war production board

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(Pt.2) #チカーノ #Chicano
The #loveAffair between #Japanese youth and #ChicanoCulture ..

First off, WHAT IS #CHICANOstyle?

Our style has evolved as a resistance to the mainstream culture that continually demanded that we #assimilate. 🔹The earliest Chicano style was #Pachuco #ZootSuit style of the 1940s ..there was a great deal of pride taken in our appearence, but not everyone was happy for us. In 1942 War Time Productions Board regulated the amount of fabric used on suits, and the Zoot Suiter was considered #unAmerican and became the target of hate crimes. 🔹 The Chicano style evolved into the #Cholo style of the 70s and 80s and many Chicanos avoided the cholo style because they were not #gangRelated and did not want to be confused for #gangsters.
🔹
Today the Chicana Chicano style is more dynamic than what is stereotypical, but it continues to retain a certain level of nostalgia. 🔹 Chicanos wear styles from the 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, and 80s with little regard for what is going on in the mainstream fashion world, there is also a great deal of pride in representing indigenous textiles, traditional dresses, #guayaberas, etc.

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Alright, I have to talk about the gem of car finds. This is a really rare machine, a Kaiser Henry J. This is one of the most forgotten 1950′s automobiles from one of the most forgotten auto companies, Kaiser-Frazer.

Kaiser-Frazer was two big names in American industrial power coming together. Kaiser was Henry J Kaiser, American ship building giant and icon of World War II. The other was Joseph W. Frazer, a high ranking member of the boards of Chrysler, Willys-Overland and later Graham-Paige. Frazer’s fame included the creation of Plymouth as Chrysler’s low cost offering, developed the Willys Jeep and Americar. Graham-Paige wasn’t in good standing however, running off of modified Cord cars and desperate for new material.

Kaiser and Frazer decided to buy the company, as Frazer had become the President following his leave of Willys. They began working on newer cars such as the Kaiser Deluxe, Frazer Manhattan and the very famous Kaiser Darrin fiberglass sports car. But the issue was that all of these cars were very high end vehicles, and not much was around for the average joe. So they began working on an everyman car, making a Kaiser as cheap as possible.

And I mean cheap too. There was no trunk latch so you could only get to the trunk from the back seat, it only came as a 2 door sedan and the rear windows were fixed and there were no armrests, glove compartments, flow-through ventilation or sunvisors. And the only engine options were eithe a 68 hp 4-cylinder engine or a 80 6-cylinder borrowed straight from the Willys CJ. And it hit the market in 1950 and was a failure.

Now Kaiser-Frazer marketed the hell out of the car, tooting the “low MPG” horn more than modern manufacturers do. Now this was due to the Korean War starting up and fears of WWII gas rationing were beginning to set in, at least until the War Production Board ended it and gas came to a nice 27 cents a gallon. If that wasn’t enough, the new Chevrolet lineup for 1953 meant the super cheap 150 costed a few dollars more than the Henry J, and Nash’s new Rambler line included a similarly priced cheap offering, making the Henry J a moot point.

And the Henry J became a dead weight for Kaiser, making up only 1.5% of the market in 1950 and slowly decreasing until it reached a paltry .02% in it’s final model year 1954. The production line for the Henry J transitioned to the much more efficient cheaper car, the Willys Aero line. By 1953, Kaiser-Frazer had bought the failing Willys company and merged into Kaiser-Willys. By 1956, they dropped passenger car production to focus on utility vehicles like the Jeep and did this until 1970 when they were bought by AMC.

But there’s a somewhat famous twist with the Henry J, it wasn’t just sold by Kaiser.

It was sold by Sears.

Yes, Kaiser actually sold many Henry J’s to Sears-Roebuck for sale. With sales of the base car slipping, Kaiser worked out a deal with Sears to sell a special version of the Henry J as the Sears Allstate. Named after Sears in-house car parts marque, the Allstate was a Henry J with new hood ornament, grille, interior trim and Allstate tires and battery. This was the first time Sears actually sold a car, and at a low price. However this didn’t work out either, and the Sears Allstate was dropped in 1954 as well.

