vote for liberty and freedom

10

It’s been easier to convince people to hand over half their income, their children to war, and their freedoms in perpetuity - then to engage them in seriously considering how roads might function in the absence of taxation.

Martin Luther King Jr. On Communism (quote)

​“In communism the individual ends up in subjection to the state. True, the Marxist would argue that the state is an “interim” reality which is to be eliminated when the classless society emerges; but the state is the end while it lasts, and man only a means to that end.

And if any man’s so-called rights or liberties stand in the way of that end, they are simply swept aside. His liberties of expression, his freedom to vote, his freedom to listen to what news he likes or to choose his books are all restricted. Man becomes hardly more, in communism, than a depersonalized cog in the turning wheel of the state. This deprecation of individual freedom was objectionable to me. I am convinced now, as I was then, that man is an end because he is a child of God.

Man is not made for the state; the state is made for man. To deprive man of freedom is to relegate him to the status of a thing, rather than elevate him to the status of a person. Man must never be treated as a means to the end of the state, but always as an end within himself.“

How not to vote in early America,

Today in the United States it seems there is an emphasis on “getting out the vote”, with the idea that voting is not only an American right but an American duty.  Complaints abound that American voter turnout is dismally poor, among the lowest rates of developed nations.  Several programs and campaigns have been created to convince non voters, especially younger adults, to go to the polls and vote.  Even governments had taken steps to ease the difficulties of voting, such as early voting programs and absentee ballots.  While we may think voter turnout numbers are dismal today, in early American history voting rates were especially bad. With America’s first national presidential election (1789), less than 1.3% of the population voted.  In the presidential election of 1792, .88% of the population voted, less than one percent! In the presidential election of 1796 between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, around 2.2% of the population voted.  From 1789 up to the 1820’s and 30’s, this trend continued, with small percentages of the population, often single digits, turning at the polls to vote.

So what accounted for such low voter turnouts?  Of course late 18th century transportation may account for some numbers, as many citizens could not travel to a polling place, however there were larger reasons at work. The fact of the matter was that while America was founded on the ideals of liberty and freedom, universal voting rights was not a part of that freedom, and the vast majority of Americans could not legally vote.  Today voting is a basic right taken for granted, however in the late 18th and early 19th century, voting was a privilege reserved only for an elite few.

When the Constitution was ratified in 1787, it made no mention of voting, none whatsoever.  The rules of voting, determining who can vote, who can’t, and how voting was to be conducted was to be determined by the individual states.  Each state could determine voting regulations as they saw fit.  In addition, the US Constitution and Bill of Rights was only to be respected by the Federal Government.  Individual states did not have to respect the Constitution, it was a free for all where states could establish their own state religions, limit free speech or the press despite the 1st Amendment, could have legal slavery despite several provisions in the Constitution confirming freedom for all, and create their own regulations defining who was and wasn’t a citizen.  It wouldn’t be until the adoption of the 14th Amendment in 1868 that US Citizenship was officially defined, and all states were forced to recognize the Constitution and Bill of Rights.  The implication of this system was that many states set severe restrictions on voting which limited the voting population to an elite few.  While each state had its own regulations, there were many that were in common, most of which survived from earlier colonial voting regulations.  So in early America could vote?  Who couldn’t vote?

The largest group of people who couldn’t vote were women.  So right off the bat, at least 50% of the US population was disqualified from voting.  In most states only men had the right to vote.  The only exception was New Jersey, which defined all voting citizens as male or female, and believe it or not women commonly voted in New Jersey at the time.  Unfortunately, women’s suffrage was brought to a screeching halt in 1807 when a law was passed banning women from voting in New Jersey.  Over the decades some states would allow women to vote, especially western states such as Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, and Idaho.  National women’s suffrage would not occur until the ratification of 19th Amendment in 1920.

Another gaping maw in America’s early voting population were minorities.  First and foremost, slaves could not vote.  Free black men could only vote in a few states, such as New York.  However, the vast majority of African Americans could not vote whether slave or free.  Nor could Native American’s.  Religion could also disqualify a prospective voter, as many states had religious requirements that barred certain groups such as Jews, Catholics, Quakers, non-Christians, and other non-Protestant Christian sects. It would take a Civil War to bring about 15th Amendment (1869), which prohibits the denial of the right to vote based on race, color, or previous condition of servitude.  A century later the Voting Rights Act of 1965 would prohibit discrimination in voting.

