voicing

Ways To Describe Someone's Voice
  • adenoidal (adj): if someone’s voice is adenoidal, some of the sound seems to come through their nose
  • appealing (adj): an appealing look/voice shows that you want help, approval, or agreement
  • breathy (adj): with loud breathing noises
  • brittle (adj): if you speak in a brittle voice, you sound as if you are about to cry
  • croaky (adj): if someone’s voice sounds croaky, they speak in a low, rough voice that sounds as if they have a sore throat
  • dead (adj): if someone’s eyes or voice are dead, they feel or show no emotion
  • disembodied (adj): a disembodied voice comes from someone who you cannot see
  • flat (adj): spoken in a voice that does not go up and down; this word is often used for describing the speech of people from a particular region
  • fruity (adj): a fruity voice or laugh is deep and strong in a pleasant way
  • grating (adj): a grating voice, laugh, or sound is unpleasant and annoying
  • gravelly (adj): a gravelly voice sounds low and rough
  • gruff (adj): this voice has a rough, low sound
  • guttural (adj): a guttural sound is deep and made at the back of your throat
  • high-pitched (adj): true to its name, a high-pitched voice or sound is very high
  • hoarse (adj): someone who is hoarse, or has a hoarse voice, speaks in a low, rough voice, usually because their throat is sore
  • honeyed (adj): honeyed words or a honeyed voice sound very nice, but you cannot trust the person who is speaking
  • husky (adj): a husky voice is deep and sounds hoarse (as if you have a sore throat), often in an attractive way
  • low (adj): a low voice is quiet and difficult to hear; also used for describing a deep voice that has a long wavelength
  • matter-of-fact (adj): usually used if the person speaking knows what they are talking about (or absolutely think they know what they are talking about)
  • modulated (adj): a modulated voice is controlled and pleasant to listen to
  • monotonous (adj): this kind of voice is boring and unpleasant due to the fact that it does not change in loudness or become higher/lower
  • nasal (adj): someone with a nasal voice sounds as if they are speaking through their nose
  • orotund (adj): an orotund voice is loud and clear
  • penetrating (adj): a penetrating voice is so high or loud that it makes you slightly uncomfortable
  • plummy (adj): a plummy voice or way of speaking is considered to be typical of an English person of a high social class; this word shows that you dislike people who speak like this
  • quietly (adj): in a soft, quiet voice
  • raucous (adj): a raucous voice or noise is loud and sounds rough
  • ringing (adj): a ringing voice is very loud and clear
  • rough (adj): a rough voice is not soft and is unpleasant to listen to
  • shrill (adj): a shrill voice is very loud, high, and unpleasant
  • silvery (adj): this voice is clear, light, and pleasant
  • singsong (adj): if you speak in a singsong voice, your voice rises and falls in a musical way
  • small (adj): a small voice is quiet
  • smoky (adj): a smoky voice is sexually attractive in a slightly mysterious way
  • softly spoken (adj): someone who is softly spoken has a quiet, gentle voice
  • soft-spoken (adj): speaking or said in a quiet, gentle voice
  • sotto voce (adj, adv): in a very quiet voice
  • stentorian (adj): a stentorian voice sounds very loud and severe
  • strangled (adj): a strangled sound is one that someone stops before they finish making it
  • strident (adj): this voice is loud and unpleasant
  • taut (adj): used about something such as a voice that shows someone is nervous or angry
  • thick (adj): if your voice is thick with an emotion, it sounds less clear than usual because of the emotion
  • thickly (adv): with a low voice that comes mostly from your throat
  • thin (adj): a thin voice or sound is high and unpleasant to listen to
  • throaty (adj): a throaty sound is low and seems to come from deep in your throat
  • tight (adj): shows that you are nervous or annoyed
  • toneless (adj): does not express any emotion
  • tremulous (adj): if your voice is tremulous, it is not steady; for example, because you are afraid or excited
  • wheezy (adj): a wheezy noise sounds as if it is made by someone who has difficulty breathing
  • wobbly (adj): if your voice is wobbly, it goes up and down, usually because you are frightened, not confident, or are going to cry
  • booming (adj): very loud and attention-getting
  • quavering (adv): if your voice quavers, it is not steady because you are feeling nervous or afraid
  • a voice like a foghorn: very loud voice
  • in an undertone: using a quiet voice so that someone cannot hear you
  • someone’s dulcet tones: the sound of someone’s voice as they speak

a fun little thing i drew to cope with season 4 klance withdrawal

We normally decide how to pronounce an unfamiliar word by drawing analogies with English words we already know. For example, we knew how to pronounce “-ly” from words like “slowly,” so it isn’t too hard to figure out how to pronounce “bigly.”

