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I love Meryl Streep even more now, somehow.

Transcript:

“I love you all. You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve lost my voice in screaming and lamentation this weekend. And I have lost my mind sometime earlier this year. So I have to read. Thank you, Hollywood Foreign Press [Association]. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said, you and all of us in this room, really, belong to the most vilified segments in American society right now. Think about it. Hollywood, foreigners, and the press. But who are we? And, you know, what is Hollywood anyway? It’s just a bunch of people from other places. I was born and raised and created in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola [Davis] was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Carolina, grew up in Central Falls, Long Island. Sarah Paulson was raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids from Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Italy. Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem. Where are their birth certificates? And the beautiful Ruth Negga was born in Ethiopia, raised in— no, in Ireland, I do believe. And she’s here, nominated for playing a small town girl from Virginia. Ryan Gosling, like all the nicest people, is Canadian. And Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, is here for playing an Indian raised in Tasmania. Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. If you kick ‘em all out, you’ll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts.

They gave me three seconds to say this. An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are different from us and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many, many powerful performances this year that did exactly that — breathtaking, passionate work. There was one performance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart — not because it was good. There was nothing good about it. But it was effective and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter, someone he outranked in privilege, power, and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it. I still can’t get it out of my head because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life. And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life, because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing. Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. And when the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.

This brings me to the press. We need the principled press to hold power to account, to call them on the carpet for every outrage. That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in our constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press and all of us in our community to join me in supporting the committee to protect journalists. Because we’re going to need them going forward. And they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.

One more thing: Once, when I was standing around on the set one day whining about something, we were going to work through supper, or the long hours or whatever, Tommy Lee Jones said to me, “Isn’t it such a privilege, Meryl, just to be an actor?” Yeah, it is. And we have to remind each other of the privilege and the responsibility of the act of empathy. We should all be very proud of the work Hollywood honors here tonight. As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia said to me once, “Take your broken heart, make it into art.” Thank you.”

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“Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Thank you. Please sit down. Please sit down. Thank you. I love you all. You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve lost my voice in screaming and lamentation this weekend. And I have lost my mind sometime earlier this year. So I have to read.

Thank you, Hollywood foreign press. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said. You and all of us in this room, really, belong to the most vilified segments in American society right now. Think about it. Hollywood, foreigners, and the press. But who are we? And, you know, what is Hollywood anyway? It’s just a bunch of people from other places.

I was born and raised and created in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola [Davis] was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Carolina, and grew up in Central falls, Long Island. Sarah Paulson was raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids from Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Italy. Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem. Where are their birth certificates? And the beautiful Ruth Negga was born in Ethiopia, raised in – no, in Ireland, I do believe. And she’s here nominated for playing a small town girl from Virginia. Ryan Gosling, like all the nicest people, is Canadian. And Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, is here for playing an Indian raised in Tasmania.

Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. If you kick ‘em all out, you’ll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. They gave me three seconds to say this. An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are different from us and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many, many powerful performances this year that did exactly that, breathtaking, passionate work.

There was one performance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart. Not because it was good. There was nothing good about it. But it was effective and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter, someone he outranked in privilege, power, and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it. I still can’t get it out of my head because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life.

And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life, because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing. Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. When the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.

This brings me to the press. We need the principled press to hold power to account, to call them on the carpet for every outrage.That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in our constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press and all of us in our community to join me in supporting the committee to protect journalists. Because we’re going to need them going forward. And they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.

One more thing. Once when I was standing around on the set one day whining about something, we were going to work through supper, or the long hours or whatever, Tommy Lee Jones said to me, isn’t it such a privilege, Meryl, just to be an actor. Yeah, it is. And we have to remind each other of the privilege and the responsibility of the act of empathy. We should all be very proud of the work Hollywood honors here tonight.

As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia, said to me once, take your broken heart, make it into art. Thank you.”

- Meryl Streep acceptance speech at 74th Golden Globes

SNM 107 07/15/2017 late

Macbeth: Joe Poulson
Lady Macbeth: Ida Saki
Macduff: Austin Dale Tyson
Lady Macduff: Jenna Saccurato
Duncan: Phil Atkins
Malcolm: Shane Jensen
Banquo: Brendan Duggan
Bald Witch: Stephanie Crousillat
Boy Witch: Tyler Phillips
Sexy Witch: Emily Oldak
Hecate: Jackie Schram
Porter: Nick Dillenburg
Agnes Naismith: Isabel Umali
Danvers: Sarah Stanley
Speakeasy: Daniel Staaf
Fulton: Amadi Washington
Taxi: Paul Corning
Matron: Virginia Logan
Nurse: Ryan VanCompernolle
Man in Bar: Casey Jordan
Woman in Bar: Ginger Kearns / Ava Lee Scott

Ryan’s nurse rocked my world. I was blind now I see. 

