8

I fight like a girl. I fight like a girl who refuses to be a victim. I fight like a girl who’s tired of being ignored, humored, beaten or raped. I fight like a girl who’s sick of not being taken seriously. I fight like a girl who’s been pushed too far. I fight like a girl who offers and demands respect. I fight like a girl who has a lifetime of anger, strength, and pride pent up in her girly body. I fight like a girl who fights back. (insp.)

5

Today the Department of Phenomenal Papercraft delves into the world of entomological artwork. Paper wasps gather fibers from dead wood and plant stems and mix them with their saliva to create a gray or brown papery material which they use to construct their water-resistant nests. When Italian biological science student Mattia Menchetti provided a captive colony of European paper wasps with colored paper, the insects created awesomely colorful nests.

“He started by feeding his captive wasps yellow paper, and then gradually began introducing more shades. The insects soon created a technicolor home for their larvae. In addition to making for some unusual eye candy, the nest is sturdy as well. A protein in the saliva of European paper wasps is so effective in making their nests waterproof that it’s been used by scientists for a biodegradable drone.”

Visit Mattia Menchetti’s website to check out more of his research projects.

[via mental_floss]

Shirley Slade, WWII WASP pilot of B-26 and B-39.

In 1942, the United States was faced with a severe shortage of pilots, so an experimental program to replace males with female pilots was created. The group of female pilots was called the Women Airforce Service Pilots — WASP for short. Shirley Slade was one of about 1,100 chosen. She was trained to fly the B-26 and B-39, and that got her put on the cover of Life magazine in 1943 at about 23 years old.