wardrobe-project

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So I’ve long said I’d revive this project, and I finally got off my butt to do so.

New pictures and new style will be posted soon, for now have old shots from when I lived in Japan! Click for captions.

Wardrobe Project was both an exercise in self-esteem, as well as a handy way of cataloging neat outfit ideas when they came to me (I have a terrible memory and a far-too-large closet). I could use it again!

AMY’S RADICAL CLOSET REFASHION, PART V

With last week’s mending completed, I’m now looking forward to the next stage of my wardrobe project: continuing with the count.

I’ve already counted my underwear and hosiery - that was an easy first step. But I think to tackle my (*whispers*) three wardrobes, with all different types of clothing jumbled up, I’m going to just have to go for it, and count and sort and evaluate in one big splurge. I haven’t had a big sort out for years, so I’m expecting to find lots of stuff that I don’t wear any more - or perhaps have never worn. In deciding what to do with them, I’m sure that I’ll be thinking of the ideas about unworn clothes that I discussed in my PhD thesis. 

 It is quite common for people to view unworn clothes purely as a waste of money. I don’t like that approach! I feel that it is simplistic and feeds a view of women being ʻdupedʼ by fashion. Instead, I am interested in the more positive idea that unworn clothes have an important part to play in helping us to construct our identities – who we feel we are. Maura Banim and Ali Guy, in a fantastic chapter in a book called “Through the Wardrobe”, explain that the pieces we keep but don’t wear can ʻhelp provide continuity or discontinuity with womenʼs current identities’ because they ʻallow women to maintain a connection with former, important aspects of themselves and their livesʼ. That notion certainly resonates with me - I know that I have garments I keep because they remind me of who I am and who I have been in the past.

When I talked to women about their wardrobes as part of my research, there was lots of chat about keeping unworn clothes just in case; there was an implicit expectation of future use. In some cases, they had particular circumstances in mind, such as the hope that their body shape might change in the future. Items were also kept just in case of changing fashions, and of the wearer changing their style or becoming more adventurous. On one hand, this attitude can be seen as legitimising hoarding –keeping items in case of circumstances which are unlikely to arise. However, I like to think of the wardrobe as a source of resilience –a way of dealing with the ever-changing context of fashion. 

I’m excited to find out how many clothes I have, and how many of them haven’t been worn for ages: a lot, I think! I’m glad to have the opportunity to sort them out with my eyes open, allowing me to think consciously about what I want to keep, and what I want to wear, and why –and which pieces I’m happy to release back into the world via the charity shop (thrift store). Having developed lots of ideas for reworking garments as part of my research, I’m expecting to be adding a lot to my mending/altering pile –though I’ll have to be careful the pieces don’t fester in there for years, as others have. In fact: that’s yet another pile of clothes I must remember to count and sort out!

- Amy Twigger Holroyd 

One-woman British fashion disruption engine Amy Twigger Holroyd is completing her PhD on folk fashion, while conducting stitch-hacking workshops, developing the practise and philosophy of reknitting, and producing fantastically restructured garments under her label Keep & Share. Read (and shop) more here

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Dress: gift, Cardigan: gift, Shoes: Payless

I had to go to the temple the other day which meant I had to dress nice. I didn’t have a lot of time to take pictures so sorry for the blurry pictures and messy room. I love wearing this dress. It’s just a nice dress. For some reason I always get complimented when I wear it.

I also just threw on the cardigan. I didn’t think it would work but it did. And it was perfect for the temperature outside. It was also a good hair day but it got wet and ruined. Sad. :(

Oh, I finally got through my clothes, it’s fun, because one of my friends came to my place, she picked so many clothes for herself, that we laughed she looked, like she would rob some stores! ^^ But thanks to that? She got tones of new clothes for herself, I got some money, my wardrobe is maybe ‘poor’ now, but at least fulflled with things I really need, or look good in - since I lost so much weight over the year, that it’s pointless to keep all the oversized clothes, while someone else can enjoy them to the fullest (90% were like new ^^). Rest of the clothes we packed and brought to the container, where you can leave clothes for people in need - I hope so more people could enjoy the clothes this way! xD And now I can go to mall and get some fitted long sleeves shirts (I really need white one for sure), and maybe some sweater? I saw really great things in Stradivarius & House, so yeah, Plaza be ready for me tomorrow! :)

