way more interesting

Talking with writers online

Their stories: Amazing grammar, soaring vocabulary, beautiful imagery and prose which flows like a river.

In chats: no capitalisation or punctuation, swears like a sailor, misspellings everywhere, acronyms and abbreviations every five words, idek

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Dean Winchester | 13x02 The Rising Son

there’s a really important difference between “I love this villainous evil character because they make the story way more interesting but I recognise that they’re a terrible person who deserves to be dropkicked into the sun” and “I love this villainous evil character and I will defend them with my life they are a precious sinnamon roll here’s 10,000 words of meta about why their behaviour is justified here’s 8000 angsty headcanons about how they’re secretly insecure and probably abused here’s my dubious justification for why they deserve a completely unearned redemption arc even though they’ve shown zero remorse or desire to change at all yes I know they gleefully murdered a bunch of people but if you look really closely at this screenshot you’ll see their dad didn’t give them enough attention as a child so actually they’re the real victim here” 

how to let go of someone

1. realize they don’t care about you anymore. realize they don’t really care if you hold onto them or not. realize you’re not really all that important to them.

2. get sad. 

3. get angry.

4. become lonely. miss them dearly. remember how it felt to laugh with them. remember how it felt to make them smile. remember how you thought they’d always be in your life. remember how you felt they were all you needed. miss them dearly.

5. watch a new tv show from start to finish. try to find ways to make eggs more interesting. put too much cayenne pepper in your eggs. take a walk. find new people, laugh new laughs, discover new music. keep doing this for as long as it takes. shed off the skin you wore when you were with them. become something new, something they wouldn’t entirely recognize.

6. miss them dearly, during quiet summer nights where the air is too humid and you’re feeling particularly nostalgic.

7. get angry, for brief periods, wondering why they let you go so easily.

8. get angry, for brief periods, wondering why you let them go so easily.

9. live as normally as you can, for a long period of time.

10. run into them on the street, send them a random message, recieve a random message from them. talk for a bit, realize you don’t know them anymore. dig down desperately for the love you used to have for them. find nothing but pleasant apathy.

11. realize you don’t care about them anymore. realize you don’t really care if they had held onto you or not. realize they’re not really all that important to you. realize you’ve grown too far apart. realize you love who they were, what they gave to you before. realize that person who you love isn’t the person standing in front of you. realize you let them go, somewhere in all the in between, without even noticing. say goodbye to them, move on.

(12. wonder, sometimes, even still, if things could’ve been different, if you could’ve held on, if you still can, if it would make any difference. think these things, and then forget them.)

Whether you’re writing for a video game or a tabletop game, the secret to effective lore is cow tools.

Back in 1982, Gary Larson drew the following panel for the newspaper comic The Far Side:

According to Larson, it was simply meant to be a faintly surreal joke about how cows would be bad at making tools; it intends no deeper commentary. However, in the decades since, it’s become by far the comic’s most asked-about panel. People want to know why cows are making tools, what aspect of society it’s commenting on, and most critically, they want to know what the tools are for. The one on the right kind of resembles a carpenter’s saw, which leads folks to believe that the other three must have some obvious function too, if only they could puzzle it out.

But they don’t. They’re just random shapes, and the comic as a whole was never intended to actually mean anything.

I’ve become convinced that that’s the real secret to effective worldbuilding in gaming media. Certainly, the “core” of the setting should make sense, but all the peripheral stuff surrounding it? Just throw in a bunch of incomprehensible bullshit seasoned with the occasional bit that almost makes sense, and people will seize on those bits and ratonalise all the rest of it for you - and what they come up with is generally going to be way more interesting than whatever your original plan was, if indeed you had one at all.

Then, once they’ve figured it all out, just nod sagely, congratulate their cleverness, and keep your damn mouth shut.

The marauders obviously did some fucked up things to Snape, but can I remind everyone that canonically, James and Severus were rivals. Not just a bully and his victim, as far too many people seem to think.

I know I’ve talked about this before, but I’m really sick of seeing writers who should know better say things like, “Tragedy is more compelling than stories where characters have a nice day and nothing bad happens!” without understanding why.

