wait this is fr

2

This is the single greatest thing I’ve ever impulse bought.

My previous pencil pouch was a realistic juice box but the shock factor on THIS THING IS BETTER. Wait until I pull this out in class.

Over the past few years I’ve been working on a project called The Elements. It’s FR inspired and includes one full length composition for each element. This is a preview with roughly 30 seconds from each. I hope to release the full project rounds about my three year anniversary in June! Until then, enjoy!

Earth 00:03 
Fire 00:30
Wind 01:03
Water 01:29
Shadow 01:56
Lightning 02:23
Ice 02:49
Light 03:16
Nature 03:43
Plague 04:09
Arcane 04:36 

How to plan the perfect XYZ dragon

so you all might know me as that one weird girl who’s obsessed with XXY dragons, but let me tell you, there is nothing more beautiful and satisfying to look at than a perfectly coordinated XYZ dragon! they’re also super fun to dress! so this is a relatively useless guide to planning your own! I thought it would be helpful for newbies who are still getting used to all the beautiful colors fr has to offer.

Step 1: Picking a Primary

I started with a blank base so I had a clear vision of what I wanted to go for. Skink is a great gene to start with, because it usually has a stark contrast between its main and accent colors. and also, that throat gradient is to die for. it looks really great with treasure primaries like runes, lace, and contour. other great primaries with accents are poison and petals! Iri also works well on certain breeds.

Step 2: Selecting a Secondary

Here is where things actually get fun. I like to choose a color based on the accent color of the primary. Here, cyan is a perfect match for the accent of lead skink. I like that cyan butterfly just has that pale yellow accent color on the tips, but is otherwise a solid bright blue. You can already see the harmony between the colors beginning to work! Other secondaries that have great accent colors are toxin, spinner, and sometimes shimmer. Keep in mind that with certain colors like orca and metals, pretty much any gene will show off a contrasting accent color because that’s just how that color works! (Those ones are my favorite.)

Step 3: Taking a Tertiary

This is the step where it all comes together. That little pale yellow accent color in cyan butterfly matches perfectly with flaxen. Contour is a great simple gene that doesn’t overwhelm other genes or make them too busy, but adds a ton to bring the secondary and primary together. In addition, choosing an eye color is important too–here I chose light eyes to match the tertiary color. I mentioned great treasure tertiaries in step 1, but glimmer, opal and stained can also make for lovely, unique XYZ dragons!

Other Examples!

These are just a few more combinations that can look stunning. With the first dragon I started with his tangerine opal and chose his other colors to be complimentary to it. The second dragon had his primary chosen first, then his tertiary, and his secondary was picked to accent his stunning throat gradient. (Super helpful note: bogsneaks look great with glimmer and underbelly because their throat color will always show through!) The last dragon’s secondary was picked first, and her other genes were chosen to match. On to the last step!

Step 4: Cry

So you want to actually make these dream dragons a reality? Go ahead and search their colors and see what pops up.

There’s a reason it’s nicknamed “the crying workshop.” Have fun with your breeding projects!

okay so

i was just at target and this really cute guy walked up to me and was like “hey i just wanted to say that you’re really beautiful and i was just wondering if i could maybe get your name and number” and me being the awkward piece of shit i am literally freaked out and ran out of the store…this is why i’m single