》
3. 射雕英雄傳The Legend of the Condor Heros (1983)《世間始終你好》
4. 西遊記Journey to the West (1986)《敢問路在何方》
5. 笑傲江湖The Swordsman (1990)《滄海一聲笑》
6. 黃飛鴻Once upon a time in China (1991)《男兒當志強》
7. 新白娘子傳奇The Legend of White Snake (1992)《千年等一回》
8. 六指琴魔Dreadful Melody (1994)《天龍八音》
9. 梁祝The Lovers (1994)《梁山伯與祝英台
10. 神鵰俠侶The Condor Heroes (1995)《神話.情話》
11. 還珠格格 Princess Pearl (1998)《當》
12. 水滸傳 Water Margin (1998)《好漢歌》
13. 臥虎藏龍Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon (2000)《月光愛人》
14. 英雄 Hero (2002)《For the World theme》
15. 十面埋伏House of Flying Daggers (2004)《佳人曲》
16. 功夫 Kungfu Hustle (2004)《東海漁歌》
17. 神話 The Myth (2005)《美麗的神話》
18. 滿城盡帶黃金甲Curse of the Golden Flower (2006)《菊花台》
19. 霍元甲 Fearless (2006)《霍元甲》
20. 葉問 Ip Man (2008)《Maestro》
21. 步步驚心Scarlet Heart (2011)《三寸天堂》
22. 后宮甄嬛傳Empresses in the Palace (2011)《紅顏劫》
23. 一代宗師The Grandmaster (2013)《一代宗師》
24. 武媚娘傳奇The Empress of China (2014)《無字碑》
25. 刺客聶隱娘 The Assassin (2015)