voice majors

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Our last women’s history month post this month is also in honor of Transgender Day of Visibility on the voice actress Maddie Blaustein. Maddie was a major voice actor and creator in various industries, and if you grew up with anime, you’ve probably heard her voice at one time or another. Maddie was a transgender woman who worked for several companies.

Maddie was born in October 1960 in Long Island, New York. She was the second-oldest of five siblings, and was Jewish. She was born intersex and began transitioning later on in her life. She was a fairly well-known activist for transgender rights within the community. She has been credited with other names in work, including Madeline Blaustein and Kendra Bancroft

Maddie was perhaps most well known for her work as a voiceover actress, primarily in anime. She worked for family dubbing company 4kids, which was a New York-based company that dubbed anime for saturday morning cartoons. Perhaps her most famous role was that of the talking pokemon Meowth in the famous franchise, a role she carried for several seasons. She also portrayed Pokemon characters Lt. Surge and Bill, along with many minor characters. Other famous roles that she took on include that of Solomon Mutou (Yugi’s grandfather) in the anime Yu-Gi-Oh! and  Chef Kawasaki in the english dub of the anime Kirby: Right Back at Ya!

She voiced a large number of characters in her lifetime, one of her most recent roles being that of Satorious in Yugioh GX. She was arguably one of 4kids’ more famous voice actors, having at least one role in almost all of their properties. Some of the other 4Kids dubs she had a role in include Ultimate Muscle, One Piece, and Cubix. She acted in other things as well, including the characters Li Zhuzhen and Colonel Hyuga in the game Shadow Hearts. She also portrayed characters in Samurai Deeper Kyo and Slayers Try.In the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise, she played the robot Omega in several games as well as the president in Shadow the Hedgehog

Maddie did often work outside of animation. She wrote and did art for several comics, including Static, Power Pachyderms, and Hardware. She was an active content developer for the game Second Life under the name Kendra Bancroft, and gained a good reputation for her skills as a 3D modeler. She was also the creative director for the Weekly World News for a time. Her brother Jeremy Blaustein is a translator and video game localizer. 

Maddie passed away in late 2008 from an untreated stomach virus. Memorials poured in from fans who grew up with her work all over the internet.

Her work in anime, comics, and voice acting is not forgotten and lives on with the people who grew up listening to her work. Her impact on the anime industry in the west has been felt by many, and her dedication to excellence as an artist and a person is not forgotten. 

When people say opera is a dying art, but it's been around since the 16th century and people don't know most popular songs from less than a hundred years ago

Originally posted by nansgifs

List of cartoon characters voiced by the show’s creator(s)

Adventure Time
Pen Ward voices Lumpy Space Princess and Shelby

Gravity Falls
Alex Hirsch voices Stan Pines, Soos, Bill Cipher, McGucket and various others

Rick and Morty
Justin Roiland voices Rick, Morty, Mr. Meeseeks and various others
Dan Harmon voices Bird Person.

Phineas and Ferb
Dan Povenmire voices Dr. Doofenshmirtz
Jeff “Swampy” Marsh voices Major Monogram

Milo Murphy’s Law
Dan Povenmire voices Dakota
Jeff “Swampy” Marsh voices Cavendish

OK K.O. Let’s Be Heroes!
Ian Jones-Quartey voices Radicles, Darrell and various others

Regular Show
J. G. Quintel voices Mordecai and High-Five Ghost

Feel free to add more

Grammys Preview: The Best Bets For The Big Four Awards

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

Sheeran has racked up ­nominations ­numbering in the double digits (and in 2016 won song of the year for “Thinking Out Loud”). Lamar has more trophies to his name (seven to Sheeran’s two), but none in the general categories. Regardless, Sheeran’s Divide and Lamar’s DAMN. should be locks for ­nominations. Joining those likely frontrunners, Lorde’s Melodrama is a solid bet: Though her follow-up to 2013’s Pure Heroine came up a little short commercially, it was ­considered a daring, winning step forward after her rookie success. JAY-Z’s 4:44 – a ­thoughtful, confessional album from a true icon – looks like it could nab him long overdue recognition in a category in which he has never been nominated ­(provided the album’s exclusive TIDAL release didn’t limit its audience too much).

Don’t discount the influence of two of the year’s most powerful artist ­narratives. Gaga’s ­intimate Joanne met lukewarm reviews, but it has Mark Ronson’s imprimatur and caps off a year when Gaga won plenty of hearts with a triumphant Super Bowl performance, her revelation of her chronic battle with fibromyalgia and the release of her well-received Netflix ­documentary, Gaga: Five Foot Two. And with We Got It From Here…Thank You 4 Your Service, A Tribe Called Quest offered a ­stunning, unexpected comeback recorded with Phife Dawg before his death in 2016 – and, as Q-Tip and crew announced, their final project.