Tragedy is an effective story element when it’s a deviation from the norm. A character’s peaceful existence is disrupted by a catastrophic event that throws everything into chaos. The character now has to either develop so they can cope with the new status quo, or find a way to put things back the way they were. There’s a good story in that.

But when a character’s life is an unrelenting cavalcade of misery, another heaping dose of shit isn’t all that interesting. At that point, a compelling deviation from the norm would be said character having a nice day where nothing bad happens. And modern fiction is chock-full of misery porn, so by this logic, it’s no wonder the coffee shop AU is such a popular fanfiction trope.

Derek Hale getting a dog and putting his life back together is way more interesting than Derek Hale’s life getting worse for the 26th consecutive episode. Creators like to hold up “everything is fine and nobody dies” as a sign that fanfic is bland and badly written, but if anything, it’s an indicator that mainstream fiction is bland and badly written. 

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favourite rory & logan moments: 22/?

Inevitable

An Alpha!Bucky One-Shot

Character Pairing: Alpha!Bucky Barnes x Omega!Reader

Word Count: 5,109 (oops!)

Warnings: NSFW 18+ EXPLICIT Smut! A/B/O Dynamics, fingering, sexual penetration, slight(?) impregnation kink, unprotected sex, a NSFW gif, some angst (blink and you miss it), language, dirty talk…

A/N: I make my own rules. 

 You smelt him before you saw him.

Your senses came alive when you saw him walk through the main entrance.

Alpha.

He exuded the title perfectly.

This isn’t the first time you had seen him at the museum but this was the closest you had ever gotten to him. He was at the ticket counter, smiling at Mandy as he presented his membership card. The leather jacket he had on moved like soft butter as he put the card in his wallet before it went back into the side pocket.  

Catching a whiff of his scent in the air, you wanted to melt to the floor. Sandalwood. It was earthy and it warmed your whole body.

You could make out his voice from where you were hiding in the gift shop. It was deep and raspy as he talked to Mandy. He took off his baseball hat and ran his fingers through his thick brown hair. He stuffed the hat into the back pocket of his jeans as he laughed at something Mandy had said.

Damn her. You were jealous.

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So I saw Guardians of the Galaxy 2

Lots of thoughts bouncing around. Some spoiler free thoughts:

  • Loved it. 
  • Gamora has a much more….consistent/fleshed out personality in this one? I love it.
  • That’s actually true of basically all the characters. Especially Drax and Gamora. 
  • Rocket steals the show. And other things he should not steal. 
  • Also Nebula. Nebula was WAY more interesting and dynamic. 
  • Really strong theme development and BEAUTIFUL color palette. DC, takes notes.
  • If I have one major complaint with the film, its that it has too many antagonistic forces, so the focus gets split. Lesson: Never more than 2 antagonists. Any more than 2 and things get dicey. 
  • Groot is so cute and the movie is very very aware of this. 
  • Mantis is very likable. 
  • Holy shit, 3 named female characters, each with their own minor character arc not directly tied to romance in the film? MARVEL STUDIOS, YOU SPOIL ME. 
  • Stay until the very very end of the credits. There’s like 5 stingers. 

anonymous asked:

Hey uh.. not to bother you by any means.. but can I get a link to those tips for drawing people crying you did once?? I looked through all the tags and couldn't find it myself, sorry..

Oh, it’s no bother! http://whatisthiscutenonsense.tumblr.com/post/147379834506/eruhamster-retroautomaton-some-crying-tips 

But honestly, I’m not actually too happy with those anymore. They’re pretty old. I still sort of hold the same value when I draw them, but here’s some more updated tips, if that’s alright. 

One of the biggest complaints I got with those tips was that just a single tear is good enough. Well yes and no. Tears are just a helpful tool, and of course not everyone cries the same, so yes, a single tear can be just as impactful, as long as your emotion and context carries the message. 

On the opposite end of the spectrum, there’s heavy crying. And this can take many forms. Again, the face has to carry the intensity of the emotion; the tears are just there to emphasize it. More intensity, (for some people) does tend to include more liquids and leaking. 

And of course none of it has to be perfect or even. As I love to touch on, crying is messy and ugly. It brings out the most strained emotions. So none of it has to be symmetrical to get the point across- if anything, it gives it more movement. 

