visual-language

2

i love the shapes and textures of the trees and branches in this photo,
but it looked kinda boring/unstructured to me with its
50 shades of green and no focus to concentrate on.

with a little help of my good ol’ friend photoshop
this magical dreamscape emerged. enchanté!
_______________________________

i’m really torn between a very realistic, no-fuss-approach to photography 
and over-the-top-editing lately. 

while i admire photographers who have found a very distinctive style and recognizable visual language, i for my part don’t want to make a commitment yet. i like experimenting just too much!

macro or panorama,
a grainy, low definition film quality or high contrasts and popping colors,
low-key soft pastels or freaky photo montages:
whatever the image calls for - i want it all!

random - or eclectic - call it what you want,
but i dearly hope you enjoy this crazy ride, too ;D.

3

There’s an awful lot of grammar snobs out there banging on about punctuation misuse and ‘the butcher’s apostrophe’ and I agree with them to a certain extent. It’s nice to know the rules of the road before you start to drive one-handed, singing along to David Bowie whilst scrabbling around in the glovebox for that packet of mints you need to take away the smell of your booze-breath.

However, one the flipside I couldn’t really give a shit. People overuse & misuse punctuation all the time and, unless you’re being a crashing pedant, it’s normally perfectly easy to get what’s being said.

In all the furore surrounding the use of punctuation very little time is spent marvelling at just how clever and important this visual language is. It binds sentences and informs communication. Without it we’re lost. So, as a tribute, here are 14 punctuation marks that you may not know or may not know the name of.

“For the rebrand­ing of dig­i­tal agency Manifest, Eight Hour Day took a con­cep­tual approach by explor­ing the notions of time, human expe­ri­ence, con­nec­tions and cre­ativ­ity. And as a result, in addi­tion to the usual brand­ing deliv­er­ables, the team also devel­oped an impres­sive 40-character glyph lan­guage”

I love this simple and elegant visual language, even if some of solutions are a little too abstract. Clever design work from Eight Hour Day.

More here.