waking up

How-To: Sensing Energy

A lot of the newbies I’ve talked to are so hung up on seeing energy. They have  had results, just not results they could see with their eyes. I’d say that 95% of the time , I perceive energy either by feeling it or by using my “6th sense”. Some individuals with the natural talent of seeing auras may be able to pick up visuals easier than others.

The first step to perceiving energy, is to learn to feel it. After you start feeling it, you develop your 6th sense naturally and, in time, that’s all you’ll use.  You just gotta open yourself up and be open to it. Try visualizing energy beaming into parts of your body and see if you can feel something there. This stuff gets easier, you just have to trust yourself and practice.

Here are some ways we use to describe how these energies feel to us that might help you increase your awareness of them. They may be sensed with the hand or all over the body

  • Buzzing or tingling, like when your leg is asleep.
  • Prickly, like static electricity.
  • A feeling of heat without a heat source. (Usually denotes a LOT of energy moving.)
  • A feeling of cold without a physical source.
  • A sense of a rising or falling pitch without any audible sound.
  • A feeling of something flowing through you like wind or a stream or current of warm water.
  • A feeling like a wave passing through you.
  • A sense that some other Being, like an angel or ghost has stepped inside of you (“incorporation”)
  • Pressure or a pushing sensation with nothing touching you.
  • A pulsing sensation that is not in time with your heartbeat. (Usually a balancing “Healing Pulse”.)
  • A sensation of bubbles rising like carbonated water or Alka-Seltzer.
  • A “clanging” sensation like striking a piece of metal held in your hand with a hammer.
  • A spinning or whirling sensation.
  • A fluttering or shimmering sensation.
  • A sensation like a change in altitude or barometric pressure.
  • A sense of lightness that wasn’t present before.
  • A sense of expansion in some way.
  • A shift in consciousness like meditation or falling asleep.
  • A sudden sigh or yawn. (Denotes that you are getting relieved of something by what you came into contact with.) 
To go to bed and to wake up again day after day besides a woman, to lie in bed with our arms around each other and drift in and out of sleep, to be with each other—not as a quick stolen pleasure, nor as a wild treat—but like sunlight, day after day in the regular course of our lives. I was discovering all the ways that love creeps into life when two selves exist closely, when two women meet.
—  Audre Lorde
The truth is that waking up can be a disturbing process.

Who really wants to find out that everything they thought was real was nothing but a pocket full of dreams? Who wants to find out that everything they hold onto and cling to is the very reason that they suffer? Who really wants to find out that we’re all addicted to qualities like approval, recognition, control, and power, and that none of these things actually brings an end to suffering? In fact, they’re the cause of suffering! So the truth is that most of us don’t really want to wake up. We don’t really want to end suffering. What we really want to do is manage our suffering, to have a little bit less of it, so that we can just go on with our lives as they are, unchanged, the way we want to live them, maybe feeling a little better about them.

~ Adyashanti

How to stop snoozing - 

We all do it, it’s nothing new, yet it’s something that wrecks our “this year I’m gonna wake up early” goals. Snoozing is the single most comforting and annoying thing in the day.

So how do we stop snoozing and actually wake up on time?

1. Don’t put your phone (or alarm clock if you use that) too close to your bed when you sleep - basically, it should be far enough so that you actually get up to even snooze it.

2. Don’t use a single alarm tune for more than a couple of weeks. In my experience, once you get used to that tune, it’s pretty easy to go back to sleep after snoozing it, or even letting it play.

3. Keep your phone/alarm clock in different places everyday (or at least every other day). Set them apart by only a few inches if not more, but the change in position helps you up in the morning when you have to look for your phone rather than just go to the one specified place and shut it off.

4. Try an alarm that wakes you up with something cute/useful - like daily news, cute critters, whatever makes you happy. Don’t put a screaming animal as an alarm - mornings should be pleasant, and an annoying sound to wake up to will make you less inclined to wake up at all! Also, chances are you’ll shut a bad alarm off rather than snoozing it - not the best idea.

5. Go to bed earlier if you can. Duh.

6. Plan your sleep so you wake up at the end of your REM cycles - ideal sleep lengths would be 3 hours, 4.5 hours, 6 hours, 7.5 hours, 9 hours and so on. You’ll feel fresher and be more likely to not snooze.

7. Plan something good for your morning - this one is pretty obvious. My morning schedule goes like something like this these days:

  • 5:00 - wake up
  • get dressed
  • make coffee/hot chocolate
  • blog a bit
  • 6:00 - study Danish (my favorite thing to study right now!)

I study Danish until I’ve completed whatever I wanted to do, and then I move on to the next subject. If I put say, chemistry (which I hate) in my early morning sessions, I’d snooze until 7.

So I hope that helped! If you’re trying to wake up early, remember you can do it! Good luck, my owls xx

If you really want to be free, you’ve got to be prepared to lose your world—your whole world. If you’re trying to prove your world view is right, you might as well pack your bags, and go home. If you want to wake up and find, “Hallelujah! I was right about it all,” just go on vacation or back to work, and don’t drive yourself crazy on spiritual matters. But if it’s slightly appealing to think about waking up and realising, “Oh, I was totally wrong. I was totally wrong about myself and about everybody else. I was totally wrong about the world,” you might be in the right place.
—  Adyashanti, Emptiness Dancing