weisswurst

anonymous asked:

Well, I imagine it wasn't too long after they moved in together. One morning, while Yang and Blake were off at the library, Ruby decides to make Weiss some coffee, and well. Weiss has a morning icicle. Ruby's quite shocked, and Weiss is sure she's going to report it, but as days pass and Ruby behaves normally, Weiss is like "the hell?" and pulls Ruby aside about it. She's all "you haven't said anything?" and Ruby's all "Not even to Yang, which is a first." (part 2 to follow)

weissicle.png

Die Weisswurst is a traditional Bavarian sausage made from minced veal and pork back bacon, usually flavored with parsley, lemon, mace, onions, ginger, and cardamom. Weisswürste traditionally were manufactured early in the morning and eaten as a snack between breakfast and lunch - there’s an old saying that fresh sausages should not hear the noon chime of the church bells. Traditionally, they’re only served until midday because preservatives are not used, the meat is not smoked, and hence the sausage is made fresh every day. In the past without refrigeration, this was the reason for the church bell saying but even today, these are preferably eaten fresh earlier in the day. They’re heated in water (but not boiled) for about 10 mins, which will turn them white as no color-preserving nitrite is used. They’re brought to the table in a big bowl in the hot water to stay warm and are eaten without the skin, together with Bavarian sweet mustard, Brezen (fresh pretzel), and Weissbier. Weisswurst, whose consumption is associated with Bayern (Bavaria), helped coin the humorous term “Weißwurstäquator” (“white sausage equator”), that delineates a cultural boundary, separating the linguistic, cultural, and culinary traditions of Bavaria and Southern Germany from the rest of the country. 

Der Weißwurstäquator (“white sausage equator”) is a humorous term describing the supposed cultural boundary separating Southern Germany, especially Bayern (Bavaria), from the rest of Germany. It’s named for Bavaria’s traditional sausage. There’s no precise definition of the Weißwurstäquator; it’s sometimes taken to correspond with the linguistic boundary known as the Speyer line, separating Upper German from Central German dialects, roughly following the Main river. Sometimes, it’s taken to run further south, more or less along the Donau (Danube) river line, or between the Main and Donau, roughly along the 49th parallel north circle of latitude. Pictured above are the various definitions: 1) the Speyer line (green), 2) river Main line as the frontier of Prussian hegemony before 1871 (red), 3) the 49° latitude (black). "Karte Weißwurstäquator" by NordNordWest - licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

do you know how many times i tried to spell weisswurst right in the tags of that post on my phone and because my phone app is fucked i had to delete the whole post and do it over again every time i messed up so i gave up