weight prejudice

hospittlefood  asked:

hello! i love your blog, and it's helping me immensely in my ED recovery. i have a question: one of the biggest "fat is unhealthy" arguments i hear revolves around how obesity rates are increasing, and that obesity hurts everyone due to the rising healthcare costs surrounding supposed fat-induced diseases. can you shed some light on why people are getting larger, and how this is negatively impacting healthcare costs? thanks so much!

It’s fairly well established in the scientific literature that people are fatter now than they were a generation ago. The fat-phobic movie, Wall-E, does a good job illustrating most people’s vision of this so-called “obesity epidemic.”

Originally posted by coltonhyanes

But how much fatter are we?

Estimates vary, but the consensus is that the average person today weighs about 8 - 15lbs more than the average person in the 1960s. That’s it. About 10 lbs., or one clothing size.  

What caused us to get fatter?

Despite all the speculation concerning the causes of this population change – sugary drinks, processed foods, sedentary jobs, the moon – the fact is that we don’t know why it happened. Similar gains have been observed among non-human animals, leading some people to speculate that environmental toxins are to “blame.” But it may remain a mystery. 

“But what about the cost of all the fatties?!?!”

Frankly, that line of argument is gross and discriminatory. It is appalling to single out a group of people and try to calculate how much it “costs” to provide health care to that group. 

In addition, such calculations rest on a number of faulty assumptions, the most glaring of which being the assumptions that fat causes the health conditions that are associated with higher body weight, that weight loss is possible, and that weight loss improves health, none of which are supported by the scientific literature. 

So the fact that those arguments are common doesn’t make them valid, it just reveals how fat-phobic most people are.

- Mod D

Here are some quotes Jennifer Lawrence has made over the years regarding her weight:

“I’d rather look chubby on screen and like a person in real life.” – Mirror

“In Hollywood, I’m obese. I’m considered a fat actress, I’m Val Kilmer in that one picture on the beach.”– HuffPost

“I eat like a caveman. I’ll be the only actress that doesn’t have anorexia rumors.” – Entertainment Weekly

“I’m never going to starve myself for a part. I don’t want little girls to be like, ‘Oh, I want to look like Katniss, so I’m going to skip dinner!’ […]I was trying to get my body to look fit and strong, not thin and underfed.” – Entertainment Weekly

“If anybody even tries to whisper the word 'diet,’ I’m like, 'You can go f- yourself.” – The Gaurdian

“What are you gonna do? Be hungry every single day to make other people happy? That’s just dumb.”– The Daily Mail

Tumblr celebrates her in .gif as a paragon of quirk and body acceptance, but one thing that may have escaped your notice in the orgiastic celebration of JLaw realness that is the Internet, is that Jennifer Lawrence is a fit, attractive, 20-something woman.

Let’s concede the point here that she is, perhaps, a size or two above the accepted Hollywood norm. It’s admirable, being the star of a movie franchise aimed at teens, that she is concerned about the effect a too-svelte appearance might have on her audience, who are already bombarded with negative body messages every day. But how her statements are being delivered – and how zealous and adoring fans have interpreted her words – only reinforce our cultural standards, and perpetuate the myth that only one type of body is acceptable.

I’m not going to cover the fact that it’s messed up that a girl like Jennifer Lawrence has to justify her perfectly gorgeous body to every single media consumer in the world. We all know that’s messed up. Let’s focus instead on the fact that in order to appease our own self-doubt about our weight, we, the Internet, have decided to ignore how body-shaming the entire image of JLaw, “Spirit Animal” to fat girls everywhere, really is.

First of all, consider her quotes. She would rather look chubby on screen, but like a person in real life? This is a message of positivity only for people who consider themselves chubby, and it comes at the expense of women who are thin. Maybe they’re thin because they’re sick. Maybe they’re naturally slender. But when someone says they would rather “look like a person” than look thin, the message between the lines is that thin people don’t look like people.

I want to know, Internet: at what percentage of body fat does a woman earn the right to be a person?

I’m certain that some of my fellow fatties looked at that quote and rolled their eyes. We know that weighing more doesn’t grant one personhood, because our alleged lack of self-control and dignity are directly linked to that body fat percentage. Fat people are not people in our culture. They’re “fat people.” So, what does that quote do? It’s not empowering to anyone but women who look like Jennifer Lawrence. And it’s not a coincidence that she just happens to be the Coke-bottle standard we’re told men should prefer.

