6

Steve Bannon’s obsession with this racist novel is just the tip of the iceberg

  • Yes, Steve Bannon has repeatedly compared refugees from war-torn nations to the demonized depiction of immigrants in an obscure novel who eat their own poop and try to murder all white people.
  • Bannon has repeatedly cited a racist French novel in defense of Trump’s ban on entry from certain Muslim majority countries, the Huffington Post reported.
  • On at least four occasions, Bannon referenced Jean Raspail’s 1973 novel The Camp of the Saints to defend Trump’s immigration policies.
  • In interviews and speeches, Bannon referred to “Camp of the Saints-type invasion into Central and then Western and Northern Europe” as well as a broader “global Camp of the Saints” scenario.
  • When it comes to Bannon’s reading list, The Camp of the Saints is only the tip of the iceberg. Read more (3/6/17 8:18 PM)
Classic Western European Fairytale Perfumes

Cinderella / Aschenputtel

Moon Dance, Juliette Has A Gun: as the name suggests, the perfect romantic perfume to wear dancing in a pavilion late at night. It’s a rare luminous perfume: silvery, shimmery, sliding into the floral citrus notes of bergamot, eventually warming up to the rose, and softly fading away with musk.
bergamot / violet / rose / tuberose / patchouli / musk

Hansel & Gretel / The Erl King

Fille En Aiguilles, Serge Lutens: when I first smelled it, I was immediately transported to the pine and balsam forests of my childhood. It simmers with warm resinous notes - just the sort of forest the children would have been lost in. 
pine needles / vetiver / laurel bay leaf / resin / frankincense

Beauty and the Beast / La Belle et La Bête

Eau Parfumée Au Thé Bleu, Bvlgari: I imagine Beauty in soft wool, reading books, smelling of frosty Provençal lavender, fresh hay, and warm violet. The perfume’s drydown is a pale, luminous iris. It’s understated and gentle, warm and bittersweet.
lavender / shiso leaves / blue tea / violet / iris / musk

The Twelve Dancing Princesses

Heure Exquise, Annick Goutal: a classic floral perfume, its vintage glamour is precisely what makes it so suited to the idea of twelve princesses dancing beneath leaves of gold and silver. Its vivacious rose-galbanum heart is softened by the powdery almond and gentle coumarin. It envelops you in luxurious textures: cashmere, alpaca…
iris / hyacinth / rose / galbanum / almond / coumarin / sandalwood

tbh i think the fact that people here [in the US] see russia as one great putin-loving monolith but see countries like the uk as complex and multifaceted societies and not some homogeneous brexit & theresa may fandom (thats a specific example but it applies to all of western europe and north america pretty much) really just boils down to antiquated cold war era xenophobia + borderline colonialist paternalism and its annoying as hell and it makes me sick

Imperfect pages

Bodleian reader Sarah Gilbert happened upon some interesting, imperfect pages when examining a manuscript at the Bodleian Libraries. We asked her to write about the experience.

In the medieval period in Western Europe, books were copied by hand onto specially prepared animal skins. The animals used for this purpose in the British Isles were sheep and cows, and in order to turn their pelts into pages these animals would be killed, their blood would be drained, they would be skinned, and then these skins would be soaked and stretched, scraped and dried, and polished and trimmed to make them into usable pages.

Jesus College MS 37, a copy of Iohannus Diaconus’ Vita Sancti Gregorii, is a manuscript with some very unusual pages. A few of its folios preserve faint traces of their animal past in the form of stained blood vessels.

Such stained vessels are very rare - transparent vein structures can sometimes be seen on a manuscript page like contour lines on a map, but to see the vessels still outlined in blood is much more unusual, and is possibly the result of the animals being bled too slowly after they had been killed.

Making parchment was a skilled job and sometimes imperfect pages were used in medieval books simply because the skins, however flawed, were too precious to waste.

As I was reading Jesus College 37 I was very excited to see such an unusual manuscript phenomenon “in the flesh.”

- Sarah Gilbert, Bodleian reader.