So while women and minorities couldn’t vote, what about white men?  Again most white males couldn’t vote.  First there was an age restriction.  Back then one had to be at least 21 to vote, today thanks to the 26th Amendment (1971), it is now down to 18.  There is even talk of lowering it to 16.  While this weeded out a few prospective voters, by far the regulation that prohibited most white males from voting were property requirements.  For centuries in colonial, English, and European tradition, owning a minimum amount of property or wealth was a requirement for citizenship.  The idea behind this was that the most enthusiastic citizens were those who had the largest economic stake in the country.  During America’s colonial era this tradition passed on, until eventually most states adopted property requirements for voting as well.  Generally, the requirement stood at either 50 acres of land or its equivalent value in wealth.   A very strict regulation, such property requirements ensured that only upper class, and perhaps upper middle class men could vote.  Property requirements would be in effect with many states in the late 18th and early 19th century.  After the War of 1812 some states began to drop property requirements.  Then in the 1820’s and 30’s the election of Andrew Jackson as president sounded a death knell for property requirements.  Jackson advocated a system of popular suffrage, a part of “Jacksonian Democracy”, and many Jacksonian Democrats rewrote state constitutions and laws to do away with property requirements. It wouldn’t be until the late 1820’s and 1830’s when a sizable percentage of the population could vote.  As a result of Jacksonian Democracy, by the Civil War most white men over the age of 21 could vote.  Some states would try a backdoor route to prevent poor whites from voting by instituting poll taxes, or poll fees.  Later, this method would also be used to prevent poor blacks from voting as well.  Poll taxes would be outlawed with the 24th Amendment in 1964.

So in early America, say between 1788 and 1830, who were the elite few who had the inalienable right to vote?  White men 21 and over who were wealthy and Protestant.  If you don’t fit into that category, go home! No voting for you!

latimes.com
Anti-gun Democrat pleads guilty to gun-running
By Los Angeles Times

Remember Leland Yee? He’s the anti-gun California Senator who was ironically charged with gun-running a while back. He decided to plead guilty to the charges.

Former state Sen. Leland Yee entered a packed federal courtroom here Wednesday looking relaxed. Unable to find a seat, he squeezed in next to reporters who had once covered the child psychologist’s legislative work as an advocate for youth and the mentally ill, and were now here to watch him plead guilty in a sweeping public corruption case.He shook hands and chatted genially. Then, after taking an oath before U.S. District Judge Charles R. Breyer, the San Francisco Democrat admitted to racketeering, concluding an unruly case, involving public corruption, promises of gun-running and more, that shook Sacramento.“Today’s news turns the page on one of the darker chapters of the Senate’s history,” Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles) said in a statement.

Of course, in my opinion, the real problem with this is not that he moved or owned or sold certain weapons, it’s that he was a lawmaker who voted to ban others from doing it.

Prayer For Catholic Voters

Heavenly Father, send down Your Spirit upon all Catholics as they prepare to vote.  Help them be wise in their choices and faithful to the teachings of the Church.  May their vote uphold the dignity of every human being from conception until natural death.  May their their vote be for those who will try their best to provide for the needy, disenfranchised, and neglected or forgotten, in our society.  May their vote be one that is thoughtful about the future selection of Supreme Court Justices who will determine how our Constitution will be interpreted for the next 50 years affecting our children, future children, and grandchildren.  May their vote support the beauty, dignity, and holiness of the sacrament of marriage.  Please Father, bless each voter so that they may in good conscience vote for life, liberty (especially religious freedoms), and the pursuit of true happiness.  Amen. 

No Vote for You! — How not to vote in early America,

Today in the United States it seems there is an emphasis on “getting out the vote”, with the idea that voting is not only an American right but an American duty.  Complaints abound that American voter turnout is dismally poor, among the lowest rates of developed nations.  Several programs and campaigns have been created to convince non voters, especially younger adults, to go to the polls and vote.  Even governments had taken steps to ease the difficulties of voting, such as early voting programs and absentee ballots.  While we may think voter turnout numbers are dismal today, in early American history voting rates were especially bad. With America’s first national presidential election (1789), less than 1.3% of the population voted.  In the presidential election of 1792, .88% of the population voted, less than one percent! In the presidential election of 1796 between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, around 2.2% of the population voted.  From 1789 up to the 1820’s and 30’s, this trend continued, with small percentages of the population, often single digits, turning at the polls to vote.

