western prints

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The Storia Western Trilogy… written and directed by Sergio Leonne (Not Sergio Leone, that’s another guy. He made the Dollars Trilogy)

Prints Available here: https://society6.com/astoralexander/collection/storia-western-trilogy

Wild West Wolf

This piece is a recreation of a photograph with the client’s character as the stand in, some details changed in an attempt to make it more accurate to the late 1800’s.  The $20 bills on the table should be period accurate, and to my knowledge so are the cards and poker chips.  Not that I was going for straight up historical accuracy, there’s plenty of leeway to for matching the original photo, and for making it a fun to look at piece.  Feels great to get my teeth into a more detailed piece after doing so many small commissions, and this one was truly a pleasure to make!

Prints available here - https://www.etsy.com/listing/517631242/wild-west-wolf-print

11 hours in PS6 with an Intuos pro tablet

Fan Bing Bing absolutely killing it and looking like an immaculate goddess at the Met Gala, meanwhile nearly everyone else entirely missed the theme memo.

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Usual Noel vs. Noel who forgot to fill his eyebrows in.

5

Happy Birthday Leonardo da Vinci!

The leading artist and intellectual of the Italian Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci, was born on this day in 1452.

These are just a few of the drawings by da Vinci held in our Western Art Print Room, available to view by anyone by appointment. The Print Room is home to more than 270,000 prints & drawings. 

Images:

  • Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). A Maiden with a Unicorn. Pen and dark brown ink on white paper.
  • Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). A Unicorn. Pen and dark brown ink with metalpoint on white paper.
  •  Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). A Horseman in Combat with a Griffin. Silverpoint on a cream preparation, touched with the brush in bodycolour.
  • Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). Detail from a sheet of studies of Figures and of Machinery. Silverpoint on pale pink prepared paper.
  • Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). The Virgin and Child Adored. Lead point over indentations with the stylus on off-white paper.
flickr

Watanabe Nobukazu - A Picture of a High-Ranking Marriage Ceremony - 1900 - Tacoma Art Museum by Marshall Astor

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>
<br />From the permanent collection of the Tacoma Art Museum in Tacoma, WA.
What was the relationship between Sephardim and Ashkenazim on the West Coast?

By Leora Singer, Former Research Intern

This is my second blog post in a series of three posts in which I discuss the theme of Sephardim in the West Coast in the 19th-20th century. You can see my first post here. In this post, I compare and contrast the relationship between Ashkenazim and Sephardim in Seattle and San Francisco.

Seattle:

When Calvo and Policar (the first two Sephardim in Seattle) first encountered the Orthodox Ashkenazi Jews living in the city, they weren’t exactly welcomed with open arms. These observant Jews didn’t believe that Policar and Calvo were “real Jews” because they spoke Greek instead of Yiddish (Adatto, 56), and their names didn’t “sound Jewish” (Angel, 553). Because they felt ostracized by the Jewish community, Calvo and Policar spent a lot of time with Greek non-Jews living in Seattle (Adatto, 58). Fortunately, the rabbi of Bikur Holim, an Orthodox synagogue, convinced the Orthodox Ashkenazim that the Sephardim were just as observant as they were. The Ashkenazim accepted Calvo and Policar as members of the Jewish people.

The Seattle Sephardic community kept growing as Calvo and Policar brought family members over, and these family members spread the word about the opportunities available in Seattle (Adatto, 60). In 1904, the first Rhodesli Sephardic immigrant came to Seattle (FitzMorris, 29). As the number of Sephardim in Seattle grew, their ties to the overall Jewish community of Seattle grew. Many Sephardim prayed at Bikur Holim. They felt somewhat connected to the Orthodox Ashkenazim because they, like the Sephardim, upheld high religious standards (Adatto, 116). However, the perception was that their cultures were just too different to mix together, so the Sephardim and Orthodox Ashkenazim remained fairly separate. For example, intermarriage between the two groups was highly rare (Adatto, 117).

Despite its rocky nature, the beginning of the relationship between Orthodox Sephardim and Orthodox Ashkenazim was still stronger than the beginning of the relationship between Sephardim and Reform Ashkenazim. The Sephardim distrusted the Reform Ashkenazim because they believed that the Reform Ashkenazim were not following enough of the Jewish traditions. Fortunately, Aubrey Levy from the Reform Temple de Hirsch helped to change this negative view of Reform Judaism by forming a friendship with the Sephardic Jews. As a lawyer, he helped Sephardim with legal work, free of charge. For example, in 1914, he assisted them with the legal logistics in the purchase of the (previously Ashkenazi-owned) Bikur Holim synagogue (Adatto, 118-119). Levy was highly regarded by the Sephardim. By association, his synagogue became highly regarded as well. In fact, many Sephardic children got their Jewish education at the Hebrew School of Temple de Hirsch. However, even after many years, there was still very little intermarriage. The Sephardim still did not feel like a part of Ashkenazi culture.

San Francisco:

There was a temporary Sephardic congregation in the early 1850s (Zerin, 30). The congregation was called Shaar Hashamayim. It was so temporary that it never even had a building because the congregation stopped meeting only a few months after its creation (Zerin, 47). This is likely because the construction of new buildings for two Ashkenazi-run synagogues, Temple Emanu-El and Temple Sherith- Israel, was underway. Since the Sephardim and Ashkenazim in San Francisco were united, (especially in comparison to these sects in other West Coast cities) the Sephardim didn’t want to divide it by having their own synagogue. Also, some members of the Sephardic congregation had been leaders in the other synagogues, because they were so prominent and respected by the Ashkenazim (Stern and Kramer, 47).

Sephardim from San Francisco are sometimes difficult to identify because intermarriage with Ashkenazim and even non-Jews was common (Stern and Kramer, 45). This practice showed a stark difference between the Jews of San Francisco and in other West Coast cities. In the other cities, intermarriage between pretty much anyone that was not a Jew from your home country was frowned upon.

Bibliography:

Adatto, Albert. Sephardim and the Seattle Sephardic Community. Seattle: U of Washington, 1939. Print.

Angel, Marc D., Hasson, Aron, Kramer, William M., Maimon, Isaac, Samuels, Beth, Sidell, Loraine, Stern, Norton B. Sephardic Jews in the West Coast States : An Anthology. 1st ed. Los Angeles: Published for the Skirball Cultural Center, Los Angeles by the Western States Jewish History Association, 1996. Print. Western States Jewish History ; v. 28, No. 1-3.

Stern, Stephen. The Sephardic Jewish Community of Los Angeles. New York: Arno, 1980. Print. Folklore of the World (New York).

Zerin, Edward. Jewish San Francisco. Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2006. Print. Images of America