western towns

6

Soooo I don’t think I’ve mentioned yet on tumblr that I just left HBO to go be the new Art Director at @camposantoblog! More on that later (it goes without saying that I am very excited about it), but in the interim between the two gigs I’ve been off on a spontaneous road trip exploring/sketching a bunch of ghost towns and other cool stuff in California/Nevada.

I ended up hitting a total of nine ghost town/mine/ranch sites, and so this is Part 1 of my sketch drop – Bodie and Chemung Mine.

We played last night and it was so much fuuuun!!

We left the town of Wellington and arrived at Crossroads, a western/cowboy town!  Rhos and Zira are embracing it big time.

- @adriana-likes-tea

2

My New Henry Big Boy in .357 mag/.38 Special

About a month and a half ago I used my tax refund to buy this beautiful new lever action rifle. The Henry Big Boy is a lever action produced by Henry Repeating Arms Co., one of their many lever action products. Mine is chambered in .357 magnum, many of their rifles are chambered in pistol caliber cartridges, hearkening back to the days of the Old West when Winchester lever actions were chambered in cowboy pistol cartridges such as .44-40 and .45 Colt. The Henry Big Boy comes in .357, .44 mag, and .45 colt. Since mine is .357, it can also feed and chamber .38 special as well.  I bought this possibly as a short range hunting rifle, something to use when I don’t feel like using my flintlock.  Plus, since it can fire .38 special, it is a very economical plinking gun.  .357 is a fairly powerful pistol cartridge, but from a rifle it sports some very impressive ballistics, and it’s certainly good enough to take medium sized game at short ranges.

The most notable feature of the Big Boy is its brass frame. They also offer the same model with an iron frame, a checkered stock, and rubber butt pad. I considered buying that one because it would probably be more practical as a rifle to lug through thick woods. However the lovely gleam of it’s brass frame, brass butt plate, and brass barrel bands was too much to resist.  It will probably get scratched, oh well, it was worth it. The rifle features a neat hexagon barrel, adding to its nostalgic old timey look and giving you the feeling that you are handling an old fashioned cowboy gun. It features a ten round fixed magazine, which is loaded through a loading port at the end of the barrel.  To load the magazine port must be twisted and magazine rod removed. Then you insert the cartridges one at a time, then re-insert the magazine rod.

When I first bought this rifle the magazine rod was very hard to twist and operate.  However the more and more I work it, the more its wearing in and its becoming progressively easier.

Often the Henry Golden Boy and Big Boy is mistaken as a replica of the American Civil War era Henry M1860 lever action rifle. However this is not true. Rather, the Big Boy is almost like a hybrid of a Henry rifle, a Winchester Model 1866, and a Marlin Model 336.  It has the loading port system and tube magazine of the Henry, the forearm and brass frame of a Winchester M1866, and a Marlin action.  Regardless you still get this feeling of handling and firing an antique cowboy lever gun, a must for my tastes. The sights are simple, featuring and adjustable ramp rear sight and a front post sight.

Another feature I must mention is a transfer bar, which means you can have the hammer uncocked and down on a round without risk of accidental discharge, which is probably the most important modern feature on a rifle with design elements dating to the 19th century.

With .357 the action is very smooth and operates without any problem.  I did some plinking with both .357 and .38 special.  I purchased some cheap bottom shelf ammo not thinking about the possibility of feeding issues. Problem is I bought this really cheap .38 special ammo that used lacquered steel casings, and ejection was certainly is issue. I later bought some better quality .38 special with brass casings and found they fed with far less issues, though the action isn’t as smooth as with .357 and you kind of have to work the lever harder and faster to ensure proper feeding and ejection. The recoil is very light, even firing .357 magnum. Recoil wise I would compare it to 7.62x39.  So it will definitely save your shoulder despite the brass buttplate.

At first I just did some simple close range plinking at steel swivel targets at 25 yards.  The rifle hits right on at that range and it certainly is a fun plinker.  Then I took it to the 100 yard range to see what I can do. I must admit I had a bit of a handicap shooting, I work night shift and it was a particularly bright day. So my eyes were very sensitive to light and my vision a bit blurry. I think I’m turning into a vampire. 

I was shooting from a bench rest with open sights, using Fiocchi .357 magnum ammo with 142 grain bullets.  I was firing three rounds groups.  First I tested it at 50 yards. At 50 yards the target and visible and well defined. Note that each increment on the grid is one inch.

The first group shot to the right and high aiming at the bull. I decided to play with the adjustable ramp sight, lowering it one increment.  The result was the 2nd group, which shot low.  Thus I reset the sight and adjusted but aiming low, and to the left, resulting in the third group. At 50 yards it shoots on average 1-2 inch groupings.

I then continued by shooting at 100 yards.  At 100 yards the front sight completely covers the bullseye and black portion of the target.