I can’t help but think of the .gifs floating around Tumblr, the ones where Lawrence talks about how much food she eats, how she loves McDonald’s fries. Would the Internet have embraced those quotes coming from a larger actress? Someone like Melissa McCarthy?

I’ve noticed a funny thing about Melissa McCarthy. Well, besides the obvious, that she’s funny. But I’ve noticed that when Jennifer Lawrence talks about her weight, she talks about how much food she eats, and how she’s never going to diet to be thin. And when Melissa McCarthy is quoted about her weight, this is what she says:

“I don’t know why I’m not thinner than I am. I don’t really drink soda; I don’t have a sweet tooth, and we eat healthfully at home. We’re all weird for broccoli and pureed-vegetable soup, which we almost always have a big pot of in the fridge – it’s so good!” – Fox News

“I just don’t lose weight easily.” – People.com

“Sometimes I wish I were just magically a size 6 and I never had to give it a single thought.”– Us Magazine

Because Melissa McCarthy actually is a fat woman, she isn’t allowed to make brash statements about body acceptance. She has to apologize for her body. Every single one of those quotes might as well have just said, “Sorry I’m fat and you have to look at me, everyone.” But it’s all she’s allowed to say, in the confines of our culture. If Melissa McCarthy had said, “If anybody even tries to whisper the word 'diet,’ I’m like, 'You can go f- yourself,” the response will most assuredly not be, “How brave! How strong! What a good role model!” The response will be, “What a bad example, encouraging people to be unhealthy! We have an obesity epidemic! Open your eyes, fat is not healthy, sexy, or acceptable! How very dare she!” Even the mild statements she has made about being comfortable with herself and her body are greeted with backlash from armchair internet physicians bleating about health and lifestyle choices.

Imagine if Melissa McCarthy had made so many public comments about food and McDonald’s. It wouldn’t be cute or funny, it would be schtick. Look at the fat woman, being human and hungry for something bad for her! How grotesquely humorous it is when fat people eat! When Jennifer Lawrence makes these comments, it’s acceptable, because her body is still pleasing to our cultural expectation of voluptuous, slim-waisted, long-necked female beauty.

When Jennifer Lawrence says it’s “dumb” to go hungry to make other people happy, she’s saying it with the carefree attitude of a woman who probably will never have to make that choice to conform. Yes, she’ll be asked to diet for a role, and she feels the same pressure to meet cultural expectations as everyone else. But a woman who looks like Jennifer Lawrence doesn’t have to shop for her clothes in online stores because no physical storefronts carry her size. A woman who looks like Jennifer Lawrence probably isn’t going to have a stranger try to stage an impromptu intervention in a Pizza Hut because they’re so, so concerned for her “health.” If a woman who looks like Jennifer Lawrence goes to her doctor to complain of an ailment, she’ll be offered diagnostic tests instead of a diet plan. Jennifer Lawrence can say it’s “dumb” to go on a diet, but Jennifer Lawrence might not be facing weight-related prejudice or illness. Jennifer Lawrence may never be forced to make the choice between going hungry to lose weight versus having a knee and hip replacement at 35.

The reason Jennifer Lawrence is allowed to be a body-positive role model to young girls and “chubby” women is because she is representative of conventional beauty. Jennifer Lawrence’s public image has been built on a foundation of fat girl drag. She can say she’s “obese” by Hollywood standards, but the claim is laughable when women like Melissa McCarthy also make their living in the same industry and aren’t afforded the privilege of unapologetic expression Lawrence enjoys as a conventionally attractive person.

The message of body acceptance built on Jennifer Lawrence’s soundbites only empowers those who are willing to ignore the fact that her statements reinforce our current cultural views, rather than subverting them.

—  Huffpost
If Any Of My Followers Support Nicole Arbour

Here’s some basic ACTUAL facts for you to consider.

*The deadly kind of fat is visceral fat (the kind around your organs which doesn’t make you look fat). Not subcutaneous fat (the kind that makes you look fat). In other words, you can be skinny and have heart disease. You can be fat and be fine. Claiming you’re only fat-shaming “because you care about health” is bullshit. Why doesn’t Nicole Arbour yell at skinny people who eat like crap? Because she’s lying.

*Obesity is linked more with malnutrition due to poverty NOT due to a decadent diet. Arbour is literally mocking people too poor to get enough good food.

