walt disney animated features

10

Walt Disney Animation + Highest Rated Feature Films on Rotten Tomatoes

  1. Pinocchio (1940)
  2. Zootopia (2016)
  3. Moana (2016)
  4. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)
  5. 101 Dalmatians (1961)
  6. Cinderella (1950)
  7. Dumbo (1941)
  8. Fantasia (1940)
  9. Aladdin (1992)
  10. Beauty and the Beast (1991)
10

The Sword in the Stone

103 in x of animated feature film history
Release: Dec. 25th, 1963
Country: USA
Director: Wolfgang Reitherman

“The Sword in the Stone is the 18th Disney animated feature film, and it the final animated film to be released before Walt Disney’s death. The songs in the film were written and composed by the Sherman Brothers, who later wrote music for other Disney films like Mary Poppins (1964), The Jungle Book (1967), The Aristocats (1970), and Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971).

After years of warring, England can’t agree on a new ruler. A mysterious sword appears, which claims that whoever can pull the sword from its stone will become king. After no one can do it, the test is forgotten. Many years later, Arthur––a measly servant knave known as Wart––dreams of becoming a knight, but is barely certain he may act as squire to castle lord Sir Ector’s son Kay; then, the sorcerer Merlin and his grumpy, talking owl Archimedes invite themselves to the castle and move into its dilapidated north tower. Merlin, who can magically access the future, intends to give Wart a proper education. They transform themselves into animals, face dangerous situations, and battle the Mad Madam Mim. In the end, Arthur accidentally finds the forgotten sword in the stone and becomes king.

The film is based on the novel of the same name, which was first published in 1938 as a single novel. It was later republished in 1958 as the first book of T. H. White’s tetralogy The Once and Future King.

Walt Disney first obtained the film rights to The Sword in the Stone in 1939, and the initial storyboards were produced in 1949. When work on One Hundred and One Dalmatians was completed in 1960, two projects were in development, which were Chanticleer and The Sword in the Stone. The former was developed by Ken Anderson and Marc Davis who aimed to produce a feature animated film in a more contemporary setting. Both of them had visited the Disney archives, and decided to adapt the satirical tale into production upon glancing at earlier conceptions dating back to the 1940s. Anderson, Davis, Milt Kahl, and director Wolfgang Reitherman spent months preparing elaborate storyboards for Chanticleer. When the time came to approve one of the two projects, Walt replied to Anderson’s pitch with ‘Just one word—shit!’

Meanwhile, work on The Sword in the Stone were solely done by veteran story artist Bill Peet. After Disney had seen the 1960 Broadway production of Camelot, he approved the project to enter production. Peet recalled ‘how humiliated [the other team was] to accept defeat and give in to The Sword in the Stone…They never understood that I wasn’t trying to compete with them, just trying to do what I wanted to work. I was the midst of all this competition, and with Walt to please, too.’

This was the first Disney animated feature made under a single director. Previous features were directed by either three or four directors, or by a team of sequence directors under a supervising director. The man hired for the job was veteran animator Wolfgang Reitherman, who would direct all of the Disney features up until the 1980’s.

Although Disney never knew it, he himself was Bill Peet’s model for Merlin. Peet saw them both as argumentative, cantankerous, but playful and very intelligent. Peet also gave Merlin Walt’s nose. This was the second instance in which Walt unknowingly served as model for a wizard, the first being the wizard Yensid from the Sorcerer’s Apprentice in Fantasia (1940). 

For the voice of Merlin, director Wolfgang Reitherman estimated that seventy actors read for the part, but “none evidenced that note of eccentricity that we were seeking. We wanted Merlin to be eccentric but not hokey.” At the same time, Karl Swenson was initially cast for Archimedes, but the filmmakers decided to cast him instead as Merlin. Rickie Sorensen, who had voiced young Arthur, entered puberty during production, which forced the older Reitherman to cast his sons, Richard and Robert, to replace him.

The Sword in the Stone was a financial success at the box office and became the sixth highest-grossing film of 1963. However, it received mixed reviews from critics, who thought it had too much humor and a ‘thin narrative.’”

