vulcan-language

Vulcan Terms of Endearment & Sentiment

ashal-veh- darling; person (noun)

ashayam- beloved; a beloved person (noun)

ashalik- darling; beloved (noun)

tal-kam- dear (noun)

k'diwa- beloved (noun)

t'hy'la- friend; soulmate; brother; lover (noun)

taluhk nash-veh k'dular- i cherish thee (phrase)

taluhk- precious; dear; beloved

shok-tor- to kiss

ozh'esta- to finger kiss/finger embrace

el'ru'esta- hand embrace/hold hands

nartau- to embrace

ashau- to love (verb)

ashaya- love (noun)

teraya-martaya- to hug (verb)

shon-ha-lak- love at first sight

  • Bones: Here's that report you wanted, petal
  • Spock: thank you, t’nash-veh e’shua ha’pla-kur
  • Bones: *blushes*
  • Uhura: What was that?
  • Spock: It is an affectionate name, Leonard requested one
  • Bones: Cute, right?
  • Uhura: "My pale blue devil"?
  • Bones:
  • Spock:
  • Bones: WhaT
Vulcan Language Fact*:

After not having a translation for the phrase “I don’t care” exist within a framework of words and modifiers that humans could understand, Federation Standard Vuhlkansu decided to adopt the same syntactical structure for the phrase as the existing one in German. As a result, the literal translation of “I don’t care” in Vulcan is “this is salad to me.”

* = may not be factually correct, but it sure as hell is funny

Vulcan language headcanon

Due to taluhk nash-veh k'du being an ancient phrase, it quite literally means I am cherished with thee. Because k'du means with you. T’du means of you. It gives anyone learning Vulcan a headache with the variations being k’du,k’dular, t’dular, t’du,du, and dular. The modernization of this phrase is Taluhk nash-veh du which means I cherish you. Most Vulcans prefer to use the ancient version of it since it is endearing including Spock and Sarek. Nyota and T'Pring use the modernization of the phrase.

Twenty Basic Textbook Phrases, As Requested.
  1. hello, hi = tonk'peh (addressing a close friend, family member or loved one = nashaut)
  2. We come to serve. (formal greeting) = Sarlah etek dvin-tor.
  3. Your service honours us. (answer to the formal greeting) = Vu dvin dor etwel.
  4. thanks, thank you = lesek (also: th'i-oxalra)
  5. please = sanu
  6. You are welcome. = Malating. (also: Veling.)
  7. yes = ha (also: ah)
  8. no = rai (also: ri)
  9. maybe = sos'eh
  10. My name is … . = Nam-tor ahm t'nash-veh … .
  11. What is your name? = Nam-tor ahm t'du ra (formal: Nam-tor ahm t'odu ra.).
  12. Live long and prosper./Peace and long life. = Dif-tor heh smusma./Sochya eh dif.
  13. Where is (the) … ? = Nam-tor … wilat.
  14. What is (the) … ? = Nam-tor … ra.
  15. I can speak (some) Vulcan. = Kup-stariben nash-veh (ein-)Vuhlkansu.
  16. I (would) like … . = Tishau nash-veh … .
  17. Can I have (the) … ? = Kup-ma nash-veh … ha.
  18. What is … in Vulcan? = Nam-tor … ra svi'Vuhlkansu.
  19. What does … mean? = … tvai ra.
  20. May I … ?/ Could I … ? = Sos … ha.


- T'Puhku

First post, we’ll begin with one of my favorites- The opening monologue to the Original Series.
It looks rough because it is- this is the notebook I use to jot things down and try them out for the first times.

Stukh- kim-ek'zhel. Nam-tor aifa halanlar t'yel hali Enterprais. Kau-tevun-skrol t'ish-veh - nisau flekh uzh-panular - tal-tor uzh-hakiv heh uzh-sutenivayalar. Vakh hal-tor wilat ki'hal-tor kling fa.