*Read up on the insulin response, ghrelin, leptin, and the lack of availability of good food/affordable food in poorer neighborhoods. Then tell me its all due to overeating and laziness. Hint: Its not, and Nicole Arbour has probably never even heard those words.

*Healthy weight is 80% diet and only 20% exercise. So even if you exercise a lot, people who cannot afford good food CANNOT exercise enough to make up for poor diet. What’s more, people living in poverty tend to be busy with multiple jobs and can’t afford childcare, so they have even less time to exercise.

*Satire is about punching up at the people/institutions in power. That’s the ENTIRE point of satire. Kicking someone who is already oppressed or mistreated by society and then winking about it is NOT satire. It’s being an ASSHOLE.

*Fat people (even children, who do not make their own dietary choices and thus have no control over their weight) face extreme prejudice, mocking, and even harassment. People have been assaulted for being fat. People are denied jobs based on their weight. Fat people have higher rates of depression than their peers who weigh less. For people who have to face this sort of abuse everyday, a fat-shaming video is straight out psychological torment. If Nicole Arbour actually cared about fat people, she would care about their mental health and how her bullying affects that.

*Bullying is bullying no matter who you do it to. I don’t care how much you may dislike fat people or how they don’t fit into your ideal aesthetic. People don’t exist on this planet to please YOU. If someone is not hurting anyone, you have no right to verbally assault them and make them feel bad for merely existing.

*That poor child who sat next to Nicole Arbour on the plane deserves a goddamn award for enduring a flight next to such an unpleasant person and keeping his cool. If I were forced to sit next to that vacuous idiot, I would probably toss a biology textbook and an instructional pamphlet on how to actually tell a fucking joke into her lap, and say “Make better choices.”

BODY SHAMING & GLAMOURISING MENTAL ILLNESS

As of now, you’re all pretty much aware of the comment Oli Sykes had made in defence of Acacia Brinley. What angers me most is that no one actually wants to take a step in confronting this issue entirely.

It was wrong for fans to post judgmental and hateful comments in regards to Acacia being promoted by @dropdeadofficial but DD should have expected that prior to selecting her as one of their “models”.

The fan and customer base for both DD and BMTH is notorious for its strong community of people who have tackled or are currently dealing with mental disorders. From what I know about the fan base is that these fans who unfortunately suffer from disorders commonly have depression, social anxiety and anorexia.

When you promote and choose someone to be the face of your brand, it has to be someone who fits in with both your brand and customer base. Although I have absolutely no issues with Acacia, selecting her was a poor decision as she contradicts with your customer base.

Acacia is not disliked for being “skinny” or “too pretty” but is disliked due to her stating that she suffers from social anxiety and other mental disorders in order to make herself seem quirky and different.

Using someone like Acacia in association with your brand is a blatant act of contribution to a degrading culture focusing on the beautification of something so serious. DD is perhaps unknowingly contributing to a culture which is actively making it ok for those who are actually suffering to disregard their illness and not seek help because they should succumb to the “beauty” of their sadness. I am close to many people who suffer from many degrees of mental illnesses. It is not beautiful or fashionable. They are often devastated by the romanticism of something that is ruining them completely.

It was an extremely poor decision to use her as the face of DD.

Although the fans were wrong to post hateful comments, it was even more outrageous that someone who is looked up to as a “life saver” and “inspiration” a.k.a OLI SYKES thought that it was okay to fat shame and degrade HIS OWN FANS in defence of one girl.

Body shaming is completely wrong. He blatantly insulted and demeans his fans because of size and appearance, which explicitly sends the message that certain bodies are worthy and others are not.

The mean-spirited body shaming message encourage weight discrimination, prejudices and social stigmatization; and dismisses social responsibility and ethics.

Put it into perspective that Acacia portraying mental disorders as a quirk WILL trigger your fans. If Drop Dead’s marketing team were articulate enough to predict the pro’s and con’s of utilising her, they should expect this (even though it is wrong).

Fans and customers, you do not need to continue to support this brand. You can like a celebrity but you do not have to support their every action. You need to STEP UP and SPEAK OUT against their hypocrisy or people like Oli will think it’s okay to continue to walk over you just because of their celebrity status.