(source)
(source)

FIRST POSTED: 9/6/16

2

Disney’s The AristoCats was first released on December 24, 1970.

This was the last animated feature to be approved by Walt Disney and the studio’s first animated feature to be entirely completed after his death. It should be noted, however, that Disney had spent time working on the story for The Rescuers (1977) (released seven years later) around the time The Jungle Book (1967) entered production. (x)

7

John Favreau’s The Jungle Book- Shere Khan, the Bengal Tiger

The Jungle Book was released in 2016 by Walt Disney Pictures, the noted creators of the classic 1967 animated feature film. Part live-action, part-CGI, the film was hailed as a benchmark for computer-generated realism in animation in regards to both rendering and motion-capture with the various animals and their associated actors. The tale follows Mowgli, an orphaned boy living in a jungle with several animal guardians. He must avoid the tiger Shere Khan and seek to find his place in a world where many feel he does not belong.

Shere Khan, voiced by Idris Elba, is a scarred Bengal tiger, the largest of the jungle cats. He is a feared predator, although his many wounds come from his interqactions with humans. Thusly, he rules much of the jungle through fear, but himself fears and hates humans. He is hell-bent on killing Mowgli, as he establishes no human may live in the jungle. 

youtube

The amazing animated paper cut films by Lotte Reiniger

90 years ago, in 1926, the first animated feature film appeard in the cinemas preceding Walt Disney’s Snow White by more than a decade. It was Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed (The Adventures of Prince Ahmed) by Lotte Reiniger, employing motifs from One Thousand and One Nights. She used figures cut out of black cardboard placed on a translucent glass plate and had gathered experience with this technique called silhouette animation making short films since 1918. Numerous fairy tales were filmed that way, including Aschenputtel (Cinderella) from 1922.

Lotte Reiniger left Germany after the Nazis came to power, traveling through the world as long as countries allowed her to stay. During a stay in Italy in 1935, she managed to film a beautiful rendition of the adventures of Papageno, the main character of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Magic Flute.

Reiniger’s most prosperous time was in the early 1950s when she lived with her husband in London. Although she never acquired funding to produce feature films, she was able to render, amongst others, the fairy tales Thumbelina, Puss in Boots, and Hansel and Gretel.

In 1955, her first colour film came out, featuring the story of Jack and the Beanstalk. Only three more films appeared until she died in 1981, partially owed to the death of her essential co-worker and husband Carl Koch. She focused on producing still paper cut scenes from Mozarts’s operas.

Lotter Reiniger died in 1981, two years after moving back to Germany.

10

Sleeping Beauty

75 in x of animated feature film history
Release: Jan. 29th, 1959
Country: USA
Director: Clyde Geronimi, Les Clark, Eric Larson, Wolfgang Reitherman

“Sleeping Beauty was the 16th film released from Walt Disney, and was the first animated film to be photographed in the Super Technirama 70 widescreen process.

Princess Aurora is cursed by the evil witch Maleficent, who declares that before the sun sets on Aurora’s 16th birthday she will die by pricking her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel. To try to prevent this, the king places her into hiding, in the care of three fairies. They raise Aurora as their own, calling her Briar Rose and letting her know nothing of her true identity. On the day of her 16th birthday, she unknowingly meets her betrothed prince, as well as reignites Maleficent’s wrath. 

The name given to the princess by her royal birth parents is ‘Aurora’, as it was in the original Tchaikovsky ballet. In hiding, she is called Briar Rose, the name of the princess in the Brothers Grimm’s version. Prince Phillip has the distinction of being the first Disney prince to have a name.

Following the critical and commercial success of Cinderella, writing for Sleeping Beauty began in early 1951. Partial story elements originated from discarded ideas for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and Cinderella. By the middle of 1953, director Wilfred Jackson had recorded the dialogue, assembled a story reel, and was to commence for preliminary animation, but Walt Disney decided to throw out the meeting sequence between Briar Rose and Phillip, delaying the film from its initial 1955 release date.

