war rugs

concept: tragic raw-voiced elven folk singer with little round sixties glasses and burgeoning heroin problem.

concept: honestly anything late 60s/early 70s + fantasy races just let me have my rugged vietnam war vet halfings and beatnik dwarrows 

it’s been months, by the dead of June the rest have all been forgotten. Lurking through the woods, 29 NHL teams watch the Penguins, waiting. No one’s seen teams like the Canadiens, the Bruins, The Canucks, since April. In their absence flowers grew, the trees got their leaves back, the Stanley Cup was awarded. 

On top of the mountain, The Pens have all the attention. The sun is shining right down on them, and all of their championship glory.

And then, a rumble.

Noise from the forests below, it’s not just about the pens anymore. Patrice Bergeron emerges, war-torn and rugged, making his way up the mountain, a determined look on his face and a bow in his hand. But no time to be alarmed by him, PK Subban and Brent Burns, carrying makeshift swords exit the forest from the opposite direction, making their own way up the mountain. Conor McDavid peers through the branches before waving on Ghostisbehere. 

“What is this?” Matt Murray asks, stepping forward and looking out as more and more NHL players make their way up the mountains. 

“They’re here.” Sidney Crosby says, unsheathing his own sword, “the NHL awards, they’re coming, it’s not about us anymore.”

There’s a shrill cry. Conor Sheary has spotted Patrice Bergeron.

“Omg,” he whispers to Kuhnhackl “I love him.”

The war rug tradition of Afghanistan has its origins in the decade of Soviet occupation of Afghanistan from 1979, and has continued through subsequent military, political and social conflicts. Afghan rug-makers began incorporating the apparatus of war into their designs almost immediately after the Soviet Union invaded their country. They continue to do so today in the wake of the United States’ 2001invasion of Afghanistan which ousted the Taliban government of Mullah Omar but has failed to bring an end to violence in the country. The rugs produced in response to these events are among the world’s richest traditions of war art of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

The terms Baluch and war rug are generalisations given to the genre by rug dealers, commercial galleries, collectors, critics and commentators. The distinctive characteristic of these rugs is their capacity to convey their makers’ experiences and interpretations of the circumstances and politics of war and conflict in the region.

Little is known about the circumstances of war rugs’ production and distribution, or their makers’ intentions.