It is NOT okay to glamorise disorders whether you do or don’t suffer from it and it is also NOT okay to body shame people,

DO NOT support a brand that is founded by someone who is ignorant, hypocritical and think its acceptable to body shame. DO NOT support a brand that likes to glamourise antisocial behaviour. DO NOT support a brand that supports someone who actively contributes in the glamorisation of mental disorders.

This is why I believe that we should BOYCOTT Drop Dead UNTILL their founder, Oliver Sykes, apologises for his demeaning comment and Drop Dead reconsiders their approach on marketing.

cherryandsisters  asked:

ok but bruh hear me out, will and nico do get married but never have any kids because nico's childhood sucked and he's too scared to inflict that onto his own kid if he has one and will loves kids but him and nico have agreed that their life is too dangerous to have kids but. they're every other kids fave uncles

Okay yes this actually makes a lot of sense to me because Nico has lived with the trademarked Son of Hades Stigma for his entire life and he knows that any child of his is going to carry that same weight - there are some prejudices that can’t just be wiped clean. Plus, being a child of one of the big three (not to mention the lord of the dead), he knows he can never give his kid a monster-free childhood.

But I also think that the next generation would give Nico this profound sense of hope. Like imagine his reaction when Frank and Hazel have their first kid and she is so beautiful, with Hazel’s eyes and Frank’s smile, and Nico cries for joy for the first time since he was small.

And he and Will would like 100% be those brilliant uncles who show up for dinner with crazy presents from exotic places and the weirdest stories imaginable like “today Uncle Nico told me about the time he used a hamburger to raise the dead” and “Uncle Will says when they first met Uncle Nico was wearing the most horrific hawaiian print shirt imaginable.”

(Also none of the kids are sure whether they’re in love or just hate each other’s guts because they can literally bicker for hours on end but they hold hands under the table the whole time.)

shardsoflesbianism  asked:

hi! my parents are really fatphobic and believe that obesity in america is "a choice". I tried to explain that often it was linked to poverty but they still didn't believe me. do you have a tag or some decent articles that could explain why obesity is so high in the usa please? thank you! (also this blog is so amazing and I really appreciate the messages you share with us!)

I have posted a few articles that are relevant to explaining the natural human phenomenon of weight diversity: [1]…[2]…[3]. 

These links may also be helpful in convincing them that weight loss doesn’t work and is harmful anyway: [1]…[2]…[3].

But honestly, explaining the science behind weight diversity is unlikely to change your parents’ minds unless you also attack the core belief systems that cause them to hate and fear fatness in the first place.

Fat phobia is rooted in the belief that you can read a person’s moral character in their body. In this worldview, fatness is the physical manifestation of a weak character, a visible sign of one’s inability to remain moderate in the face of the excesses of modern life. From these beliefs come harmful stereotypes about fat people – that we are lazy, weak willed, unintelligent, uncivilized – along with the belief that fat people deserve to suffer, and be excluded, and even die, just because of the size of our bodies.

So throw the whole scientific book at them, hammer them with facts. But at the same time, keep challenging those emotion-based beliefs that feed their hatred and fear of fatness. Challenge their assumption that you can judge a person’s character by what they look like. Confront them when they make prejudiced or stereotypical remarks about fat folks. Empathize with fat people. Share our successes. 

Humanize fat people. 

And then maybe you will really start to get somewhere.

- Mod D

aka-s-adventures  asked:

Hi Muun! I've been feeling down with my writing and I remembered how much I admired yours. I've always loved the comics you do with Chira, but not until this year I found the pieces you put on littlefoolery. I especially enjoyed STW prequels, I felt I got a huge glimpse of characters. I wondered if I could ask some advice if you have time? I had a professor say if you can write your story in 3rd POV then do it, 1st means you have no talent. My baby story is in 1st and I feel dejected to continue

Hi! Thank you so much for your nice comments about my comics! I’m so glad if I can write a story that really captures people’s imaginations and I really hope to keep doing so.

Let me voice my very, very strong disagreement with your professor. If your professor feels writing a story in first person is an indication of having no talent, he has just dismissed such works as The Great Gatsby, The Sun Also Rises, Middlesex, One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, and To-Kill-A-Fucking- Mockingbird ferchrisake.

Yes, first person is really accessible form of writing.  Yes, writing from first person is often used as a good shorthand for creating a bond with your protagonist because you start off right in your protagonist’s head.  Yes, it’s an immediate way to place the reader in a Time and a Place. Yes, like all shorthands, this can be used well or be used poorly. 