In December 1953, Jackson suffered a heart attack, by which directing animator Eric Larson of Disney’s Nine Old Men took over as director. Disney instructed Larson that the picture was to be a ‘moving illustration, the ultimate in animation’ and added that he didn’t care how long it would take. Because of the delays, the release date was again pushed back many times. Milt Kahl would blame Walt because ‘he wouldn’t have story meetings. He wouldn’t get the damn thing moving.’ Relatively late in production, Disney removed Larson as the supervising director, and was replaced with Clyde Geronimi.

The artistic style originated when John Hench observed the famed unicorn tapestries at the Cloisters located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

For Sleeping Beauty, Eyvind Earle said he ‘felt totally free to put my own style’ into the paintings he based on Hench’s drawings. Furthermore, Earle found inspiration in the Italian Renaissance as well as Persian art and Japanese prints. When Geronimi became the supervising director, Earle and Geronimi entered furious creative divisions. Geronimi commented that he felt Earle’s paintings ‘lacked the mood in a lot of things. All that beautiful detail in the trees, the bark, and all that, that’s all well and good, but who the hell’s going to look at that?’

Because of the artistic depth of Earle’s backgrounds, it was decided for the characters to be stylized so it can appropriately match. While the layout artists and animators were impressed with Earles’s paintings, they eventually grew depressed at working with a style that many of them regarded as too cold, too flat, and too modernist for a fairy tale. Nevertheless, Walt insisted on the visual design. Marc Davis drew from Czechoslovakian religious paintings when designing Maleficent.

In 1952, Mary Costa was approached by Walter Schumann who told her, ‘I don’t want to shock you, but I’ve been looking (for Aurora) for three years, and I want to set up an audition. Would you do it?’ Costa accepted the offer and landed the role. Marc Davis served as directing animator over the title character with the character’s figure and features based on those of Audrey Hepburn as well as her voice actress, Mary Costa. Helene Stanley was the live action reference.

During its original release in January 1959, Sleeping Beauty earned approximately $5.3 million, not reaching its production costs of $6 million. The high production costs, coupled with the underperformance of much of the rest of Disney’s 1959–1960 release slate, resulted in the company posting its first annual loss in a decade for fiscal year 1960, and there were massive lay-offs throughout the animation department.

At first, the film had mixed reviews from critics. Nevertheless, the film has sustained a strong following and is today hailed as one of the best animated films ever made. Like Alice in Wonderland, which was not initially successful either, Sleeping Beauty was never re-released theatrically in Walt Disney’s lifetime. However, it had many re-releases in theaters over the decades.

This was the last Disney adaptation of a fairy tale for some years due to its mixed critical reception and performance at the box office; the studio did not return to the genre until 30 years later, with the release of The Little Mermaid in 1989.”

(source)
(source)

Sleeping Beauty is available on YouTube.

6

John Favreau’s The Jungle Book- Bagheera the Black Panther

The Jungle Book was released in 2016 by Walt Disney Pictures, the noted creators of the classic 1967 animated feature film. Part live-action, part-CGI, the film was hailed as a benchmark for computer-generated realism in animation in regards to both rendering and motion-capture with the various animals and their associated actors. The tale follows Mowgli, an orphaned boy living in a jungle with several animal guardians. He must avoid the tiger Shere Khan and seek to find his place in a world where many feel he does not belong.

Bagheera, voiced by Ben Kingsley, is Mowgli’s teacher, and acts as the compassionate, patient contrast to Shere Khan’s fearsome demeanor. He is fiercely protective of Mowgli, and the reason the boy survives as a child after he finds him abandoned in the jungle.  

4

Mad Tea Party is inspired by the Mad Hatter’s party sequence in Walt Disney’s animated classic Alice in Wonderland. Featuring the same resplendent floral colors, wacky architectural flourishes and objects of disproportionate size as seen in the movie, this timeless attraction places you in the middle of all the kooky mayhem.  

Today, some incarnation of the attraction exists at every Disney park destination around the world.                

To celebrate the release of The Fox and The Hound, Paul Wenzel created this poster in 1981 highlighting the other Walt Disney animated features.