Something so few people seem to understand regarding the situation in Europe, is how they seem to think the inherent landscape of the place will not be irrecoverably changed by the current, uncontested ‘refugee’ migration. So often I hear ‘Oh well, we’ll disappear but our culture will survive’. Will it? Do you really think a culture heavily dominated by Islam wouldn’t gut the contents of the Louvre for being un-Islamic? Do you think Notre Dame wouldn’t be converted into a mosque? That its windows and sculptures, like that in every old church in Europe, wouldn’t be smashed as idolatry? That the pagan Parthenon wouldn’t be finished off, or that Stonehenge wouldn’t be pulled down? Can this be called impossible, when its already happened in areas controlled by ISIS, whom many of these ‘refugees’ support, or in places like Saudi Arabia where pre-Islamic sites are regularly destroyed? Our culture will not live on, cradled by a new, ‘adopted’ population. It will be wiped away, and replaced by the culture of a new people, and with it will go thousands of years of memory.

4

The Swingin’ Harlem Hellfighters Band,

The Harlem Hellfighters have taken to the spotlight in modern times thanks to the popularity of the video game “Battlefield 1″, where the African American soldiers are featured in the very opening of the game. The US 369th Infantry Regiment was a unit of African American soldiers who served with incredible distinction during World War I. During the war many white American soldiers refused to serve with blacks, and as a result the 369th was assigned to the French Army, the French having little qualms with serving with African Americans, nor did they have a policy of segregation such as the US Army. They were even issued French weapons and wore French helmets while in combat. During their service in World War I the 369th was nicknamed by the French “The Harlem Hellfighters” because of their tenacious fighting spirit.  They never gave ground in combat, not one soldier was ever captured, and they served the longest continuous deployment of any other Allied unit during the war (191 days of continuous combat). Due to their bravery, they were also among the most decorated Allied units, with two Medals of Honor, 171 French Croix de Guerre’s, and numerous Distinguished Service Crosses.

One of the most unique features of the Harlem Hellfighter’s was their band, perhaps the only unit in the entire war to have a ragtime band.  Unlike pretty much all other military bands which played traditional marches and martial music, the Harlem Hellfighter Band played the music they loved and could perform best, mostly American ragtime music and early forms of Jazz.  The Harlem Hellfighter Band was directed by Lt. James Reese Europe, a man who was certainly fit for the job as he was the band leader of the Clef Club Orchestra, a band popular in New York for their ragtime and proto-jazz music.

On April 8th, 1918 French soldiers turned their heads in wonder as The Harlem Hellfighters marched toward the front to the tunes of hot ragtime and Jazz beats. 

No one in Europe had ever heard such music, in fact Jazz was barely even heard in the United States outside of a few communities in New Orleans, Chicago, and New York.  The new music became an instant hit among both French and British soldiers, and before long the Harlem Hellfighters Band was being called to perform for French and British units all along the line, as well as villages they passed through. Soon, the Harlem Hellfighters swinging sound took Western Europe by storm, and the band was even invited to perform in Paris at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées. Among the Hellfighters biggest hits was a ragtime tune called “Memphis Blues”.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJPztEjzf6s

Another popular hit was “On Patrol in No Man’s Land”, written by Lt. James Europe himself while recuperating after being wounded in a poison gas attack while on patrol.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpFCuZ-B4j0

And then of course the biggest crowd pleaser given the location and audience was a jazzed up version of “Le Marseillaise”  

After the war the band would make a grand tour of Europe, then return home and make a grand tour of the United States. Stories of the Harlem Hellfighters unique sound had spread across American and people were demanding more.  During their American tour, the band cut 24 records. Everywhere they went, whether in Europe or the United States, they drew huge cheering crowds, they had become the superstars of their day. 

Unfortunately the story of the Harlem Hellfighters Band did not end well for James Europe. On the night of May 9th, 1919 Europe confronted one of his drummers over poor and unprofessional behavior.  The drummer, known as a hothead among the band members, attacked Europe and stabbed him in the throat with a penknife. Europe bled out and died while in the hospital later that night.

The legacy of the Harlem Hellfighters Band is as grand and all encompassing for music as the Great War itself.  Essentially, the band is credited with spreading the popularity of Jazz throughout Europe and America. Before World War I, Jazz was a niche genre of music, common only among African Americans living in certain areas of New York, New Orleans, and Chicago.  After the exploits of the Harlem Hellfighters Band Jazz would spread across the world, becoming the dominant form of popular music up to the 1950′s and serving as the predecessor to popular music styles today such as rock, hip hop, pop, and soul.