Never would have expected my highlight of this weekend was the nurse.

I watched Boy Witch for a whole loop and Macduff for about 20 minutes before my knees cried for a stop. After a quick rest in the bar, I stumbled into Ryan’s nurse and I knew I must follow her.

I have been spending more and more time with different nurses recently: Stephanie, Kristen, Austin, Jenna, etc. Ryan excelled. She killed every single dance scene. The beginning of the limb dance, before circling around the space, she started with scratching the wall with her nails and making the nervous sounds. Even her creative choice of clipping all the pegs on her pinafore and connecting all the sleeves together to form a happy place of her own was such a pleasure to watch. She managed to make me feel intimidated and scared during the 1:1. Her acting was overwhelmingly powerful.

I don’t understand why it took me over 70 shows to open my eyes to nurse and see the beauty in his/her loop. Even though he/she could feel distant most of the time, but it is a loop full of highly skillful dance scenes with very little down time.

You’ll have to forgive me, I’ve lost my voice in screaming in lamentation this weekend, and I have lost my mind sometime earlier this year, so I have to read.

Thank you, Hollywood Foreign Press. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said, you and all of us in this room really, belong to the most vilified segments in American society right now. Think about it, Hollywood, foreigners, and the press.

But who are we, and what is Hollywood anyway? it’s just a bunch of people from other places. I was born and raised and educated in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola [Davis] was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Carolina, came up in Central Falls, Rhode Island. Sarah Paulson was born in Florida, raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids from Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Vicenza, Veneto, Italy, and Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem. Where are their birth certificates?

And the beautiful Ruth Negga was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, raised in London — no Ireland, I do believe, and she’s here nominated for playing a small-town girl from Virginia. Ryan Gosling like all the nicest people, is Canadian. And Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, is here playing an Indian raised in Tasmania. So Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners, and if we kick them all out we’ll have nothing to watch except football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts.

They gave me three seconds to say this. So an actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are different from us, and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many powerful performances this year that did exactly that. Breathtaking, compassionate work. But there was one performance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart. Not because it was good. There was nothing good about it. But it was effective and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter, someone he outranked in privilege, power, and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it, and I still can’t get it out of my head. Because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life.

And this instinct to humiliate when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing.

“Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. And when the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.

OK, this brings me to the press. We need a principled press to hold power to account, to call them on the carpet for every outrage. That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in our Constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press, and all of us in our community, to join me in supporting the Committee to protect journalists, because we’re going to need them going forward, and they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.

One more thing: Once when I was standing around on the set one day, whining about something, you know, we were going to work through supper or the long hours or whatever. Tommy Lee Jones said to me, “Isn’t it such a privilege, Meryl, just to be an actor?” Yeah, it is, and we have to remind each other of the privilege and the responsibility of the act of empathy. We should all be very proud of the work Hollywood honors here tonight.

As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia said to me once, ‘Take your broken heart. Make it into art.’ Thank you.

—  Meryl Streep, 74th Golden Globes

FROM: HARPER’S BAZAAR

HERE’S THE FULL TRANSCRIPT OF MERYL STREEP’S POWERFUL GOLDEN GLOBES SPEECH

“Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Thank you. Please sit down. Please sit down. Thank you. I love you all. You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve lost my voice in screaming and lamentation this weekend. And I have lost my mind sometime earlier this year. So I have to read.

Thank you, Hollywood foreign press. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said. You and all of us in this room, really, belong to the most vilified segments in American society right now. Think about it. Hollywood, foreigners, and the press. But who are we? And, you know, what is Hollywood anyway? It’s just a bunch of people from other places.

I was born and raised and created in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola [Davis] was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Carolina, and grew up in Central falls, Long Island. Sarah Paulson was raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids from Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Italy. Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem. Where are their birth certificates? And the beautiful Ruth Negga was born in Ethiopia, raised in – no, in Ireland, I do believe. And she’s here nominated for playing a small town girl from Virginia. Ryan Gosling, like all the nicest people, is Canadian. And Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, is here for playing an Indian raised in Tasmania.

Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. If you kick ‘em all out, you’ll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. They gave me three seconds to say this. An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are different from us and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many, many powerful performances this year that did exactly that, breathtaking, passionate work.

There was one performance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart. Not because it was good. There was nothing good about it. But it was effective and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter, someone he outranked in privilege, power, and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it. I still can’t get it out of my head because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life.

And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life, because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing. Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. When the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.

This brings me to the press. We need the principled press to hold power to account, to call them on the carpet for every outrage.That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in our constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press and all of us in our community to join me in supporting the committee to protect journalists. Because we’re going to need them going forward. And they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.

One more thing. Once when I was standing around on the set one day whining about something, we were going to work through supper, or the long hours or whatever, Tommy Lee Jones said to me, isn’t it such a privilege, Meryl, just to be an actor. Yeah, it is. And we have to remind each other of the privilege and the responsibility of the act of empathy. We should all be very proud of the work Hollywood honors here tonight.