5

John Favreau’s The Jungle Book- Kaa, the Indian Python

The Jungle Book was released in 2016 by Walt Disney Pictures, the noted creators of the classic 1967 animated feature film. Part live-action, part-CGI, the film was hailed as a benchmark for computer-generated realism in animation in regards to both rendering and motion-capture with the various animals and their associated actors. The tale follows Mowgli, an orphaned boy living in a jungle with several animal guardians. He must avoid the tiger Shere Khan and seek to find his place in a world where many feel he does not belong.

Kaa, voiced by Scarlett Johansson, is a 100-foot Indian Python, intent on devouring Mowgli. She hypnotizes Mowgli in an attempt to swallow him, but is stopped by the combined efforts of Baloo and Bagheera. 

Time for an ‘About’ thing!

~~~~~~

This is an Independant RP Blog for The Horned King from Walt Disney Animation Studios’s 25th animated film, The Black Cauldron(1985)

Also features Creeper.

~~~~~~

What to know :

  • This is a sideblog run by : @krakenguard
  • For a complete list of other muses, see [here]
  • I will be playing the Horned King as he was in the Animated Film.
    I’m afraid I have not read any of the books from the Chronicles of Prydain series.
    I may drop a few references to the books here and there though ;
    at least the things that I know…
  • However, I am more than welcome to roleplay with muses that are book!versed or movie!versed.
  • I am multi-muse friendly, multi-fandom friendly, and OC friendly
  • Despite the intimidating muse, I am super friendly. You’re more than welcome to drop by in the askbox, or send me an’ IM. I’m open for roleplaying, or just general chitter chatter!
4

John Favreau’s The Jungle Book- Akela and Raksha, the Indian Wolves

The Jungle Book was released in 2016 by Walt Disney Pictures, the noted creators of the classic 1967 animated feature film. Part live-action, part-CGI, the film was hailed as a benchmark for computer-generated realism in animation in regards to both rendering and motion-capture with the various animals and their associated actors. The tale follows Mowgli, an orphaned boy living in a jungle with several animal guardians. He must avoid the tiger Shere Khan and seek to find his place in a world where many feel he does not belong.

Raksha, voiced by Lupita Nyong'o, is Mowgli’s adoptive mother, who raises him after he is left with the wolf pack as an infant. She is fiercely protective of all of her cubs, adoptive or otherwise, and shelters them from Shere Khan. Akela, voiced by Giancarlo Esposito, is the leader of the pack, a sly and honorable elder wolf. 

forbes.com
Box Office: Disney's 'Zootopia' Is Now The Second-Biggest Original Movie Ever
By Scott Mendelson

“Zootopia is one of three Walt Disney animated features this year, and, at a glance, it seemed to be the lowest profile of the trio. It’s not the big Pixar sequel (Finding Dory), and it’s not the Thanksgiving fairy tale princess epic (Moana). The quirky gem of a comedy, which sold itself as a zippy talking animal comedy but turned out to be a potent metaphor for race relations and fear-based social control, earned superb reviews and terrific word-of-mouth and sits alongside Deadpool as the ‘Holy crap!’ success story of the year.

And now it’s on the cusp of crossing the $1 billion mark worldwide. With $991 million worldwide, it’s the fourth-biggest animated film ever behind Toy Story 3 ($1.063b), Minions ($1.159b), and Frozen ($1.276b). It is the sixth-biggest 'non-sequel/prequel’ of all time, behind Alice in Wonderland ($1.025b), Jurassic Park ($1.029b, including the 2013 3D reissue), Frozen ($1.27b), Titanic ($2.186b), and Avatar ($2. 787b). It is Walt Disney’s eleventh-biggest movie ever globally.

Oh, and it is the second-biggest 'original’ movie ever released (not accounting for inflation) behind only James Cameron’s Avatar. Zootopia was not based on a television show, a comic book, a novel, or a stage play. It was not a sequel, prequel, or reboot from an existing franchise. It is not based on an actual historical event. It was an entirely original concoction.”

Floyd E. Norman (born June 22, 1935) is an American animator who worked on the Walt Disney animated features Sleeping Beauty, The Sword in the Stone, andThe Jungle Book, along with various animated short projects at Disney in the late ‘50s and early ‘60s.

