waze

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Sheriffs are campaigning to pressure Google Inc. to turn off a feature on its Waze traffic software that warns drivers when police are nearby. They say one of the technology industry’s most popular mobile apps could put officers’ lives in danger from would-be police killers who can find where their targets are parked.

Waze, which Google purchased for $966 million in 2013, is a combination of GPS navigation and social networking. Fifty million users in 200 countries turn to the free service for real-time traffic guidance and warnings about nearby congestion, car accidents, speed traps or traffic cameras, construction zones, potholes, stalled vehicles or unsafe weather conditions.

Waze users mark police presence on maps without much distinction other than “visible” or “hidden.” Users see a police icon, but it’s not immediately clear whether police are there for a speed trap, a sobriety check or a lunch break. The police generally are operating in public spaces.

http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Sheriffs-Want-Popular-Police-Tracking-App-Disabled-289755401.html

Popular Driving App Waze Might Have A Very Powerful New Enemy

According to the company, the purpose of the police reporting function is to remind drivers to behave safely when police are nearby as well as help people find a police officer if they are in trouble. And in the midst of a national debate over police accountability and mandatory body cameras, Waze’s police reporting function raises yet another question about the public’s access to police transparency.

Police officers in one major U.S. city are fighting back against Waze, a popular mobile app that reveals their locations to motorists.

Hundreds of officers in the Miami area have downloaded the app, which lets users provide real-time traffic information and identify areas where police are conducting speed enforcement. The local NBC affiliate says the officers are flooding Waze with false information on their activity in an attempt to make the app’s information less useful to drivers.

Disclosing the location of police officers “puts us at risk, puts the public at risk, because it’s going to cause more deadly encounters between law enforcement and suspects,” Sgt. Javier Ortiz, president of the Miami Fraternal Order of Police, tells the news outlet.

The National Sheriffs’ Association first raised concerns about the Waze app, which is used by millions of motorists. Not all police officers agree that it poses a threat, however. If a criminal wants to hurt an officer, they say, they don’t need an app to find a target. And high-visibility enforcement may ultimately reduce crime.

Sheriffs are campaigning to pressure Google Inc. to turn off a feature on its Waze traffic software that warns drivers when police are nearby. They say one of the technology industry’s most popular mobile apps could put officers’ lives in danger from would-be police killers who can find where their targets are parked.

Waze, which Google purchased for $966 million in 2013, is a combination of GPS navigation and social networking. Fifty million users in 200 countries turn to the free service for real-time traffic guidance and warnings about nearby congestion, car accidents, speed traps or traffic cameras, construction zones, potholes, stalled vehicles or unsafe weather conditions.

Sheriffs want to disable police tracking feature on Google Waze app

The popular traffic software program, which combines social networking and GPS functionality to offer up-to-date traffic conditions, also notifies drivers when there is a “visible” or “hidden” cop on the road ahead. Users report police presence through a police icon that tells drivers of an upcoming speed trap or sobriety stop – whether it’s hidden or visible.

While drivers like to avoid being stopped for speeding, police are nervous that the feature is an invitation to track and shoot officers, and they are petitioning to turn it off. Southern California Reserve Deputy Sheriff Sergio Kopelev and Bedford County, Virginia Sheriff Mike Brown told the Associated Press that "it is only a matter of time before the ‘police stalker’ is used to target law enforcement."

Ichabod Crane on Waze

So today I downloaded the Waze navigation app because you can set the voice to Ichabod Crane (yes, read by Tom Mison). I used it today for a trip to the cemetery (not for a funeral, but for ghost stories, because duh) which seemed appropriate. Some fun things about it:

  • He refers to your car to a carriage, which does get a bit silly.
  • He sounds absolutely fucking disgusted when he says the word “roundabout.” I live in the roundabout capital of America. My Crane was very pissed off.
  • Instead of saying “in one-tenth of a mile,” he says “in naught point one mile,” which I found the most charming thing about it.
  • If someone in the Waze app has reported that there are cops, he says: “Vigilance! Constables have been sighted ahead.”

Overall, the few phrases get tired pretty quickly. And the sound quality is bad, like Tom recorded it in a bathroom. But for one trip, it was kinda fun. 

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Cops actually ask Google to stop stalking them

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Aplikasi Waze Jadi Bagian dari Google Mobile Service

Aplikasi Waze Jadi Bagian dari Google Mobile Service

foto:makemac

Aplikasi navigasi Waze menjadi bagian dari Google Mobil Service dengan pilihan prainstalasi pada handset. Demikian kata juru bicara Waze, Julie Mossler, dalam siaran pers yang dirilis Jumat (6/3/2015).

Opsi ini memungkinkan pengguna menggunakan Waze langsung dari perangkat tanpa harus mengunjungi App store.

“Pengumuman yang menyatakan Waze sebagai Google Mobile Service adalah langkah…

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