But sometimes this approach runs into problems. In this case, there just aren’t any common English words ending in -efe. A wild-card search on the very comprehensive dictionary aggregator OneLook yielded the following list of words: jefe, fefe, efe, hefe, okeefe, hogrefe, keefe, reprefe, tefe and kefe. Pretty obscurefe.

So we have to search further afield. Maybe we go for the Spanish word “jefe,” meaning “boss.” Maybe we look to a different vowel, as in “fife” or “cafe.” Maybe we look to other spellings of the /f/ sound at the end of a word, like “ff” as in “fluff,” “gaffe” and “coiffe.”

The problem is that none of these is a close analogue, making it unsurprising that several Twitter polls have found that people are strongly split. But it looks like the lack of -fefe endings won’t remain true for long. People have started smashing covfefe together with other words to refer to the covfefe meme. There now exists the “threadfefe” (a thread about covfefe), an “exorfefe” (an exorcist of the word covfefe), a “presifefe” (president) and the slogan “If u think you’re above covfefe you’re part of the probfefe.”

how is it that all of lucretia’s one liners in moonlighting always the funniest fucking shit 

  • “oh you’re so deep in the test, you are knee-deep in test town”
  • “i particularly liked when you ripped the arms off that poor helpless robot” 
  • “here’s the problem: they just run right off the goddamn thing”
  • “goddammit we love domes around here”
  • “yes, it’s that we very quickly cut your hand off and get the bracer off, but then we attach the hand back and it’s like, not a big deal”
  • “are there any non terrible questions”
How to tell apart theta θ and eth ð

It’s easy to find words that distinguish between other voiced/voiceless pairs in English - bus and buzz, fine and vine - but the two sounds represented by the “th” sequence in English are rarer and harder to learn, especially since English uses the same spelling for both of them.  

A lot of people give up and just use near-minimal pairs like “think” and “this”, or “theta” and “they”, but there are actually a few true minimal pairs that you can use: 

thigh  -  thy
ether  -  either 
thistle  - this’ll 

It’s worth noting that function words in English, like pronouns, prepositions, and determiners, tend to have ð, while content words, especially nouns, tend to have θ.

Theta θ and eth ð are also found in the following noun/verb minimal pairs, at least for many dialects:   

wreath  -  wreathe 

(I put a wreath on the door / I wreathe the door)

teeth  - teethe

(my teeth / the baby is teething) 

loath  -  loathe 

(I’m loath to do it / I loathe doing it) 

sheath  -  sheathe

(in a sheath / to sheathe one’s sword)

sooth  -  soothe 

(for sooth! / to soothe someone) 

Here the vowels differ, but the theta θ to eth ð, noun to verb relationship is preserved: 

cloth  -  clothe

(wear cloth / clothe oneself)

bath  -  bathe

(take a bath / bathe the baby)  

breath  -  breathe 

(take a breath / breathe deeply)

Make sure to try them at full volume, not whispering, because whispering involves turning off your vocal cords (which is why you can whisper when they’re inflamed with laryngitis). 

These sounds are called dental fricatives or interdental fricatives, because the sound is produced by a thin stream of air friction where the tongue is at (dental) or between (interdental) the teeth. In the International Phonetic Alphabet, the voiceless interdental fricative, theta, is written θ, and the voiced interdental fricative, eth, is written ð

As a bonus, here’s a minimal pair for ʒ and ð, thanks to recent developments in clothing technology: pleasure and pleather. 

A Curious Little Cutout
My voice
A Curious Little Cutout

Based on a gag from one of @squigglydigg‘s streams with @xiospirit. I just loved this joke too much not to make something out of it. Hope you enjoy!

(Feel free to commission me or leave a request if you wanna hear more VA stuff from me!)