Despite increasing range to 100 yards it still shot high, in fact it shot much higher than at 50 yards. The first grouping I was aiming right for the bull, resulting again in a high group, with one shot completely off the target. I can only assume know that the .357 magnum’s ballistic arc from this rifle is much more considerable than I had previously imagined.  Thus I adjust the the ramp sight down one increment. Like at 50 yards it then shot too low (2nd group). So I reset the sight and decided to aim low, resulting in the third group. At 100 yards it shoots around 2-3 inch groupings on average.

In my final test, I went back to 50 yards. This time I was not using the bench rest, instead firing off hand.  Nor was I taking time with my shots.  Basically the scenario was that I am the sheriff of a western town and some outlaws are up to no good and I have to deal with them.  So I was shooting as quickly as possible while keeping rounds on target.  This was the result.

Now I must say this is no tack driver, nor is it a long range rifle, and I bought it with that expectation. Ballistics data using a 140 grain bullet show that it has a drop of -.2 inches at 100 yards and -5 inches at 150 yards.  So 100 yards is probably the edge of its optimum range. Mine seems to shoot high, but I still would not go beyond 100 yards.  That is fine to me since where I traditionally hunt it is thick woods and there is rarely any continuous ground more than 75 yards. With a scope you could probably get much better range and accuracy out of it. I imagine that if I was using much better quality ammunition with hotter loads, say +P or buffalo bore ammunition, the groupings would tighten considerably at 100 yards and the adjustable sites will be much more useful.  I shall try that some time in the future and post the results.

My final comments on the Henry Big Boy had to do with its quality. Originally I wanted to buy a Rossi Circuit Judge in .410/.45 long colt, most because of the allure of a revolving rifle.  However, I had seen many complaints about the quality of it and manufacturing flaws. Plus it carried the Taurus name (Rossi is owned by Taurus), a Brazilian company which has a reputation for iffy quality control.  So I decided to ditch the Circuit Judge. I also looked at the Ross M1892 lever action rifle, also in .357/38 and also made by Taurus.  It was $300 cheaper (the Henry cost $730), but when I saw it in person I was not impressed.  The metal work was OK, as was the metal finish, done satisfactorily but nothing thrilling.  However the wood and wood finish looked bad, as if it had been done by either child labor, a drunk, or someone who just didn’t really care about what they were doing.  It was really off putting.  The Henry looks like a rifle of unparalleled quality at first glance. It looks like someone made them with an eye for detail and with uncompromising quality in mind. I also own a Henry lever action in .22LR as well, although with a steel frame, and I can say the same for it.  When the sales person took it out of the box I immediately blurted “holy shit, that’s a beautiful rifIe.” I can’t stress the quality of workmanship that goes into Henry rifles, they are more than just firearms, they are works of art.  They are the only metallic cartridge firearms I own and I have no plans nor feel the need to buy any other modern firearms again. Instead I want to focus my collection on antique muzzleloaders or replicas of antique muzzleloaders.  So for me the quality of the Henry trumps all else, its a rifle you can own for a lifetime and can be passed down from generation to generation.

Like I’m Dyin’

Rockstar Dean/Demon!Dean Winchester x Reader 

Small town singer Dean Winchester suddenly becomes a Vegas rockstar. Will his girlfriend be able to get back the simple man he once was?

Warnings: ANGST, double dose of SMUT, breath play, fluff, feels, alcohol, demeaning language, a moment of non-con which is resolved, angsty ending. 

A/N: This is for @bulletscrossbowpie’s AU Challenge/Rockstar. Also @mrs-squirrel-chester’s Album Challenge: D.D. by The Weeknd. I figured this was my chance to combine my fav version of Dean with my fav version of Jensen. So I give you, Rockstar Demon!Dean in leather. WC: 6238 On AO3

Gifs aren’t mine, but the concert pic in the aesthetic is from @stardustandmelancholy and the gifs/videos are from Tumblr and YouTube.


Hyattsville was a small town in western Kansas, known for it’s ‘biggest hay bale in America’ tourist trap and a former high school beauty queen turned national news anchor. I met the Winchester brothers one evening when I was getting coffee at a shop in town. They were singing at open mic night- the younger brother playing guitar as the older brother sang. He had an amazing, sultry voice that sent shivers down my arms. And the fact that he was absolutely gorgeous didn’t hurt either.

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via Henry Diltz’s facebook page;

“Here is a favorite picture of my dear pal Micky Dolenz. It looks like it’s from a past lifetime, but it’s really from a Monkees episode called "Hillbilly Honeymoon” in 1967. It was always fun when they filmed outdoors in the old Western movie town on the Columbia Ranch in Burbank.“

Setting: old western town.

I kick in the door to the saloon. I saunter in as all eyes fall on me. I stand there before them all, they wait on the edge of their seats to hear what I got to say. “Any man or woman that thinks they can hug better than me, better just put that notion to bed. I’m the best hugger in these lands.” I announce to them. I see a few patrons that start to rise to face my declaration, but sit down, thinking better of it.

Star Wars Dark Disciple: ‘this novel will skew towards adult readers’.

[Two hundred pages of Asajj’s struggles with her haberdashery bill on a freelance Bounty Hunter budget]