war protests

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23 photos from Trump’s first 100 days show the true power of the Resistance

  • The day of President Donald Trump’s inauguration wasn’t just the beginning of an unprecedented presidency. It was the launch of one of the most sustained protest movements in American history.
  • Over the past 100 days, immigrant communities showed the force of their protest, anti-fascists have lashed out violently at the rising tide of white supremacy and anti-war coalitions long dead have come to life with renewed interest and energy.
  • Here is a concise look back at some of the most significant marches, disruptions and protests that pushed back against Trump’s agenda at every opportunity. Read more. (4/29/17, 10:55AM)
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19th of April.

I’m no longer currently living in Venezuela, but my family is still there as well as my friends. Today another protest is happening against the dictator that is Maduro. Venezuela represses freedom of speech and this is one of the few ways I can feel that I can help by sharing word of what is happening.

It is a peaceful protest, however “colectivos” are throwing tear gases to the public (as always), the public is trying to get away from it by crossing Caracas’ river where human disposal is thrown. Today another student’s life is added to the countless victims of their actions.

I could honestly keep going on and on but in summary human rights are being violated in Venezuela. We have been under the same government for 19 years now. Caracas is the most dangerous city in the whole world. People are dying from lack of medicine and food, so they quit their jobs all together to get something out of garbage trucks (as minimum wage can barely get you some eggs). So many other things that I could keep listing but this is just a post I’ve done out of the moment but please take time out of your day to research what’s happening at my home country or at least share what you’ve found as Venezuelans sadly can’t.

UPDATE: Two students were killed on this day. Over 400 people detained by peacefully protesting in this date alone in the Capital.

USA. Ohio. Kent. May 4, 1970. Mary Ann Vecchio, a 14 year-old student, kneels beside Jeffrey Milley who’d been shot by the National Guard. Though the photo that first circulated turned out to be manipulated, this is the original, un-doctored version. This picture won the Pulitzer Prize.

The Kent State shootings occurred at Kent State University and involved the shooting of college students by the Ohio National Guard on May 4, 1970. National Guardsmen fired into a group of unarmed students, killing four and wounded another nine—some marching against the Vietnam War and American invasion of Cambodia, some walking by or observing the protest from a distance. 

Guardsmen had on the previous day used tear gas to disperse protesters and, by May 4th, rallies were banned and classes resumed. But 2,000 people gathered in what quickly turned into confrontation. Tear gas and bayonets were met with rocks and verbal taunts, which were met with more than 60 rounds of gunfire. In 1974, all charges were dropped against eight of the Guardsmen involved. There were 28 guards who admitted to firing on top of the hill, 25 of these guards fired 55 rounds into the air and into the ground, 2 of the guards fired .45cal pistol shots, 2 into the crowd, and 3 into the air, one guard fired birdshot into the air. The guardsmen fired 61 rounds over a period of 13 seconds, killing four students and wounding nine others, one of whom suffered permanent paralysis.

There was a significant national response to the shootings: hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools closed throughout the United States due to a student strike of four million students, and the event further affected public opinion—at an already socially contentious time—over the role of the United States in the Vietnam War.

Photograph: John Filo/Getty