But the little Henry J is a really interesting car just in how rare they are. Only 2,500 Allstates were sold, alongside 131, 702 Henry J’s. This might seem like a large number, until I bring up that in 1953 alone, Chevrolet made 1,346,475 cars, and that’s only one year. Henry J’s are pretty reliable, although the engine’s are woefully inadequate for the car. But there’s still something interesting to the plucky little Henry J, it just looks cool.

Q&A with Ian Maxtone-Graham about a certain Waylon Sr. *with update*

As someone who is obtaining a minor in creative writing and a major in the biological sciences I am a naturally curious person, being that yours truly needs to find out a lot more about their interest. My routine is to analyze my subject of interest with the curiosity of a five-year old, then asking unlimited questions about said desire like a 4-year old with constant ‘why’s if you don’t stop me. With research you have to go to the sources. Luckily I was able to find Ian Maxtone-Graham the writer of the episode The Blunder Years, (and many more Simpsons episodes in his catalog,) and was able to hook up with him on a Q&A of a character that is pretty dear to my heart, and one with hardly any characterization or backstory surrounding his persona, which makes it even the more fun for observation and headcanon translation for my brain dictation machine.

Again, I cannot give enough thanks and appreciation for his input (though building a pontoon or stealing a yacht is out of the question,) and while some things may eventually be changed in unforeseeable plots and whatnot on the show, it’s nice to obtain just a sliver of information on a powerful force in Montgomery Burns’ life.

Though, I will curse that he may have sunk a personal ship of mine. For that you have made a powerful enemy today, my friend.    *shakes little fist. Dogs howl in the background while thunder claps like a whip above*

What is really generous is that he allowed the interpretation open to us, the fans, for some of the questions including his history and perhaps with more tether, his sexuality (”Straight, I think.”) Waylon is also outstandingly intelligent, which is really something that Burns looks in a right-hand man (and the mun of this blog really admires. I cannot thank you enough for showing me another genius-level character.) Pretty much Smithers Sr. is the Ernest Kanzler to Henry Ford (though a quick search tells me that they did have a strong dynamic, clashing a bit before Kanzler’s plans with Edsel Ford failed and then he was humiliated and shunned until death.)**

** Actually I have an update. Ian sent me an e-mail after he was linked to this article via a twitter response and apparently my source was incorrect about Kanzler becoming humiliated and shunned before death. This is what I get when my research accounts as nothing more than a couple of sites, a paperclip and a few references. Brevity is never the key.

So, I received this in my box which nearly gave me a heartattack afterwards because I thought he was going to hunt me down and kick my ass, send flying monkeys or something:


Just took a second look at your blog post and that sentence is not accurate, if,
as I gather, it was meant to apply to Ernest Kanzler.

He had a great career,
head of the war production board during WW II, which ain’t nothin. American
Industry won World War 2, and the WPB made that all work.  He worked for Bendix
and other places.  Then went back to Ford Motor with Henry II.  So played a role
in both Henry Ford eras.  

I highly recommend you watch Sarah Colt’s
documentary about Henry Ford.  Ernest is in it, and it is utterly fascinating. 
HF was a great industrialist but deeply flawed as a person, beginning but not
ending with an ugly lifelong anti-semitism, which was not rare on those days but
in him was pronounced.

Ian


So, thanks again to Mr. Maxtone-Graham for emerging from the shadows and pointing me in the right direction.  Whether the resulting research was propaganda or misinformation is unknown to me, but when you go deep you always have to go deeper ( and for that I will give you another carbon rod to your score. Just one. Can’t get too greedy) And I am going to give the documentary a look because I love watching documentaries and new information. Yes, as a kid, I was weird.

We give Ian Maxtone-Graham a 6 and a half carbon rod salute here at this blog, for exemplary achievement of the highest regard within the fandom and answering questions whether how dumb, insignificant or short they are. Wondering where the other half of the carbon rod went? It’s probably holding open the door to the garage or moonlighting as a paper weight or in Congress passing bills unchallenged or something. How should I know where it went as long as it comes back sober and before 11 o’clock before the news reminds me where my children are at. I don’t want another responsibility on my head, dammit.

Episode Specific questions:

1. Where did the whole idea of Smithers Sr. come from?

POSSIBLY ME, HARD TO REMEMBER.  THE SHOW IDEA WAS AL’S.

2. Was his name originally Ernest. K. Smithers and if so, why the name change? Was it to keep the anagram ‘Wants Him Sorely’?