Elsewhere, Harry Styles, inspired by classic rock from Bowie to Badfinger, was a remarkable transformation for the former One Direction-er. The Bruno Mars juggernaut could well roll on with 24K Magic, as could The Weeknd with Starboy. Miranda Lambert’s powerful double album, The Weight of These Wings, was arguably Nashville’s strongest ­offering this year. Though Metallica has never been ­nominated in a general category, its Hardwired… To Self-Destruct was widely seen as a welcome return to form. Among rap’s contenders, Logic’s Everybody and Big Sean’s I Decided were big hits that earned critical notice. As to who might fill the unexpected outsider slot Sturgill Simpson occupied in 2017, Americana favorite Jason Isbell’s The Nashville Sound (the rare indie release to hit No. 1 on the country albums chart) and Father John Misty’s Pure Comedy garnered sufficient support to make both long-shot contenders.

RECORD OF THE YEAR

With nearly 5 billion streams and 4 ­billion video views, Luis Fonsi’s “Despacito” (featuring Daddy Yankee and, on the remix, Justin Bieber) was the year’s biggest sensation. Honoring the first Spanish-language song since “Macarena” to top the Hot 100 – which went on to tie Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men’s “One Sweet Day” for most weeks ever at No. 1 on the chart – would be an ideal opportunity for The Recording Academy to recognize Latin music’s ever-increasing impact on the mainstream. Among the year’s other chart-toppers, Sheeran’s “Shape of You” and Lamar’s “Humble” seem like ­shoo-ins. At least one of Mars’ two hits, “That’s What I Like” and “24K Magic,” should earn a spot. Styles’ soaring “Sign of the Times” could earn recognition as a strong debut single. And among Nashville ­voters, Sam Hunt’s “Body Like a Back Road” – which topped the Hot Country Songs chart for a record-shattering 34 weeks (and crossed over to the Hot 100’s top 10) – should get the biggest push in this category.

From there, the year’s biggest singles covered a wide range of styles. The ­massive success of Rae Sremmurd’s “Black Beatles” and Migos’ “Bad and Boujee” made next-gen Atlanta rap ­impossible to ignore. “Malibu” epitomized Miley Cyrus’ ’70s Southern California reboot, and The Weeknd delivered two strong tracks in “Starboy” and “I Feel It Coming.” The unlikely (but highly ­successful) ­combination of The Chainsmokers and Coldplay for “Something Just Like This” ticks a lot of boxes for ­voters, while Imagine Dragons’ “Believer” could ­represent for modern rock. And though “Look What You Made Me Do” was ­polarizing, never underestimate the power of Taylor Swift – did any other song ­generate more debate this year?

SONG OF THE YEAR

Sheeran’s “Shape of You” (written with a team including producer Steve Mac) and Lamar’s “Humble” (credited to Lamar and Mike WiLL Made-It) will likely face off again for the top ­songwriting honor, and many other record of the year ­competitors could join them: Styles and a team led by producer Jeff Bhasker for “Sign of the Times”; Mars and crew ­(including ­production teams Shampoo Press & Curl and The Stereotypes) for “That’s What I Like” or “24K Magic”; Cyrus and collaborator Oren Yoel for “Malibu”; and Hunt alongside Zach Crowell, Shane McAnally and Josh Osborne for “Body Like a Back Road.”

That cohort’s strongest competition might come from songs with timely (or timeless) messages. Gaga’s raw ­vulnerability on “Million Reasons” – ­written with Hillary Lindsey and Ronson, and roundly ­considered the most solid ­offering on Joanne – makes it her best chance at a major ­nomination. Logic’s “1-800-273-8255,” ­written with Arjun Ivatury and featured vocalists Alessia Cara and Khalid, was an ambitious ­commentary on suicide ­prevention that has peaked at No. 3 on the Hot 100.

Other new artists with chances for a nod: James Arthur, whose “Say You Won’t Let Go” (by Arthur, Neil Ormandy and Steve Solomon) was the year’s breakout low-key ballad, and Julia Michaels, whose “Issues,” written with Justin Tranter and producers Benny Blanco and Stargate, introduced her as a major new voice. And yet again, don’t count out Swift – this time for “Better Man,” a song she wrote alone (a possible plus to some ­authenticity-seeking voters) and then handed off to her friends in Little Big Town.

The signs as opera singers
  • Aries: does not accept chorus roles, never marks during rehearsal
  • Taurus: always taking Alexander technique and helping others with their anxiety
  • Gemini: sings other people's parts in the back of the room
  • Cancer: Emotionally connects to their character more than anyone else in the production
  • Leo: posts more about their music on their social media/website than they do practicing
  • Virgo: never lets go of their score, is practicing or studying at all possible moments
  • Libra: doesn't make friends, just makes "connections" for future gigs
  • Scorpio: always asking everybody else what role they're studying, what they're auditioning for, and what their range is
  • Sagittarius: auditions for roles/programs/companies they're not ready for but "just for the experience"
  • Capricorn: has the cleanest and best fucking resumé you've ever seen
  • Aquarius: writes down every single thing the conductor and director say, never reads any of the notes
  • Pisces: late to the rehearsal because they were crying in a practice room

guys…. you do realize the voice actors literally have NO say on what gets written into the show, right?

No Time for Emotion
Henry Jackman & Matthew Margeson
No Time for Emotion

Almost heaven, West Virginia, Blue Ridge Mountains, Shenandoah River.

Life is old there, older than the trees, younger than the mountains, blowing like a breeze.

Country roads, take me home to the place I belong.

West Virginia, mountain mamma, take me home, country roads.

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Yall need to stop sleeping on Normani