water image

The Effect of Music, Prayer & Words on Water by Dr. Masaru Emoto:

Keeping in mind our bodies are 65% water.
You are what you tell yourself you are.
You are what you tell others they are.
Thoughts truly become things… choose good ones!

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In their newest video, the Slow Mo Guys recreated one of my favorite effects: vibration-driven droplet ejection. For this, they use a Chinese spouting bowl, which has handles that the player rubs after partially filling the bowl with water. By rubbing, a user excites a vibrational mode in the bowl. Watch the GIFs above and you can actually see the bowl deforming steadily back and forth. This is the fundamental mode, and it’s the same kind of vibration you’d get from, say, ringing a bell. 

Without a high-speed camera, the bowl’s vibration is pretty hard to see, but it’s readily apparent from the water’s behavior in the bowl. In the video, Gav and Dan comment that the ripples (actually Faraday waves) on the water always start from the same four spots. That’s a direct result of the bowl’s movement; we see the waves starting from the points where the bowl is moving the most, the antinodes. In theory, at least, you could see different generation points if you manage to excite one of the bowl’s higher harmonics. The best part, of course, is that, once the vibration has reached a high enough amplitude, the droplets spontaneously start jumping from the water surface! (Video and image credits: The Slow Mo Guys; submitted by effyeah-artandfilm)

Fishing: digital painting walkthrough

So I got a question on anon asking me about my drawing coloring process, and unfortunately I accidentally deleted it, because I have clumsy fingers on mobile.

Thank you so much for your interest, I’m really honored! I will try and give a brief overview of my drawing process, and hope this is helpful or useful to you! I just started experimenting with Photoshop last summer around July, so I’m definitely not the most experienced, I’m still learning a lot!

I’m going to be using this drawing of Lapis, because it’s one of my favorite pieces and it is more detailed than my average drawing: 

This drawing was inspired by the episode “Alone At Sea”, where I wanted to illustrate this concept: 

This was my main reference, but I also throughout, used a lot of google images of water and colorful fish. 

Sketch: My canvas size was 3000 px wide and 2000 px high. I tend to sketch with the standard brushes and I actually have like 2 layers of sketches (one for basic shapes/sizes of things, then one for rough details and things). 

Lineart + base coloring: I add lineart, usually px size 6-8, with the pencil brush. I then add base colors, using the default solid brush. Usually they are the generic color I’m going for. I try not to get too stressed about the base colors because I usually cover most of them up.

Primary highlights/light sources: It gets more interesting once you establish primary light sources, so where the main light source is coming from, as well as reflections of things. I use a larger brush and add these on new layers, set to either overlay or screen or pin light. So I wanted light to be shining through the water, making the color reflect on Lapis, which is how it works with real light. 

Detail/color: I think this is the most fun part, where you choose colors to paint over. I think I painted this the way I normally use watercolor, which is combining a lot of complimentary and contrasting colors with varying amounts of saturation. It’s more complicated to explain that, but it’s a lot of eyeballing. For example, referring to the reddish colors, I tried spreading them around the drawing instead of having them just in one place. The reddish fish reflects around the water bubble, and the light is reflected on Lapis’s clothing as well. 

Highlights: This makes your drawing really stand out - often at this stage, many layers are on ‘luminosity’, ‘screen’ or ‘overlay’. I also do this with the lineart layer as well, so there are not just harsh black lines, which can be distracting. There are also secondary light sources, such as at the back of Lapis’s head, because I felt like there was still not enough red-orange in the drawing. 

Small white lines also make a big difference (such as those on the bubble, and on the edges of her jacket/in her hair). 

I later went and adjusted the color balance a bit, as well as increased the contrast so some more areas would appear darker and it was a bit less green in color. 


That is kind of the overview! I hope this was helpful at all, or at least interesting! If you have any more questions I would be happy to answer, I enjoy rambling. Sorry if this was a bit long!

Thank you so much for taking an interest!