I of course draw in a more cartoony fashion, so if you did want to go on the more realistic end of the spectrum, you can focus on the actual physics of tears and how they act and react on the face. More realistically, they come from the inner eye, and are much smaller. They tend to fall in wayward paths, slowly, but  sperraticly, and in droplets or thin streams. You can also add streak marks and flush up the face, depending on the subject. 

I’m glad you liked my old tips, and I hope these new ones help! 

15 things about Ishval that Brotherhood cut out

After rewatching Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood recently, I was once again extremely disappointed at the amount of content the anime cut out when it covered the Ishval war in episode 30. Volume 15 of the manga (which was entirely dedicated to showing the war in detail across four chapters) still remains my favourite volume of the whole series, so I wanted to talk about 15 things that Brotherhood cut out. Some of them are minor scenes and some are more major plot points.

The images I’ve included in this post have been taken directly from the Viz Media manga, as I really dislike the poor quality scanlations of FMA that are out there. I would highly recommend buying Volume 15 for yourself, even if it’s the only volume of FMA you ever own.

The things I’ll be covering are:

  1. Neighbouring country Aerugo’s role in the war
  2. The Ishvalans as people - their lives and strengths
  3. The Rockbells’ extra scenes
  4. The military’s order to kill the Rockbells
  5. Roy, Hughes, and Hawkeye’s extra scenes
  6. Hughes’ extended scenes as a squad captain
  7. Corruption of high-ranking officers and internal assassination
  8. Armstrong’s extra scene
  9. Torture & human experimentation of Ishvalans
  10. Doctor Marcoh & Doctor Knox’s extra scene
  11. Roy’s role as the Hero of Ishval
  12. Scar’s brother’s scenes
  13. Roy’s squad
  14. Children as the victims of the war
  15. The overall portrayal of the war, and how Volume 15 was written/illustrated

** VERY LONG POST UNDER THE CUT, VERY IMAGE HEAVY **

Let’s begin!

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Ok, so... this show is – without hyperbole – the single worst piece of Scooby-related media I’ve ever watched.

And this is coming from someone who analyzed every single episode of Scooby’s All-Star Laff-A-Lympics.

Alright, look. The New Scooby and Scrappy-Doo Show is… argh, how to put it….

Imagine watching a 10-minute condensed version of a Scooby-Doo episode, in which random things have been added and subtracted… all for zero reason.

Why, look! No Fred and Velma in this series! Why’s that?

no reason. They just… aren’t there.

What dynamics does it change within the group, and how does it affect the stories/shenanigans?

it doesn’t. Everything happens as usual, just… minus two people.

Subtract two characters, and add the canine embodiment of pandering and obnoxious non-importance. That’s the show.

Sorry, Scrappy, but… well, at least the story revolved around young Anakin. He’s got you beaten there, friend.

But forget the random character changes – it’s all miniscule in comparison to the rest of these bizarre, 10-minute fever dreams.

After great reflection, I can find no other way to describe the experience of the show besides this: 

Things just happen.

They went to an allegedly haunted house, and now there’s a face in the fireplace for one scene, because there is!

Now, they’re scared of the face in the fireplace!

Now, Scrappy says some words from his face hole!

Now, there’s a ghost playing the piano, because there is!

Now, they’re scared of the ghost playing the piano!

Now, there’s a floating rhinoceros head in the living room, because there is!

Now, they’re scared of the floating rhinoceros head!

Now, there’s a random living statue, because there is!

Now, Scrappy many words says talk hole from!

Now, there’s a skeleton all gussied up for sunday brunch while Shaggy looks like he’s flirting with it and OH SWEET GOODNESS MY BRAIN IS MELTING

…ok, this is making the show sound way more interesting than it actually is.

Because when you actually watch it, it’s an incoherent, unfocused, bizarrely-paced, unstructured, redundant jumble of things just happening.

Remember when you saw all those classic Scooby-Doo elements ‘n’ plot archetypes in the older shows?

Want to see those same things all over again, but crammed haphazardly into an incomprehensible fun-sized candy bar of visual and auditory suffering…

…while Scrappy-Doo slowly sucks out your soul?

Then this is the series for you.

it’s too late for me

save yourselves