volcano views

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Volcanic mountains in Guatemala

A skylight​ is not just a view to the world above you, but ​a window to the world beneath. In this photo​,​ taken last month on the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater at Kīlauea​ in Hawaii, a volcanic skylight reveals a river of molten rock, drifting just below the charred surface. It’s a powerful reminder of the forces at work below us. Photo by U.S. Geological Survey.

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Silver Star Mountain is an amazing alpine zone. The altitude is not high, but a fire in 1902/3 cleared the trees away, and many never grew back, leaving windswept alpine plants and meadows. The views are tremendous, and especially colorful on a winter day. From the top, six major Cascade peaks can be seen: Rainier, St. Helens, Adams, Hood, Jefferson, and North Sister.

Geologically, the mountain is a granite pluton that formed the plumbing of an ancient volcano. Several sub peaks, including Sturgeon Rock and Pyramid Rock, are old basaltic andesite flows that came out of the former volcano. The view is nearly unparalleled, and the mountain is one of the highest for a long ways, allowing for such an unobstructed view.

These are from November 4th of this year. Total mileage for this day was 13.2 miles.

Ten years ago, Augustine volcano in Alaska swelled, rumbled and erupted. A gigantic cloud of ash rose above the mountain and two lava flows crawled down its sides. The eruption resulted in ash fall throughout south-central Alaska and disrupted air traffic over the state. Historically, Augustine volcano has been the most active volcano in Alaska’s Cook Inlet region with recent eruptions in 1976, 1986 and 2006. Photo by Cyrus Read, @usgs. #tbt