As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia, said to me once, take your broken heart, make it into art. Thank you.”

- Meryl Streep

10

Eyes Open extra - [1/??]

Ryan Hardy & Joe Carroll
In 2003, while investigating the Virginia Campus Murders, Ryan comes to Joe for his extensive knowledge about writer Edgar Allen Poe. As the topic of conversation moves on, Ryan finds himself receiving advice from Joe about his daughter, Sasha, who he no longer speaks to.

“Don’t take the relationship with your child for granted, Ryan. One moment, they’ll want to tell you everything about their day and the next, they won’t want anything to do with you. Call your daughter. One more, huh? A toast to fatherhood, for it is a precious gift.”

“Sure, why not?”

The Trouble with Teaching Rape Law

Asking students to engage in discussions of rape law has become so difficult that teachers are starting to give up on the subject. Jeannie Suk, a professor at Harvard Law School, explains why this is problematic.

Above: Members of the audience hold signs during a board of visitors meeting about sexual assault at the University of Virginia. Photograph by Ryan M. Kelly/The Daily Progress/AP

Interview with Australian-born Artist Virginia Ryan, based in Grand Bassam, Côte d'Ivoire

Bonjour! I would like to start by thanking you and saluting everything you seek to represent through your art. It is with immense pleasure that I sit here with you today. We have a lot to talk about and I would like to start with this question. Please, tell us about the knowledge you had of the African continent, before you ever set one foot on its soil.

Well I had no clear idea, no verifiable information. I have read books, novels, but most of the knowledge was from a colonial or post-colonial standpoint. So it was either something like that, or simply bad news, news of war, genocide, and famine. The overall image of Africa had been tainted with everything that portrayed a somewhat negative image. Even if that image was unfortunately true in some parts, it’s still a stereotypical image that never faded away for most westerners I should say, although that is changing.  Fortunately for me, I had met a great friend and artist, Kouame Akoto, from Kumasi, Ghana, who openly invited me to see the continent for myself. Therefore my first step as an artist learning something of West Africa was through the nation of Ghana. I’ve so far spent 12 years on the Continent, going back and forth between here and my home in Italy. After some years in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, I now have a studio in the old colonial city of Grand Bassam where I  work as an artist: through painting and photography mainly. 

From the journey you’ve experienced so far, tell us if it was something that you’ve imagined the continent to be, especially Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire.

 

No. No. Everything was far from what I had set in mind. First off, the cities of Accra or Abidjan, among others, were cosmopolitan. In fact, it seems not only as a melting pot of African nationals, but also like a bridging of communities from Lebanon, Syria, India, many European countries, and now China. People from everywhere with different cultural backgrounds also live here and enjoy a vibrant life which I had not imagined before coming. It was such a new experience for me, even though my stay in Cote d’Ivoire was interrupted, due to political instability and the post-electoral crisis experienced in 2011. But I am back here now and things would seem to be getting better. 

 

It seems like you’ve adopted Cote d’Ivoire. Tell us more about your cultural and artistic experiences there.

Life is vital here. Nature too is vibrant, things grow everywhere!  Until a few years ago whenever I returned to Europe, and I would say I’d been in Africa, numerous people would always say things like  – “Oh why?” – “Oh how?” Like I’ve said earlier, they had succumbed to an overall ‘negative’ imagining of the continent. But things are changing and the stereotyping seems to be less powerful. Now the general comments are about Africa, is Africa being the future, which is very true; but put in context that is true for any other place, since everything has a future or at least we hope ! But on a serious note, Africa has a bright future ahead, if only the right people would invest in the right things, and art, in all forms, has to be one of those 'things’. Overall, things are changing for the better, don’t you think? It is an exciting time. Cote d’Ivoire itself is booming in many areas, but still not enough attention is given to traditional and contemporary culture. Also, one thing I have noticed about the Ivorians in particular is the sense of pride and dedication to appearance: beautiful clothes, garments and textiles. No matter if you are rich or poor, there is always that necessity to look good in the streets, at home, or in the markets! It’s something that I found interesting and at times a little bit ironic given the economic difficulties experienced by many. The culture of La Sape, or La Sapologie, known in Congo as well, is a modern cultural aspect which is an example.  On the artistic platform, visual culture in Cote D’Ivoire has always been present in its streets, markets, and people. This should be remembered and celebrated!

Also in my ongoing photographic project, Selling Dreams, I set out to photograph the recent gigantic billboards one sees everywhere in Abidjan, advertising the idea of reaching happiness through luxury items.

