west african

Fun Fact: People like to make fun of “ebonics” or the English patois spoken by inner city black Americans because they think these folks are trying to speak “proper English” and failing. Linguists see this as a legitimate language in its own right with African syntax and some African vocabulary, for example, the use of “I be” instead of “I am” as in “I be going to the store” is a common usage in West African languages. 

In fact, it has been said that this language was closer to the English spoken by ordinary white southerners (not of the elite planter caste) 150 years ago than the modern “southern” dialect. Proof of this can be seen in literary works of that time where the author reproduces the dialect.

Looking to learn your language? (UPDATED!!)

The following are good  free online language  resources for learning different languages spoken in West Africa. Feel free to add on to the list if you know of another resource to help people.

Yoruba

Yorùbá Yé Mi

UPenn Yoruba Vocabulary

I Love Languages- Yoruba

My Languages- Yoruba

University of Georgia- Yoruba

LearnYoruba.com

Yoruba- Basic Course/ Tapes

Hausa

Rapport Hausa Course

Headstart Hausa Course

UCLA Hausa Resources

Byki Hausa Vocabulary List

UPenn Hausa Vocabulary

Boston University Hausa Resources

I Love Languages- Hausa

Hausa Tapes

Hausa- Basic Course

Wolof

UCLA Wolof Resources

UPenn Wolof Vocabulary

Boston University Wolof Resources

LAAF Wolof Lessons

Indiana University Wolof Folktales and Songs

Indiana University Wolof Lessons

Twi

UPenn Twi Vocabulary

Akan Pronunciation Game (helps you learn the tones)

Some Vocabulary 

Twi Tapes

Peace Corps Twi

Indiana University Twi Folktales and Songs

Indiana University Twi Lessons

Igbo

UPenn Igbo Vocabulary

Igbo Net

Some Igbo Vocabulary 

I Love Languages- Igbo

Igbo- Basic Course

Mandinka

LAAF Mandinka lessons

Bambara 

LAAF Bambara lessons

Peace Corps Bambara

Indiana University Bambara Lessons

Indiana University Folktales and Songs in Bambara

Mooré

LAAF Mooré lessons

Mooré Tapes

Mooré Basic Course

Fula(ni)/ Pulaar

Fula- Basic Course

Ewe

Some Vocabulary 

Ewe Greetings and Basics

Bade

University of California Bade

Bole

University of California Bole

Duwai

University of California Duwai

Karekare

University of California Karekare

Maka

University of California Maka

Ngamo

University of California Ngamo

Ngizim

University of California Ngizim

Miya

University of California Miya

I added some additional websites as well as languages. Also I would like to state that is in no way meant to be a comprehensive list of all of the languages of west Africa. There are literally hundreds upon hundreds of languages and I cannot find resources for them all. I will keep adding to this list.

Can you all stop perpetuating the lie that ALL Africans are poor?

SOUTH AFRICA

NIGERIA

GHANA

MOROCCAN MALL

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And that ALL Americans are rich/middle class?

ATLANTA, GEORGIA (UNITED STATES)

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS (UNITED STATES)

DETROIT, MICHIGAN (UNITED STATES)

L.A. COUNTY, CALIFORNIA (UNITED STATES)

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Stop believing everything you see in the media. Some places in Africa are very poor, but some places are not poor at all. Just like there are some places in America that are very poor, but some places that are not poor at all. A few pictures and videos from the media about “how poor Africa is” should not determine how you view that entire continent because if that were the case, many would assume ALL Americans lived in poverty based on the few pictures I’ve shown you. Open your minds.

Jollof aka Wolof Rice is a one-pot rice dish popular in many West African countries, similar to European Pilaf or Paella, and possibly a progenitor of the Louisianian dish Jambalaya. It’s consumed throughout Mali, Togo, Gambia, Senegal, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Cameroon, and Ghana. There are many variations, but usually it contains rice, tomatoes, tomato paste, onions, salt, spices such as nutmeg, ginger, pepper, cumin, and chili peppers; optional ingredients include vegetables, meats, or fish. Because of the tomato paste and palm oil, the dish is always red in color.