          Bom, aqui vai a primeira postagem sobre o #Wardrobe project. É o seguinte, este é o meu ármario e estou fazendo algumas alterações nele. Tudo o que crio e o que penso que seja criativo de desenhar nele, eu faço. Os desenhos já estão em um período avançado, já terminei uma face de uma porta, mas mesmo assim, ainda falta muito trabalho a ser feito.

         Os desenhos são feitos á mão livre, primeiramente, um esboço com lapís e depois á caneta permanente, ou marcador para retroprojetor, de ponta porosa, 1mm. 

         Espero que apreciem e que mandem também ideias para futuros desenhos, aqui. 

“Para fazer uma obra de arte não basta ter talento, não basta ter força, é preciso também viver um grande amor.”

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

AMY’S RADICAL CLOSET REFASHION PART IX At last, I’m ready to unveil the HARD FACTS of my recent wardrobe inventory. First, let’s have a quick recap of why on earth I decided to count my clothes anyway. It all started with my PhD research into homemade clothes, which involved me looking at the number of items we own, and why we keep garments we don’t wear.  As I wrote in my second post  “Research for a recent report by British recycling organisation WRAP called Valuing Our Clothes found that the average number of clothing items owned by adults in the UK (including underwear) is 115. Meanwhile, social anthropologist Sophie Woodward, in her excellent book Why Women Wear What They Wear, inventoried the wardrobes of 27 women. She counted a total number of items (not including underwear, this time) ranging from just 35 to a whopping 182, and the average total was 98 items…” Having found these figures, I was keen to make an inventory of my own heaving wardrobe. I was pretty sure I’d beat that maximum of 182 items.  So, over Christmas, I bit the bullet and counted the contents of my wardrobe. With a house move imminent, I took the opportunity to also have a good sort out –so here are both ‘before’ and ‘after’ figures! Without further ado: KNITWEAR (cardigans, jumpers, fine knits) 59 >>> 49 TOPS (t-shirts, vests, sweatshirts, blouses and other tops) 189 >>> 120 BOTTOMS (trousers, skirts, shorts) 37 >>> 21 DRESSES 45 >>> 44 UNDERWEAR (including hosiery) 159 >>> 153 HOMEWEAR (and sportswear) 35 >>> 28 COATS & JACKETS 31 >>> 28 In the interests of full disclosure, I’ll mention that I also counted my shoes (52 >>> 35); that I haven’t yet considered accessories – scarves and such; and that, in the move, I discovered yet another bag of tights that I haven’t dared open! So - that gives a grand total (including underwear) of: 607 ITEMS >>> 465 ITEMS  Even after the sort out, that’s an impressive four times the WRAP figure of 115 items. (However, I’m a bit dubious about that figure, as it’s based on asking people to estimate their wardrobe - a tricky task!) If we strip out underwear, my post-sort-out total is still 312 items – way above that maximum figure of 182.  Whichever way you split it, I think it’s fair to say, I have a lot of clothes. This is pretty much down to hoarding, rather than rampant purchasing– I reckon I acquire a new item once every month or so nowadays. I do like to hold on to things, though I found the sort-out - which resulted in a total reduction of 25% - rather cathartic! And I think I can go further – having started to look critically at what I have, and what I wear, I think there’s more to do. Interestingly, standing back and looking at what I have has also highlighted the gaps (yes, incredibly there are some) - spaces where having just the right item would help me to wear more of what I already have. More on that in the next installment… 

                                                                                        - Amy Twigger Holroyd

One-woman British fashion disruption engine Amy Twigger Holroyd is completing her PhD on folk fashion, while conducting stitch-hacking workshops, developing the practise and philosophy of reknitting, and producing fantastically restructured garments under her label Keep & Share. Read (and shop) more here
4

Top: JCPenny, Cardigan: second-hand, Pants: gift, Shoes: sister’s

It was a beautiful day on Saturday so I proceeded to take pictures outside. I was feeling very primary today. Not sure I’d wear this again, but it just goes to show that I’m okay with experimenting since I always wear these pants one way.

