watch the details

anonymous asked:

"Jameel watches anime" Hi I Need Details

asdgfsfd 

so he was mainly exposed to stuff like Naruto, DBZ, and Yu-Gi-Oh so he’s really into those (he’s gay for Kaiba)–we don’t get too much other anime on TV in India–but he started streaming for stuff after a while and so he also really enjoys stuff like Blue Exorcist and also was really invested in Madoka for a while ??? (he ‘s . so embarrassi n g ) 

and he also has a soft spot for doraemon ;;;; he has a doraemon plush somewhere in his room that he keeps hidden

anonymous asked:

As a person who has never seen Gilmore Girls would you please explain it to me and should I watch it?

It really details this mother daughter relationship. It features lorelai and rory gilmore. Lorelai came from a rich socialite background and got pregnant at 16. Refusing to marry rory’s father she runs away at 17 and raises rory. The story picks up when rory is 16 and goes through her college career. The story details their lives.
I personally love it because its a series i watched with my mother and we still watch it now. Its on netflix 😉

youtu.be
Mischief Managed | Harry Potter Fan Film
Before the Order. Before the prophecy. Before Harry. Remember to watch in HD! Moony, Wormtail, Padfoot and Prongs are proud to present (and star in)... MISCH...

A new Marauders fan film has just come out, and let me tell you IT’S AMAZING!!!
I’ve never seen anything that feels so authentic and REAL, and the amount of effort and care put into this astounds me! This is such a lovely piece of fan work, spread the word and support everyone who made a Harry Potter film we’ve always wanted! ❤

Listen

Song is Itsumo Nando Demo music box, original from Spirited Away

8

get to know me meme; 20/20 animated movies: howl’s moving castle (2004)
“You who swallowed a falling star, oh heartless man, your heart shall soon belong to me.”

How People Watching Improves Your Writing

Sensory detail. 

When I was fourteen or fifteen, I liked to draw. I’d look up internet tutorials on how to draw the human figure, and nearly all of them suggested going outside and sketching anyone who goes by. Not only was this relaxing, but I noticed my art style become more realistic over time. I think we can apply similar concepts as writers to improve sensory description. 

How to practice: Try writing down specific details about the people you see. How is their walking gait? What does their voice sound like? What quirks about them stand out as you observe them? Write down descriptions using all of the senses (except maybe taste) and, over time, you’ll notice your words become more lively.

Observation.

You don’t have to be Sherlock Holmes to benefit from observation skills. Writing stories is all about noticing connections and seeing the extraordinary in ordinary life. People watching can boost your ability to notice little details and recognize them as important, and it can help you sense patterns more easily.

How to practice: In this case, remember once again that you are not Sherlock Holmes. Don’t assume that you know a person’s life story based on what socks they’re wearing (and definitely don’t try making such assumptions with friends or family). 

Try to take in people who pass by and the small, unique details about them. Notice how they’re interacting with other people and the world around them. Think about why that might be and write down any thoughts or connections that interest you.

Freewriting. 

Writing first drafts can paralyze anyone. We all know that getting the words out is the first, most important step, but that can feel like torture sometimes. If you’re a hesitant writer, freewriting can help you feel less self-conscious when writing and jot down thoughts or impressions as they come. Other exercises can help you with editing later on, but you can’t get there unless you freewrite.

How to practice: Write down anything that strikes you without worrying whether it’s important or you’ll use it later. I like to focus on one person per minute and during that time, write anything that I find interesting. Once the sixty seconds are up, I move onto another person and continue that cycle as long as I want to keep going. With time, you’ll get faster and may notice that words come more easily.

Creativity. 

In the book Stargirl, one of my favorite parts is when Stargirl and Leo go to the park and play a game where they make up stories about the strangers they pass. As they connect together little observations, they create vivid backstories that may not necessarily be true, but that’s not the point. What matters is stretching their minds.

How to practice: Play this game for yourself. Pick a person at random and, piecing together little details you notice about them, give them a backstory. What are they doing, and where are they going (both right now and in the long-term)? Why are they hurrying so quickly to wherever they’re going or walking almost aimlessly along? Don’t worry about getting it “right” so much as creating an interesting story for this person.

Empathy. 

Developing empathy as a writer is so important, though not often talked about. If you can put yourself in the shoes of another person and consider what complexities, challenges, and little joys life holds for them, you will create emotionally powerful pieces. People watching helps train your eye to notice those around you more and remember that yours is not the only voice in the world.

How to practice: Remember the definition of the word “sonder:” the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own. Look for those complexities. Notice relationships. Notice facial expressions and emotions. Don’t just look at them but see them, and write down what strikes you about them.

Character Strengths and Related Flaws

So, we all know the drill. When you’re creating a character, you want them to be balanced. Your character should have both strengths and flaws. You’re not making a perfect person, nor are you making a complete monster.

However, sometimes you can find yourself just going for a random assemblage of flaws, as if picking them out of a hat. That’s one way to go about it, but I think the much better way is to look at the strengths you’ve given your character, and see what flaws may correspond to them, what characteristics are often found together. For example:

Adaptable

  • Definition: able to adjust to new conditions
  • Flaws: overly compliant, blindly obedient

Adventurous

  • Definition: willing to take risks or to try out new methods, ideas, or experiences
  • Flaws: rash, foolhardy, takes unnecessary risks

Keep reading

youtube

and on june 22nd express live. we created some steps to beat the bots and screw the scalpers. watch the video for details.

8

When Flint and I are of the same mind, there’s no obstacle yet encountered that we cannot surmount. I don’t know why that is, he doesn’t know why it is. But it is.

*I call this one ‘Flint and Silver being stupidly perceptive about each other’s fears and insecurities’.