A lot of new artists are getting more and recognition, artists such as Paul Sika, who has recently published his work of art, a logbook, At The Art Of Me, The Logbook of a Joyful Dreamer. Yes, I appreciate Paul’s work and commitment very much as well as many other Ivorian artists. We currently are both represented by the Cecil Fakhoury Galerie, the opening of which says a lot about the current potential for growth in appreciation of contemporary art in Cote d’Ivoire and West Africa more generally.  

 

I’ve had the pleasure to appreciate your works as well, especially, The Rue Du Commerce Series. It seems to us like a beautification of the real life world you’ve captured through photographs transformed into an idealized artistic rendition through painting. 

 

Les Femmes de Gagne - Rue Du Commerce Series

Well the initial images themselves were already powerful, since the people, especially the women and their garments, were exceptionally visually arresting. But thank you!

Oh I thank you!

For more on Virginia Ryan and her work, please visit her website and like her Facebook page.

Thank you.

 

Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Thank you. Please sit down. Please sit down. Thank you. I love you all. You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve lost my voice in screaming and lamentation this weekend. And I have lost my mind sometime earlier this year. So I have to read.

Thank you, Hollywood foreign press. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said. You and all of us in this room, really, belong to the most vilified segments in American society right now. Think about it. Hollywood, foreigners, and the press. But who are we? And, you know, what is Hollywood anyway? It’s just a bunch of people from other places

I was born and raised and created in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola [Davis] was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Carolina, and grew up in Central falls, Long Island. Sarah Paulson was raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids from Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Italy.

Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem. Where are their birth certificates? And the beautiful Ruth Negga was born in Ethiopia, raised in — no, in Ireland, I do believe. And she’s here nominated for playing a small town girl from Virginia. Ryan Gosling, like all the nicest people, is Canadian. And Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, is here for playing an Indian raised in Tasmania.

Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. If you kick ’em all out, you’ll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. They gave me three seconds to say this. An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are different from us and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many, many powerful performances this year that did exactly that, breathtaking, passionate work.

There was one performance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart. Not because it was good. There was nothing good about it. But it was effective and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter, someone he outranked in privilege, power, and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it. I still can’t get it out of my head because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life.

And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life, because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing. Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. When the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.

This brings me to the press. We need the principled press to hold power to account, to call them on the carpet for every outrage. That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in our constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press and all of us in our community to join me in supporting the committee to protect journalists. Because we’re going to need them going forward. And they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.

One more thing. Once when I was standing around on the set one day whining about something, we were going to work through supper, or the long hours or whatever, Tommy Lee Jones said to me, isn’t it such a privilege, Meryl, just to be an actor. Yeah, it is. And we have to remind each other of the privilege and the responsibility of the act of empathy. We should all be very proud of the work Hollywood honors here tonight.

As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia, said to me once, take your broken heart, make it into art. Thank you.

—  Meryl Streep - Golden Globes Speech 2017
THE FULL TRANSCRIPT OF MERYL STREEP'S POWERFUL GOLDEN GLOBES SPEECH

“Thank you very much. Thank you very much. Thank you. Please sit down. Please sit down. Thank you. I love you all. You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve lost my voice in screaming and lamentation this weekend. And I have lost my mind sometime earlier this year. So I have to read.

Thank you, Hollywood foreign press. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said. You and all of us in this room, really, belong to the most vilified segments in American society right now. Think about it. Hollywood, foreigners, and the press. But who are we? And, you know, what is Hollywood anyway? It’s just a bunch of people from other places.

I was born and raised and created in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola [Davis] was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Carolina, and grew up in Central falls, Long Island. Sarah Paulson was raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids from Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Italy. Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem. Where are their birth certificates? And the beautiful Ruth Negga was born in Ethiopia, raised in – no, in Ireland, I do believe. And she’s here nominated for playing a small town girl from Virginia. Ryan Gosling, like all the nicest people, is Canadian. And Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, is here for playing an Indian raised in Tasmania.

Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. If you kick ‘em all out, you’ll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. They gave me three seconds to say this. An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are different from us and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many, many powerful performances this year that did exactly that, breathtaking, passionate work.

There was one performance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart. Not because it was good. There was nothing good about it. But it was effective and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter, someone he outranked in privilege, power, and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it. I still can’t get it out of my head because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life.

And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life, because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing. Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. When the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.

This brings me to the press. We need the principled press to hold power to account, to call them on the carpet for every outrage.That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in our constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press and all of us in our community to join me in supporting the committee to protect journalists. Because we’re going to need them going forward. And they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.

One more thing. Once when I was standing around on the set one day whining about something, we were going to work through supper, or the long hours or whatever, Tommy Lee Jones said to me, isn’t it such a privilege, Meryl, just to be an actor. Yeah, it is. And we have to remind each other of the privilege and the responsibility of the act of empathy. We should all be very proud of the work Hollywood honors here tonight.

As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia, said to me once, take your broken heart, make it into art. Thank you.”