we have learned

No lie. I’ve been watching it for 5min straight. It’s been months and i’m still not over it.

remember when ten year old edward elric bit his brother, ate two ants then had an existential crisis all within the same minute 

All jokes aside I think it’s really amazing how Hebrew was literally brought back to life by a bunch of enthusiasts and how what once was essentially a dead language is spoken nowadays by millions of people

I hear it on the streets and can’t stop thinking about how just a couple of centuries ago nobody was speaking it, and now it’s living and breathing just like any other natural language, with modern words and slang and shitty pop songs and children learning their first words in it

But it is also thousands of years old technically

This is wild

Hello everyone, it is friday and I would like to share this small section of a drawing that contains a friendly bee who is sunbathing

thank you xox

9

Please papa SEGA, let Sonic have more than 2 pairs of slick kicks.

Being a lesbian is a uniquely alienating experience because not only do we have to learn the paradigms of attraction to women in a society that does not give us a script for those interactions, but we also have to unlearn the paradigms of attraction to men that have been forced on us our whole lives. It’s an incredibly hard thing to do and every lesbian is doing a great job and I am proud of you all

This post is not for terfs and it is for trans lesbians

N̡ͫ̚e̊̊͒̆v̨̔̌ͬͧ̎̋ͣȇ̌̓̃ͦ̌̂ȓ̄͘-̐̃Ė͋͂ͩ̓͛͏n̽̎̃̈̃ͫ́dͮͮͮͯ̅̀ͪi̅͗ͤ̆̉̍͝n̈́̀̉ḡ ͐́ͦ͋N̛ĩ̓̉͋̓̌ǵ̏̾ͬh̴̔ͯ̿ͭt̂̊m̈́̏ͪ͐ͥ̚â̶̊̂͆̿ͪrͦ̂̃ͬ́̄̈e̵͆̊̎

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A YEAR WITHOUT A PRESIDENT

It seems like forever, but it was just one year ago that Donald Trump was elected president. So what have we learned about the presidency and who is running the country? 

1. The first big thing we’ve learned is that Trump is not really the president of the United States – because he’s not governing.

A president who’s governing doesn’t blast his Attorney General for doing his duty and recusing himself from an FBI investigation of the president.

A president who’s governing doesn’t leave the top echelons of departments and agencies empty for almost a year.

He doesn’t publicly tell his Secretary of State he’s wasting time trying to open relations with North Korea. Any president with the slightest interest in governing would already know and approve of what his Secretary of State was doing.

He doesn’t fire half his key White House staff in the first nine months, creating utter chaos.

A president who is governing works with his cabinet and staff to develop policy. He doesn’t just tweet new public policy out of the blue – for example, that transgender people can’t serve in the military. His Secretary of Defense is likely to have some thoughts on the matter – and if not consulted might decide to ignore the tweet.

He doesn’t just decide to withdraw from the Paris Accord without any reason or analysis.

A president who is governing works with Congress. He doesn’t just punt to Congress hard decisions – as he did with DACA, the Iran nuclear deal, insurance subsidies under the Affordable Care Act, and details of his tax plan.

He doesn’t tell a crowd of supporters that he’s ended the Clean Power Plan – “Did you see what I did to that? Boom, gone” – when any such repeal requires a legal process, and must then withstand court challenges.

Instead of governing, Donald Trump has been insulting, throwing tantrums, and getting even:

Equating white supremacists with people who protest against them. Questioning the patriotism of NFL players who are peacefully protesting police violence and racism.

Making nasty remarks about journalists, about his predecessor as president, his political opponent in the last election, national heroes like Congressman John Lewis and Senator John McCain, even the mayor of San Juan Puerto Rico.

Or he’s busy lying and then covering up the lies. Claiming he would have won the popular vote if millions hadn’t voted fraudulently for his opponent – without a shred of evidence to support his claim, and then setting up a fraudulent commission to find the evidence.

Or firing the head of the FBI who wouldn’t promise to be more loyal to him than to the American public.

A president’s job is to govern. Trump doesn’t know how to govern, or apparently doesn’t care. So, logically, he’s not President.

2. The second thing we’ve learned is that Trump’s influence is waning.  

Since he lost the popular vote, his approval ratings have dropped even further. One year in, Trump is the least popular president in history with only 37 percent of Americans behind him.

Most Republicans still approve of him, but that may not be for long.

He couldn’t get his pick elected to a Senate primary in Alabama, a state bulging with Trump voters.

Republican senators refused to go along with his repeal of the Affordable Care Act. And they’re taking increased interest in Russia’s interference in the 2016 election.

Business leaders deserted him over his remarks over Charlottesville. They vacated his business advisory councils.

NFL owners have turned on him over his remarks about players. Tom Brady, who once called Trump “a good friend,” now calls him “divisive” and “wrong.”

There’s no question he’s violated the Constitution. There are at least three grounds for impeachment – his violation of the emoluments clause of the Constitution by raking in money from foreign governments, his obstruction of justice by firing the head of the FBI, and his failure to faithfully execute the law by not implementing the Affordable Care Act. And a fourth if he or his aides colluded with Russia in the 2016 election.

But both houses of Congress would have to vote for his removal, which won’t happen unless Democrats win control in 2018 or Republicans in Congress decide Trump is a political liability.

3. The third big thing we’ve learned is where the governing of the country is actually occurring.

Much is being done by lobbyists for big business, who now swarm over the Trump administration like honey bees over a hedgerow of hollyhocks.