You know, I guess it’s time to take a deep breath and clean a bit my wardrobe and cabinets, put all my clothes on the carpet and then check each of them and decide, what I’m going to do: leave it, pack it for people in need, give it away to my friend, who’s bigger size, than I do actually, I mean where’s the point to keep clothes I don’t wear and won’t anymore, when someone else can enjoy them, wear them and be happy about that, right? So keep your fingers crossed for me, because it’s going to be long, rainy, ‘project runaway’ day for me, when I’m going to be back with Danno from our usual walk xD

WWII WAC Uniform
This entry is part 12 of 20 in the series Carondelet Historical Society Project

Back in 2011, I got to borrow this World War II Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC and later WAC) uniform with matching garrison cap from a local historical society.

This was my first shoot for the Carondelet Historical Society, and the first picture from this first shoot is my favorite. Anita had never modeled before, and was introduced to me via an online guy friend in Arkansas. How awesome is that?

Some of these pictures I edited with a Kodachrome effect. Others are as they came out of my camera and totally untouched. I could retouch her skin and remove blemishes, but I believe these add to the artistic quality of this series.

A little bit of history about this version of the WAC uniform that I found online:

Due to harsh criticism of unsatisfactory fitting and material of the first WAAC uniforms many revisions had to be made. 
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A new jacket was developed, with a better-fitting prolonged upper collar. The bulky breast pockets that caused unwanted fullness of the bust were replaced by simulated pockets with buttoned flaps. 
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Because of the prolonged collar other parts of the jacket automatically were set lower: the breast pockets, the button closure and the slit pockets. The whole jacket was a little bit longer now as well. Unfortunately, the bottom button was set too low so that one had to unbutton the jacket for comfortable sitting.
Another problem was that the new jackets were tailored by men’s garment contractors and therefore became too stiff and appeared awkward. 
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The skirt pattern was also revised. The previous straightcut of the gores caused wrinkling and rolling of the skirt. Therefore the new skrirt was rounded at the hips to fit better to the actual female figure.

This WAC uniform was almost in new condition and still had ironing seams! The army dress shirt may or may not have gone with it, because it was disproportionately huge.

 

#gallery-1 { margin: auto; } #gallery-1 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-1 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-1 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */
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Below are some of my original edits. It’s interesting to see what I thought was awesome back in 2011 and what I think is awesome now, and my changes in editing vision:

#gallery-2 { margin: auto; } #gallery-2 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 33%; } #gallery-2 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-2 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */
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WWII WAC Uniform was originally published on VintageReveries - Vintage Fashion and Ephemera Blog

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Dress: H&M, Blouse: hand-me-down, Tights: anywhere, Shoes: Famous Footwear, Purse: hand-me-down

This was my Valentines outfit. I wore it to a Single Awareness Day party that night and had to rush to take photos. I’ve been working on fixing up this outfit for a while now. The dress had straps that broke and wires that were messed up, but I fixed it in time.

I may have been single on Valentines Day but I decided to treat myself. Why not? I was my own Valentine this year.

What Can a Fitted Wardrobe Shop Bring to Your Renovation or Development Mission?

If you are renovating or developing your home or single other property, whether you plan to physical invasive the very thing or lease-back inner man out, the design of all of the storage spaces can stand quite an important thing to think random. When inner self comes to wardrobes, this is because me is often improve on to go considering a fitted closet option which makes best use pertinent to the unemployable space in the bedrooms, and these need to be found planned as an example part re the basic design about the property rather than thought along toward later when myself comes up to other trousseau.