I THINK WAYLON SENIOR WAS TO MAKE SMITHERS HIS NAMESAKE AND THUS BELOVED OF BURNS, ETC.  JUST SIMPLER TOO WITH A FATHER.  ORIGINALLY HE WAS ERNEST K.

3. Did you have his death in the reactor core planned from the beginning or was it going to be something else?

WOW.  DON’T REMEMBER.  THE STORY WAS BULT SLOWLY IN THE ROOM FROM AL’S IDEA

4. We were speculating about his job title at the plant. What was it?

DUHHHH…. I’UNNO.  SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR OPERATIONS?  PLOT DEVICE?

5. Was there any reason for him to bring Waylon Jr. to the plant? 

SO WE WOULD SEE HIM AS A BABY.  AND BURNS COULD BOND WITH HIM.


Character Specific questions:

1. How did he meet Burns? Was it though a nuclear project, or something else?

YOU DECIDE.  NO BACK STORY WAS EVER PITCHED ON.

2. What is his birthdate?

UP TO YOU.

3. I surmised from his appearances in From Cur With Love he was pretty stoic, and The Blunder Years he was also brave and caring. How would you describe his personality?

YES.  HIGHLY CAPABLE.  ERNEST KANZLER SENIOR.

4. Did he occasionally clash with Burns? If so, what would it be over?

ERNEST KANXLER AND HENRY FORD I WOULD BE A GOOD COMPARISON.  THE TITAN AND THE VERY CAPABLE RIGHT-HAND.

5. How smart is he?

VERY.  HARVARD LAW.

6. We were speculating about how close his relationship was with Burns. How would you describe it? Would it be unrequited love on Monty’s behalf? ( you can leave that last part out if you feel that you cannot answer it. We were kind of thinking about this since some of the previous Smithers in other incarnations, including ancestal ones seemed to have a fondness for their Burns counterparts much like the current Smithers Jr.)

PURELY PROFESSIONAL, WITH RESPECT BUT ALSO WARINESS.  READ WOLF HALL ETC. - SIMLAR TO THAT PERHAPS.

7. Any quirks?

UP TO YOU

8. Was he bisexual, straight or gay (asking that because lavender marriages were common at the time.)

STRAIGHT, I THINK.

9. What similarities and differences does he share with Waylon Jr.?

DEVOTION TO MB, AND SMARTS.

10. How did he gain Burns’ respect and admiration (I think that last term would be what you would call those emotions? I mean, I have never seen Monty act like that around another before.)

SEE 9

11. I know Burns is an emotional drunk, so what type of drunk would Waylon Sr. be like?

CONTROLLED.  NOT A BIG DRINKER.

12. Did he once work at Springfield University or another college?

PROBABLY ON THE BOARD.

 

Its Our Fight Too!

Item From: Records of the War Production Board. (01/1942-11/03/1945)

This World War II poster was published by the U.S. Government  to mobilize women in military production industries on the behalf of the men mobilized overseas. As the majority of able-bodied young men were conscripted into the Armed Forces and the demand for military equipment grew, the U.S. Government had to rely on women to fill the vacated positions that their male counterparts had left behind. This mobilization of the female workforce helped redefine the segregated gender roles that had existed before the war.

Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/535415

What is sabotage? Sabotage is treason!, ca. 1942-ca.1943

Item From: Records of the War Production Board. (01/1942-11/03/1945)

This World War II poster was created by the War Production Board in the Office of Emergency Management. The War Production Board was tasked with the regulation of all wartime production and allocating the requisite materials and fuel.

As a result, this poster serves the dual purposes of helping workers recognize signs of sabotage and discouraging behaviors that undermined the war production process. It lists several conventional forms of sabotage and treason like breaking tools, machines, and talking about confidential duties. It also equates sabotage with different forms of negligence that eroded the efficiency of production and the quality of the products.  

Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/535191

Western Union A Labor Day Telegram To All Goodyearites, ca. 1942 - ca. 1943.

Item From: Records of the War Production Board (01/1942-11/03/1945).

Today is Labor Day! This telegram was sent from the Assistant Secretary of the Navy and Under Secretary of War reminding the Goodyearites to keep working to support the troops overseas.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DRDk