But the real leadership of America is coming from outside the Trump administration.

Leadership on the environment is now coming from California – whose rules every automaker and many other corporations have to meet in order to sell in a state that’s home to one out of eight Americans.

Leadership on civil rights is coming from the federal courts, which have struck down three different versions of Trump’s travel ban, told states their voter ID laws are unconstitutional, and pushed police departments to stop profiling and harassing minorities.

Leadership on the economy is coming from the Federal Reserve Board, whose decisions on interest rates are more important than ever now that the country lacks a fiscal policy guided by the White House.

Most of the rest of leadership in America is now coming from the grassroots – from people all over the country who are determined to reclaim our democracy and make the economy work for the many rather than the few.

They stopped Congress from repealing the Affordable Care Act.

They’re fighting Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s plan to spend taxpayer money on for-profit schools and colleges that cheat their students.

They’re fighting EPA director Scott Pruitt’s crusade against climate science.

And Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s attempts to tear down the wall between church and state.

They’re fighting against the biggest tax cut for the wealthy in American history – that will be paid for by draconian cuts in services and dangerous levels of federal debt.

They’re fighting against the bigotry, racism, and xenophobia that Trump has unleashed.

And they’re fighting for a Congress that, starting with next year’s midterm elections, will reverse everything Trump is doing to America.

But their most important effort – your effort, our effort – is not just resisting Trump. It’s laying the groundwork for a new politics in America, a new era of decency and social justice, a reassertion of the common good.

Millions are already mobilizing and organizing. It’s the one good thing that’s happened since Election Day last year – the silver lining on the dark Trump cloud.

If you’re not yet part of it, join up.

How to write a crossunder fic:

  • Pick three media properties that are as different from one another as possible.
  • We will call these A, B, and C
  • Pick the characters you want to meet from A and B
  • They are in the world of C now
  • They don’t know why or how but they are trying to pretend they belong there
  • They probably aren’t great at it and the only people they are really capable of fooling are each other because they don’t know any better
  • Interactions with characters from C are minimal at best and really just cameos
  • Enjoy your stay in hell
Morning routine

자다 - To sleep

일어나다 - To get up

세수하다 - To wash one’s face

이를 닦다 - To brush one’s teeth

요리(를) 하다/ 음식을 만들다 - To cook

밥을/아침을 먹다 - To eat breakfast

설거지(를) 하다 - To wash the dishes

샤워(를) 하다 - To take a shower

버스를 타다 - To take the bus

일을 하다 - To work

A&R

Originally posted by sangatsunolion

Taako calling everyone else dust… how badly did this entire experience of staying one step ahead of the apocalypse fuck him up? Taako’s not the kind of person who seems like he makes connections easily, but I don’t think he’s unfeeling - he cares about his sister, he seems like he cares about the other members of the IPRE too just by his tone and how receptive he is when they talk to him in this entire arc. Like when he was talking to Barry, and Barry asked if he could be frank - the tone he used to answer was the same as the tone he’s often used with his sister.

How much of who Taako is now is a result of not seeing other people as people anymore, because what’s the point? How often DID he care about people in those other planes, how many people did he have to lose before he stopped trying? Was there a noticeable change, or was there an assumption that he’d always felt that way because it used to be him and Lup, because of what happened in the world with the robots? Did he warm up to the people around him, only to grow cold again?

Humans are ridiculous

I just want to throw my hat into the ring about the Humans Are Space Orcs trope that has been going around and I’ve been enjoying immensely.

You know how a large percentage of us have a fear of spiders? Even cripplingly so, like “kill it now I’m crying and breathing into a bag” kind of fear. So what if the aliens are monitoring our transmissions before making first contact, and see, for example, a bunch of Tumblr users discussing how scary spiders are?
Put that with how badass humans generally are (seriously, we invented surgery before we invented anesthetic and consume literal poison because we like the taste), how freaked out would the aliens be to learn that there’s something we truly fear? I can see it going down like this:
Human Steve: Tell us about FTL travel and your culture, we have much to learn from each other
Alien: Yeah yeah in a minute tell me about the spider threat are we safe right now or

Even better would be if Human Steve is not one of those people who is afraid of spiders at all. Like, he has a pet tarantula and puts wild spiders outside safely when they come into his bathroom, if he bothers with them at all. And the aliens are VERY CONCERNED about the little guys and he’s like ???? They aren’t??? A threat????
But then they consult with Human Bill, and Human Bill is basically Professional Spider Hater and goes on for a weirdly long time about how spiders are the actual devil and how black widows are really dangerous and let’s not even MENTION Australia. He gets the heebee jeebies and starts twitching and itching as he begins to feel phantom bugs on his skin.
Both Human Steve and Human Bill insist that the other is the weird one.
The aliens are more concerned than ever.

We have learned to fly the air like birds and swim the sea like fish, but we have not learned the simple art of living together as brothers.
—  Martin Luther King, Jr.,Strength to Love, 1963
All of us as women have a friend, or a relative, or have gone through [some kind of abuse] ourselves. There are all of these playful sort of comments on Big Little Lies about women’s manipulation or women’s dirty secrets, but in fact the biggest little lie is how we carry shame about what men have done. We have to learn to use our voice to protect ourself and each other, because there is no shame in what another person has done to us, and it’s time to defend ourselves and demand to be treated with respect. That’s such a profound thought—I just felt privileged to be a part of that story.
—  Laura Dern