Did Europeans “civilize” the Americas? Actually, anthropologists tell us that “hunters and gatherers were relatively peaceful, compared to agriculturalists, and that modern societies were more warlike still. Thus violence increases with civilization.


[…] Textbooks cannot resist contrasting "primitive” Americans with modern Europeans.


[…] Europeans persuaded Natives to specialize in the fur and slave trades. Native Americans were better hunters and trappers than Europeans, and with the guns the Europeans sold them, they became better still. Other Native skills began to atrophy.


[…] because whites “demanded institutions reflective of their own with which to relate,” many Native groups strengthened their tribal governments… New confederations and nations developed.. The tribes also became more male- dominated, in imitation of Europeans.. [there was] an escalation of Indian warfare… [the slave trade helped] to deagriculturize Native Americans. To avoid being targets for capture, Indians abandoned their cornfields and their villages.


[…] "Europeans did not “civilize” or “settle” roaming Indians, but had the opposite impact.


[…] According to Benjamin Franklin, “All their government is by Counsel of the Sages. There is no Force; there are no Prisons, no officers to compel Obedience, or inflict Punishment.” Probably foremost, the lack of hierarchy in the Native socieites in the eastern United States attracted the admiration of European observers. Frontiersmen were taken with the extent to which Native Americans enjoyed freedom as individuals. Women were also accorded more status and power.. than in white societies of the time.


[…] "Indeed, Native American ideas may be partly responsible for our democratic institutions. We have seen how Native ideas of liberty, fraternity, and equality found their way to Europe to influence social philosophers such as Thomas More, Locke, Montaigne, Montesquieu, and Rousseau… Through 150 years of colonial contact, the Iroquois League stood before the colonies as an object lesson in how to govern a large domain democratically.


[…] John Mohawk has argued that American Indians are directly or indirectly responsible for the public-meeting tradition, free speech, democracy, and “all those things which got attached to the Bill of Rights.” Without the Native example, “do you really believe that all those ideas would have found birth among a people who had spent a millennium butchering other people because of intolerance of questions of religion?”


[…] Indian warfare absorbed 80 percent of the entire federal budget during George Washington’s administration and dogged his successors for a century as a major issue and expense… [in many cases] the settlers were Native American, the scalpers white.


[…] All the textbooks tell how Jefferson “doubled the size of the United States by buying Louisiana from France.” Not one points out that it was not France’s land to sell–it was Indian land… Indeed, France did not really sell Louisiana for $15,000,000. France merely sold its claim to the territory… Equally Eurocentric are the maps textbooks use to show the Lewis and Clark expedition. They make Native American invisible, implying that the United States bought vacant land from the French… [Textbooks imply that the Indians were naive about land ownership, but] the problem lay in whites’ not abiding by accepted concepts of land ownership.


[…] The most important cause of the War of 1812.. was land– Indian land… The United States fought five of the seven major land battles of the War of 1812 primarily against Native Americans… [a] result of the War of 1812 was the loss of part of our history. A century of learning [from Native Americans] was coming to a close… until 1815 the word Americans had generally been used to refer to Native Americans; after 1815 it meant European Americans… Carleton Beals has written that “our acquiescence in Indian dispossession has molded the American character.” … destroyed our national idealism. From 1815 on, instead of spreading democracy, we exported the ideology of white supremacy. Gradually we sought American hegemony over Mexico, the Philippines, much of the Caribbean basin, and, indirectly, over other nations… We also have to admit that Adolf Hitler displayed more knowledge of how we treated Native Americans than American high schoolers who rely on their textbooks. Hitler admired our concentration camps for Indians in the west “and often praised to his inner circle the efficiency of America’s extermination–by starvation and uneven combat” as the model for his extermination of Jews and Gypsies.


[…] Yet we “still stereotype Native Americans as roaming primitive hunting folk, unfortunate victims of progress.

— 

Excerpts from  Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong 

by James W. Loewen