Vulcan translation of a love song

Ri nam-tor etek rifainusular na’ashaya
Fai-tor du to-golar heh nash-veh isha
Nam-tor bosh-kugaya t’ra nah-tor nash-veh
Ri’prah tu nash s’fan vath sasu
Aitlu var-tor nash-veh du uf olau nash-veh
Wa’bolau tor nash-veh ken-tor du
~~~
Raravamet:
Ri dungi-nav tan-tor nash-veh du abu
Ri dungi-nav vravshau nash-veh du
Ri dungi-nav sasahrat heh ek’trasha nash-veh du
Ri dungi-nav tor nash-veh maf-tor du
Ri dungi-nav tar-tor nash-veh rom-halan
Ri dungi-nav riyeht-var-tor heh dash-tor nash-veh du
~~~
Ki’pufai-tor etek tik vath na’dom wu
Ki’suh khaf-spol t’du hi
Nam-tor du nuh’fusik tar-tor
Svi’fai-tor etek on ki’fihal-tor ra
Fai-tor etek zhagra heh dungi-mavau
Heh kuv deshkau tu uf olau nash-veh
Ri var-tor du nash-veh nuh’glan-famau tu gla-tor
~~~
Dah raravamet
~~~
Tan-tor nash-veh du abu
Tan-tor nash-veh du abu
Ri dungi-nav tan-tor nash-veh
Ri dungi-nav tan-tor nash-veh
Tan-tor nash-veh du abu
Ri dungi-nav tan-tor nash-veh
Ri dungi-nav tan-tor nash-veh
Tan-tor nash-veh du abu
Ki’pufai-tor etek tik vath na’dom wu
Ki’suh khaf-spol t’du hi
Nam-tor du nuh’fusik tar-tor
Svi’fai-tor etek on ki’fihal-tor ra
Fai-tor etek zhagra heh dungi-mavau
Aitlu var-tor nash-veh du uf olau nash-veh
Wa’bolau tor nash-veh ken-tor du
~~~
Reh raravamet
~~~

Keep reading

A word of encouragement in Vulcan

Beginners mistake: mokuhlek tor ish-veh nash-veh= You can do it.

Correct version is: [Kup-tor du ish-veh=you can do it.]



EDUCATIONAL ADDITION:

Kup=To be able to

Tor=to.

Du=(after a consonant sound) you.

Ish-veh=he,she, it.

Mokuhlek= noun, put things in.

thisisntmyrealhair  asked:

I'm not sure if you guys have been asked this before or not, but could you shed a little light on the words for love, beloved, lover and companion? I see a few different Vulcan words used for those terms interchangeably and I'd like to know which ones are correct and used for which relationships.

love - ashaya

This is used the same way the English word is.

beloved - ashayam or k'diwa
a beloved person; dear - tal-kam

Ashayam is the general term that two people in a relationship might use for each other. It is derived from the word ashaya.

K'diwa carries more emotional connotation and is barely used for that reason. It stands for very deep affection and should be used between married partners only. It is a shortened form of the ancient word k'hat'n'dlawa, which means “half of each other’s heart and soul.”

Tal-kam or the suffix -kam in general is more commonly used to affectionately address a younger person. Saavik, for example, is (in private) usually addressed as Saavik-kam by Spock.

friend - fainusu
companion - besu
lover, a loving person - ashausu
friend, lover, life-long companion - t'hai'la

Fainusu, literally “known-person”, would be used for regular friends and acquaintances, but not as a term of endearment.

Besu, the companion, just means a person who travels with or accompanies another.

Ashausu is a more technical term for lover, literally “love-person” and means any person who loves - for example, ka-ashausu means homosexual.

Then there’s t'hai'la (more commonly, but incorrectly spelled t'hy'la), which always raises some controversy, mostly because it also translates as brother. However, this absolutely does not mean biological brother, which is sa-kai in Vulcan. T'hai'la is an intimate term of endearment that is probably best translated as “soulmate”. It implies a very deep friendship and connection that is not necessarily platonic. 

I hope this helped and I apologise that it took so long

Sochya eh dif

T'Puhku