water speaker

I have this blue hoody with a huge center pocket that, @tofu-pofu can attest, is viable to hold anything from aux cables to dancing water speakers to surgical gloves, to name a few. I could (and very well may) bring a 2 oz. bottle to school and just put it in my hoody pocket.

toomuchmeme  asked:

does report card have any close friends?? poor kiddo, i hope he does ;;

Heck yeah!! Report Card is CLOSE CLOSE friends with both M&M Bottle and Water Speaker. Everyone else is friendly to him, and they’re just pals (except for PB Cup, she’s mean as HECK to him)

Beach Day 🌴

@lightrfluid

After some texting, the girls had agreed to meet up at Dena’s and go to the beach nearby. They both figured that they’d earned a break.

Dena had put on her favorite bikini and thrown a t shirt and denim mini on. She figured flip flops would be fine, packed up her towel, a Bluetooth speaker, some water, and some assorted snacks.

Then, she went downstairs to wait for Sheena.

instagram

#waterspeaker I got for Christmas #anything #hedley

Made with Instagram

ok listen the big bang theory is a terrible show but there is one sequence that genuinely makes me laugh
the cornstarch and water on the bass speaker scene

flickr

014/365 - Hay House at Night by Darren Hester
Via Flickr:
Johnston-Felton-Hay House, often abbreviated Hay House, is a historic residence in Macon, Georgia. Built between 1855 and 1859 by William Butler Johnston and his wife Anne Tracy Johnston in the Italian Renaissance Revival style, the house has been called the “Palace of the South.” The mansion sits atop Coleman Hill on Georgia Avenue in downtown Macon, near the Walter F. George School of Law, part of Mercer University. The 18,000-square-foot, 24-room home designed by the New York architect T. Thomas and Son has four levels and is crowned by a three-story cupola. Commissioned by imaginative owners and constructed by the most skillful workers of the time, its technological amenities were unsurpassed in the mid-nineteenth century: hot and cold running water, central heat, a speaker-tube system connecting 15 rooms, a French lift equivalent to today’s elevator, in-house kitchen, and an elaborate ventilation system.

flickr

Johnston -Felton - Hay House by LT
Via Flickr:
Johnston-Felton-Hay House, often abbreviated Hay House, is a historic residence in Macon, Georgia. Built between 1855 and 1859 by William Butler Johnston and his wife Anne Tracy Johnston in the Italian Renaissance Revival style, the house has been called the “Palace of the South.” The mansion sits atop Coleman Hill on Georgia Avenue in downtown Macon, near the Walter F. George School of Law, part of Mercer University. The 18,000-square-foot (1,700 m2), 24-room home designed by the New York architect T. Thomas and Son has four levels and is crowned by a three-story cupola. Commissioned by imaginative owners and constructed by the most skillful workers of the time, its technological amenities were unsurpassed in the mid-nineteenth century: hot and cold running water, central heat, a speaker-tube system connecting 15 rooms, a French lift equivalent to today’s elevator, in-house kitchen, and an elaborate ventilation system. House history Two families lived in Hay House, the first over four generations. Most of the home’s present-day furnishings date from the Hay family’s occupancy (1926-1962). A few pieces are from the Johnston family (1860-1896), most notably the Eastlake-style dining room suite. The most notable piece in the collection may be the 1857 marble statue, “Ruth Gleaning,” by American expatriate sculptor Randolph Rogers. The home was a place of comfort for the Johnston family and their daughters until the late 1800s. In 1896 after the death of Mrs. Johnston, their daughter Mary Ellen Felton and her husband lived in the home. The Feltons updated the plumbing and electricity and stayed in the home until the time of their deaths in 1926. The Johnstons The Hay House living room William Butler Johnston obtained his substantial wealth through investments in banking, railroads and public utilities rather than from the agrarian cotton economy. In 1851, he married Anne Clark Tracy, 20 years his junior, and the couple embarked on an extended honeymoon in Europe from 1852 to 1855. During their trip, the Johnstons visited hundreds of museums, historic sites and art studios. They collected fine porcelains, sculptures and paintings as mementos during their grand tour. Inspired by the Italian architecture they observed, the Johnstons constructed the monumental Italian Renaissance Revival mansion in Macon upon their return to America.[1] Only two of the Johnstons’ six children survived to adulthood. Caroline and Mary Ellen Johnston were born in 1862 and 1864, respectively, and grew up in the house on Georgia Avenue. The Feltons After the death of Mrs. Johnston in 1896, daughter Mary Ellen and her husband, Judge William H. Felton, lived in the house. They remodeled and redecorated parts of the house, updated the plumbing and added electricity.[2] Their only child, William Hamilton Felton, Jr., was born in 1889. He married Luisa Macgill Gibson in 1915, and the newlywed couple soon moved in with the Feltons. They and their two sons, William Hamilton Felton III and George Gibson Felton, lived in the house until 1926. The Hays After the deaths of William Sr. and Mary Ellen Felton, the house was sold to Parks Lee Hay and his wife, Maude. After purchasing, the Hays redecorated the entire home, updating it to fit the new twentieth-century décor. The home was seen as a local landmark to all in middle Georgia. Mr. Hay died in 1957; when Mrs. Hay died in 1962, the home was turned into a house museum. In 1977, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation took over ownership of the home and it is now a National Historic Landmark. [3] Present day Following Mrs. Hay’s death, her heirs established the P.L. Hay Foundation and operated the house as a private house museum. By virtue of its national significance, Hay House was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1974. In 1977, the ownership and operation of the house was formally transferred to The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation to ensure its long-term preservation. In 2000, the White House Millennium Council designated Hay House an Official Project of Save America’s Treasures in 2000.[5] Today, Hay House is one of Macon’s most popular tourist attractions with 20,000 visitors each year.[5] The House is also a prominent rental venue for special events.