Working-out with a good fitted wardrobe company is the greatest way to compass about you invent good quality wardrobes that are properly built and installed for your property, as well as fitting with the primitive art and style you are aiming for in your bedrooms. A fitted wardrobe company will know how as far as make best use of the shape of your rooms to lend the largest large amount of storage space contemporary the wardrobes without taking up by what mode much usable living light-year as standing wardrobes tend into. This can exist especially valuable favorable regard small properties like apartments, or in smaller second, guest or children’s bedrooms, where inner man may not necessarily have a lot of room bit restraint love to as much storage correspondingly possible.
A fitted wardrobe company may also go on able upon do bespoke designs, rather precluding sizing one of their standard harness designs to your space, which can be good if you are going for a particular style that isn’t easy over against find readymade composing stick to beads, or you simply want great man completely unique for your rest home.

Whatever the size regarding your project, whether you need wardrobes just as one room or for all the rooms in a solid block of flats you’ve bought, or even a hotel, a good fitted wardrobe gossip will make sure alterum get what you would fain do and a good horizontal axis of workmanship and care. Looking online longing help yourselves find a appropriate wardrobe company on speaking terms your area who will abide able to offer the design or carpentry services you need for your fitted wardrobes, and ethical self can also nurse the name accruement to see what other customers are byword within call ethical self. If you have a large project you may need to bring to light a company adjusted favor working on larger scale developments citron renovations fore yourselves begin, as obviously this will require a eye-witness cut of manpower a smaller firm may not have capacity from.

Marie McCain (New Brunswick) from the IAmMatthewian Project (IAMP, now known as Project Canada) dressed up in different outfits!

Top row:

  • Sailor - New Brunswick’s love of sailing shows through this outfit.
  • Child Formal - She looks a little like Alice from Alice in Wonderland in this one.
  • Swimsuit (created by @lafranglophone) - If she wants to go in the water rather than sail on it.
  • Belle de Mer (created by Misharoyuki) - New Brunswick’s spirit of the sea.
  • 1860s Period Dress (created by @berrymarais) - She wore in the Confederation in suitably period style.
  • Gymwear - Where do you think she gets all that strength to chop down trees and swing axes from?

Bottom row:

  • Mermaid - Inspired by a picture of ghost Nova Scotia and mermaid New Brunswick on the old IAMP forums, although I can’t remember who drew it. Maybe @rhinocio, as she’s from Nova Scotia?
  • Adult Formal - I created this outfit when I was making a Sim version of New Brunswick in The Sims 3 to wear on formal occasions.
  • Navy Captain (created by @portabellogna) - When New Brunswick wants to save the world at sea.
  • Winter - To keep herself protected from the biting cold and go ice-skating with Nova Scotia.
  • Provincial Flag Dress - For showing off her homeland via fashion.
  • Normal - Just as @ctcsherry made her out to be.

New Brunswick and IAMP/PC © @ctcsherry

AMY’S RADICAL CLOSET REFASHION PART X In my last post I finally shared the results of my wardrobe inventory.  I’ve been having another type of wardrobe clear-out this week: launching a Keep & Share sale to help me clear the cupboards of my ready to wear collection as I shift to becoming a commission-only label, remaking styles from my archive.  But, returning to my own wardrobe, new clothing-related questions are now popping into my head. The one I’d like to focus on this time is: just how long do we keep our clothes? As I’ve mentioned in my previous posts, there isn’t a whole lot of research on the contents of our wardrobes– and information about the length of time we keep things is particularly scant.  While I have a lot of clothes, I don’t add to my wardrobe very often these days. This is partly because I love many of the things I already have - I know that any new item would have stiff competition. It’s also based on a conscious decision to adopt a slow approach to fashion - informed by my own design philosophy and linked quite specifically to an article I read whilst studying for my MA over ten years ago. The article was in View on Colour, a trend prediction journal, and it argued for a move towards slowness and satisfaction. Here are some excerpts that I found particularly inspiring at the time: “Pollution, over-production, and the possible scarcity of raw materials became a general concern some twenty years ago. The main answer has been recycling … but recycling still demands energy and produces waste. The more definitive solution is to keep…” “We want to invest. Buying for now and for the future, designing our own sustainable style as years go by…” “Putting together a wardrobe and a home will become a life-long process and something of a quest…” “You will not be searching for the perfect object but the perfect object for you. Putting together this alphabet of basic and loyal items will spell out who you are…”