So what accounted for such low voter turnouts?  Of course late 18th century transportation may account for some numbers, as many citizens could not travel to a polling place, however there were larger reasons at work. The fact of the matter was that while America was founded on the ideals of liberty and freedom, universal voting rights was not a part of that freedom, and the vast majority of Americans could not legally vote.  Today voting is a basic right taken for granted, however in the late 18th and early 19th century, voting was a privilege reserved only for an elite few.

When the Constitution was ratified in 1787, it made no mention of voting, none whatsoever.  The rules of voting, determining who can vote, who can’t, and how voting was to be conducted was to be determined by the individual states.  Each state could determine voting regulations as they saw fit.  In addition, the US Constitution and Bill of Rights was only to be respected by the Federal Government.  Individual states did not have to respect the Constitution, it was a free for all where states could establish their own state religions, limit free speech or the press despite the 1st Amendment, could have legal slavery despite several provisions in the Constitution confirming freedom for all, and create their own regulations defining who was and wasn’t a citizen.  It wouldn’t be until the adoption of the 14th Amendment in 1868 that US Citizenship was officially defined, and all states were forced to recognize the Constitution and Bill of Rights.  The implication of this system was that many states set severe restrictions on voting which limited the voting population to an elite few.  While each state had its own regulations, there were many that were in common, most of which survived from earlier colonial voting regulations.  So in early America could vote?  Who couldn’t vote?

The largest group of people who couldn’t vote were women.  So right off the bat, at least 50% of the US population was disqualified from voting.  In most states only men had the right to vote.  The only exception was New Jersey, which defined all voting citizens as male or female, and believe it or not women commonly voted in New Jersey at the time.  Unfortunately, women’s suffrage was brought to a screeching halt in 1807 when a law was passed banning women from voting in New Jersey.  Over the decades some states would allow women to vote, especially western states such as Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, and Idaho.  National women’s suffrage would not occur until the ratification of 19th Amendment in 1920.

Another gaping maw in America’s early voting population were minorities.  First and foremost, slaves could not vote.  Free black men could only vote in a few states, such as New York.  However, the vast majority of African Americans could not vote whether slave or free.  Nor could Native American’s.  Religion could also disqualify a prospective voter, as many states had religious requirements that barred certain groups such as Jews, Catholics, Quakers, non-Christians, and other non-Protestant Christian sects. It would take a Civil War to bring about 15th Amendment (1869), which prohibits the denial of the right to vote based on race, color, or previous condition of servitude.  A century later the Voting Rights Act of 1965 would prohibit discrimination in voting.

So while women and minorities couldn’t vote, what about white men?  Again most white males couldn’t vote.  First there was an age restriction.  Back then one had to be at least 21 to vote, today thanks to the 26th Amendment (1971), it is now down to 18.  There is even talk of lowering it to 16.  While this weeded out a few prospective voters, by far the regulation that prohibited most white males from voting were property requirements.  For centuries in colonial, English, and European tradition, owning a minimum amount of property or wealth was a requirement for citizenship.  The idea behind this was that the most enthusiastic citizens were those who had the largest economic stake in the country.  During America’s colonial era this tradition passed on, until eventually most states adopted property requirements for voting as well.  Generally, the requirement stood at either 50 acres of land or its equivalent value in wealth.   A very strict regulation, such property requirements ensured that only upper class, and perhaps upper middle class men could vote.  Property requirements would be in effect with many states in the late 18th and early 19th century.  After the War of 1812 some states began to drop property requirements.  Then in the 1820’s and 30’s the election of Andrew Jackson as president sounded a death knell for property requirements.  Jackson advocated a system of popular suffrage, a part of “Jacksonian Democracy”, and many Jacksonian Democrats rewrote state constitutions and laws to do away with property requirements. It wouldn’t be until the late 1820’s and 1830’s when a sizable percentage of the population could vote.  As a result of Jacksonian Democracy, by the Civil War most white men over the age of 21 could vote.  Some states would try a backdoor route to prevent poor whites from voting by instituting poll taxes, or poll fees.  Later, this method would also be used to prevent poor blacks from voting as well.  Poll taxes would be outlawed with the 24th Amendment in 1964.

So in early America, say between 1788 and 1830, who were the elite few who had the inalienable right to vote?  White men 21 and over who were wealthy and Protestant.  If you don’t fit into that category, go home! No voting for you!

If you vote Republican because you think they protect freedom and individual liberties, please remember:

40 Republican Senates voted against an NSA reform bill because they think without uncontrollable spying on Americans, another 9/11 will happen.

They only care about fear. Specifically, they only care that you are constantly afraid to live in this country so they can keep having power over you.