The key to using it well is to make use of first person’s strength– which is, immediacy, character voice, and a narrowed perspective.  Having a distinct voice is important because if you can’t make the way your character talks to the reader distinct, your character is only going to sound like you, or else the reader’s just going to hear themselves, reading the book outloud.

Now, some books do use this to their advantage. The Twilight books, whatever you can say about their quality, make use of this in order to capture Bella as a cipher for the young girls reading them. Bella lacks distinction so that the reader can impose themselves on her.  This is probably pretty dang intentional on behalf of the author and is often a staple of romance novels in general – this isn’t in of itself a mark of poor quality, this is WHAT THAT PARTICULAR GENRE DOES.

This isn’t to say indistinct narrators are a mark of fiction that should just be considered niche or pulp.  The Great Gatsby’s Nick Carraway is actually a fairly passive and indistinct narrator – this is, once again, the point. F. Scott Fitzgerald treats his inaction and tendency to observe and not act as a character point.  It’s also punctuated by another particularly fun trick of first person: NICK IS UNRELIABLE AS HELL. Another fun trick you can play with a first person narrator!

Meanwhile, you have Scout in To Kill A Mockingbird, a character with a very youthful, very distinct voice. She also demonstrates use of perspective in first person: as a young child, Scout’s views on the world around her are very limited. Readers are beholden to her point of view, but as her point of view is that of a very young child, freeing her from a lot of the more horrible weighted prejudices very much present in the book.  Readers are also actively drawn in to the narrative by virtue of the fact they come at it from an older perspective. What Scout sees and what the reader sees are and should occasionally be a bit different. It’s basically turning the reader into an active participant in the novel – as opposed to simply someone sitting behind the main character’s eyes.

Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, though I have mixed feelings about it as a book, is a really effective use of first person because it pretty much goes to town with the biased, unreliable narrator. The two narrators, Amy and Nick, have really really distinct voices from each other. They come from different backgrounds. They’ve had very different upbringings. They have a completely different set of horrible complexes and damages and hurts that mean they focus on completely different things.  They also both lie to the reader, but again, in very different ways. Figuring out how each of them lie, especially about each other, is ultimately the key holding the entire book together, but the important thing is: You can read each of their chapters out loud and never ever mistake who was who. 

Voice is really key. You need to not only consider HOW your character talks, you need to consider why your character is talking, who they might be talking to, and what, with their particular experiences and preferences, they might chose to focus on. Is your character the sort of person who would spend three paragraphs talking about another character’s dress? Is your character preoccupied with violence to the point they’d enjoy telling you how they beat up an antagonist? Is your character reticent about some things? Is there something they’d omit from their personal narrative? If so, why?   Ernest Hemingway’s Jake Barnes will go on at great length about the pomp of the bullfights, but he forever talks around how he was injured during WW1. (spoilers: it rendered him impotent)

One of my favorite young adult books I’ve recently read that makes really really good use of character voice is Megan Whalen Turner’s The Thief.  The main character, Gen, is a sassy thief who has been caught and conscripted to go on a treasure hunting adventure alongside his captors.  How he reacts to his circumstances and what he chooses to tell you about himself and what he witnesses wind up being very important over the course of the story. More to the point, the book takes in advantage of the fact first person is ultimately someone telling you the story. Storytelling is a big thing The Thief. Characters swap myths and legends with each other, and their reasons for sharing these myths and legends and which ones they choose are very much indicative of their priorities.

Because ultimately, the best questions to ask about first person are these: who is telling you this story, and WHY are they telling you this story.

And the thing that makes or breaks it? Is, once again, the voice. A hardboiled detective shouldn’t sound like a British schoolgirl. And a British schoolgirl probably shouldn’t sound like a hardboiled detective– unless you’re going for a particularly unique genre shift!  Jake Barnes isn’t going to sound like Scout. Scout isn’t going to sound like the adult Cal in Middlesex. Remembering and understanding the difference between these characters and how they speak to their reader is key to a successful use of first person.

So, er, tldr; First person is a writing tool. The use of first person in of itself isn’t an indication of quality. There are plenty of great books written in first person. There are plenty of bad books written in third.  It’s all about what works best for the character, the story, and the writer.  It’s also about what works best for you.  Write the story the way your character wants it to be told. If you can capture their unique voice, you can capture the story.