 

These words - particularly the line about a life-long quest - have stayed with me, more than any other book or article about sustainable fashion. I do feel like I have been searching for the perfect ‘Amy pieces’ - and when I find them, I want to hang on to them and keep wearing them for a long, long time. Flicking through my wardrobe this morning, I tried to figure out the average length of time I’ve owned the contents. It’s hard, because of course, the answer varies - there are recently-acquired items sitting alongside pieces I’ve had for many years. And while I’ve got lots of secondhand/vintage clothes, which might be decades old, I’m interested (right now) in how long they’ve been in my wardrobe, rather than how long it is since they were made.  I reckon I’ve acquired the majority of pieces in the last ten years, and I’d estimate the average at 5-6 years. As I browsed the rails of my wardrobe, a few older items stood out and so I took them out into the garden for an impromptu washing-line-based photo shoot…
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The longest-standing pieces are a number of shirts and Indian tops that I’ve had since I was in my early teens (think grunge era). I wore them a lot then, and then didn’t wear them for a long time… but they’ve recently come out of hibernation and feel both emotionally significant and totally right for now, so I’m very glad I kept them. Then there are a few pieces - t-shirts and a sweatshirt - that were handed down to me by family and friends, and so have a longer ‘known life’ (if we include the time worn by the previous owner). The stand-out item here is a well-worn Bob Marley tour t-shirt bought by my parents in 1976. I love to wear it, but keep it for special occasions as it is so delicate, beautifully disintegrating into a constellation of holes. 
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I had a quick look at my shoes, and realised that the older pairs tend to be ‘posh’ heels - I wear them so seldom that they don’t have chance to wear out! The oldest ones still knocking about are a pair of Red or Dead patterned slingbacks - which I loved so much, I bought two pairs. Man, I love those shoes - though I’m not sure I’m ready for that 90s heel again, quite yet.
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And finally - here I am (above), wearing what I think is the longest-standing item I have worn continuously, without a break, since acquiring it over fifteen years ago–a Belle & Sebastian band t-shirt). I’ve paired it with what I think is the oldest-in-actual-age item in my wardrobe –a lovely handmade black jacket– and my most frequently worn garment, my black Old Town trousers.  What is YOUR oldest garment friend? I’d love to know. 

  - Amy Twigger Holroyd

One-woman British fashion disruption engine Amy Twigger Holroyd is completing her PhD on folk fashion, while conducting stitch-hacking workshops, developing the practise and philosophy of reknitting, and producing fantastically restructured garments under her label Keep & Share. Read (and shop) more here
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Top: Gift, Pants: Maurices, Shoes: Payless

I haven’t done this in a bit due to laziness but here goes! I haven’t worn this top in a long time so I pulled it out and tried it on today. I also don’t often keep my hair down since it’s a pain in the butt, but today’s been a good day. Just something nice to wear around the house as I clean and enjoy living on my own. :)

The life changing magic of tidying up

I’ve started reading this and I’m already super down. In a total sucker for organization and minimalism, although you’d have a hard time guessing as much if you came to my home or looked in my closet. (I’m also a total sucker for comics, toys, books, games, felts, and hobbyist electronics. No *you* have too many hobbies.)

This book divided tidying into two steps:

1.) discarding items that are no longer useful or don’t bring you joy
and
2.) deciding where to keep things

I really like the idea of purging through all the clutter in my home. There’s a lot of stuff in here I *know* I don’t use and definitely doesn’t bring me any joy and I want it gone so I no longer have to clean or deal with it.

I’m fighting through my wardrobe today. I want to start a capsule wardrobe, but that will be a secondary step to the purging I’m going to lay down on this place. I’ll let you know how it goes.

Wish me luck. This isn’t going to be easy on my back.

Busy morning in the workshop.

Chris is just finishing painting up a cup that fits around a boiler with some integrated storage. Made to match a similar cupboard nearby.

Whilst on the other workbench we are just beginning to workout the layout for an oak and birch plywood kids wardrobe. An exciting little project.

Stay tuned for more photos!