Norman had his start as an assistant to comic book artist Bill Woggon, who lived in the Santa Barbara, California, area that Norman grew up in.

After Walt Disney’s death in 1966 Floyd Norman left Disney Studios to co-found the AfroKids animation studio with business partner animator/director Leo Sullivan. Norman and Sullivan worked together on various projects such as the original Hey! Hey! Hey! It’s Fat Albert television special which aired in 1969 on NBC (not to be confused with the later Fat Albert series made by Filmation Associates).

Norman returned to Disney at one point in the early 1970s to work on the Disney animated feature Robin Hood. In the 1980s he worked as a writer in the comic strip department at Disney and was the last scripter for the Mickey Mouse comic strip before it was discontinued.[1]

More recently he has worked on motion pictures for Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studios, having contributed creatively as a story artist on films such as Toy Story 2 and Monsters, Inc.for Pixar and Mulan, Dinosaur and The Hunchback of Notre Dame for Walt Disney Animation, among others. He continues to work for the Walt Disney Co. as a freelance consultant on various projects.

Norman has also published several books of cartoons inspired by his lifetime of experiences in the animation industry, Faster! Cheaper!, Son of Faster, Cheaper!, and How the Grinch Stole Disney.

He is currently a columnist for the websites JimHillMedia.com and AfroKids.com.

Norman was named a Disney Legend in 2007. In 2008, he appeared as Guest of Honor at Anthrocon 2008[2] and at Comic-Con International, where he was given an Inkpot Award

————————————–

Happy Belated Floyd! Thanks for showing a way! :-)

8

Pinocchio

12 in x of animated feature film history
Release: Feb. 7th, 1940
Country: USA
Director: Ben Sharpsteen, Hamilton Luske, etc.

Pinocchio was intended to be Disney’s third film, after Bambi. However due to difficulties with Bambi, it was put on hold and Pinocchio was moved ahead in production.

The plot of the film involves an old wood-carver named Geppetto who carves a puppet named Pinocchio. The puppet is brought to life by a blue fairy, who informs him that he can become a real boy if he proves himself to be ‘brave, truthful, and unselfish’. Pinocchio’s efforts to become a real boy involve encounters with a host of unsavory characters.

Early scenes animated by Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston show that Pinocchio’s design was exactly like that of a real wooden puppet. Animator Milt Kahl felt that Thomas, Johnston and Moore were 'rather obsessed with the idea of this boy being a wooden puppet’ and felt that they should 'forget that he was a puppet and get a cute little boy; you can always draw the wooden joints and make him a wooden puppet afterwards.' Despite the iconic nature of the scene in which Pinocchio’s nose grows, it only happens once in the film.

Disney urged the writers to evolve Pinocchio into a more innocent, naïve personality that reflected this design. However, Disney found that the new Pinocchio was too helpless. Therefore, in the summer of 1938 Disney and his story team established the character of the cricket. Originally the cricket was only a minor character that Pinocchio killed by squashing him with a mallet and that later returned as a ghost.

Pinocchio marked the first time an animated film used celebrities as voice actors. Disney cast popular singer Cliff Edwards, also known as 'Ukelele Ike,’ as Jiminy Cricket. Another voice actor recruited was Mel Blanc, most famous for voicing many of the characters in the Looney Tunes cartoons from Warner Bros. Blanc was hired to perform the voice of Gideon the Cat. However, it was decided that Gideon would be mute, so all of Blanc’s recorded dialogue was deleted except for a solitary hiccup.

Pinocchio went into release accompanied by generally positive reviews. Although it became the first animated feature to win a competitive Academy Award – winning two for Best Music, Original Score and for Best Music, Original Song for 'When You Wish Upon A Star’ – it was initially a box office disaster. It eventually made a profit in its 1945 reissue.

Pinocchio was a groundbreaking achievement in the area of effects animation, giving realistic movement to vehicles, machinery and natural elements such as rain, lightning, snow, smoke, shadows and water. Many film historians consider this to be the film that most closely approaches technical perfection of all the Disney animated features.”

 

(see more)

(fun facts)

what will happen to the disney fandom if big hero 6 wins the oscar?

… uhm nothing special ….