I hope this helps.

w0rdinista  asked:

Fenris/Hawke: Austen AU. >;D

“Forgive me,” said she, “but I must believe I have mis-heard you. Am I to understand that you have made me a proposal?”

His features flickered with surprise; he said, “Just so.”

“Excuse me. I meant to give you the opportunity to demur. I will not believe you to be serious in making me an offer of marriage.”

Abruptly, he rose to his feet. “This is your refusal?”

“You have given me every reason to refuse you.”

Fenris crossed to the fireplace with quick steps, agitation in every movement. She was not used to seeing him any less than composed; it gratified and embarrassed her at once, but did not sway her. At length he turned to her and said, “Will you tell me what you mean? or does it please your vanity to keep me in ignorance?”

At once she saw that he believed himself to be the injured party, and her pity fled her heart. “You cannot be serious, sir.”

“You mock me.”

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

As soon as I tell anyone I'm autistic they ask me if I do coding/programming and I don't know why? Is assuming what someone's job is a normal thing for NTs or what? It's very confusing and I'm never sure how to answer.

Generally an NT will hear “autistic” and immediately think STEM, the usual assumptions are “mathematician” and “computer programming”. I think it’s mostly because that’s… well, it’s what people assume, so them assuming it makes other people assume it as well and it’s this endless cycle. There’s also this tendency to bring up the Autistic Greats and that’s always like Einstein and Darwin and Isaac Newton and other science-y people, but never like Mozart or Michelangelo or Hans Christian Andersen. And when autistic artists do come up it’s almost always in the form of “idiot savant” which is its whole own kind of gross. And then people never think we can have just normal jobs like retail or deskwork or even jobs like fashion or piloting or politics or teaching or, well, anything! And then if they assume you’re “too high-functioning” (yeuch) they never consider that, hey, maybe you don’t have a job at all.

At the base of it they just don’t really see us as the amazingly huge, diverse variety of people we are. Or as people at all sometimes. They just see Sheldon Cooper or the Rain Man or “my sister’s husband’s cousin’s stepson who’s SO AUTISTIC you wouldn’t believe it”. Or even farther removed from being people, as aliens like Spock or androids like Data. They hear “autistic” and they already have a singular idea in their head of What An Autistic Is and they base all their assumptions off it.

You’d think they’d have better imaginations with how much flack they give us for “being too literal” :P

As for how to answer? Well, if you’re not say no, if you are say yes, and then maybe, if you’re feeling up to it, ask them why they assumed that. Ask why they assume you’re a coder just because you’re autistic and watch them crumble under the weight of their own prejudice. And then tell them autistics can be - and are- anything and everything possible.

-Brother Cat

Imagine if Melissa McCarthy had made so many public comments about food and McDonald’s. It wouldn’t be cute or funny, it would be schtick. Look at the fat woman, being human and hungry for something bad for her! How grotesquely humorous it is when fat people eat! When Jennifer Lawrence makes these comments, it’s acceptable, because her body is still pleasing to our cultural expectation of voluptuous, slim-waisted, long-necked female beauty.
When Jennifer Lawrence says it’s “dumb” to go hungry to make other people happy, she’s saying it with the carefree attitude of a woman who probably will never have to make that choice to conform. Yes, she’ll be asked to diet for a role, and she feels the same pressure to meet cultural expectations as everyone else. But a woman who looks like Jennifer Lawrence doesn’t have to shop for her clothes in online stores because no physical storefronts carry her size. A woman who looks like Jennifer Lawrence probably isn’t going to have a stranger try to stage an impromptu intervention in a Pizza Hut because they’re so, so concerned for her “health.” If a woman who looks like Jennifer Lawrence goes to her doctor to complain of an ailment, she’ll be offered diagnostic tests instead of a diet plan. Jennifer Lawrence can say it’s “dumb” to go on a diet, but Jennifer Lawrence might not be facing weight-related prejudice or illness. Jennifer Lawrence may never be forced to make the choice between going hungry to lose weight versus having a knee and hip replacement at 35.
The reason Jennifer Lawrence is allowed to be a body-positive role model to young girls and “chubby” women is because she is representative of conventional beauty. Jennifer Lawrence’s public image has been built on a foundation of fat girl drag. She can say she’s “obese” by Hollywood standards, but the claim is laughable when women like Melissa McCarthy also make their living in the same industry and aren’t afforded the privilege of unapologetic expression Lawrence enjoys as a conventionally attractive person.