violence against women of color

huffingtonpost.com
Model Teddy Quinlivan comes out as transgender
She felt “a great sense of urgency” to speak out in America's current climate.

Model Teddy Quinlivan came out this week as a transgender woman, saying the current political climate inspired her to be public about her gender identity.

Now 23, Teddy says she began her transition at age 16, but has been presenting as a cisgender woman in the fashion world for fear of hurting her career. But a growing number of transgender models have paved the way for inclusion and acceptance in the industry, and she felt the time was right.

The 23-year-old Massachusetts native, who also walked for the likes of Carolina Herrera and Diane Von Furstenberg this week, said she felt “a great sense of urgency” given a recent spate of anti-trans violence, as well as the various ways in which President Donald Trump’s administration has rolled back rights for transgender Americans.

“We made an amazing progression under the Obama administration, and since the new administration took office there’s been a kind of backlash,” she said. “There’s been violence against transgender people ― particularly transgender women of color ― since before I even knew what transgender was. I’m very fortunate to be in [a] position [that] I never really thought I would be. It’s really important to take advantage of a time like this.” […]

“I think one of the ways we can help people in the trans community is to give them a platform,” she told CNN. “The fashion industry dictates what’s in fashion, what’s cool, what’s acceptable. It’s not just about who’s walking fashion shows … it’s about who’s on every newsstand in the country.”

Congratulations and thank you for this important moment, Teddy. 

“Although racism and sexism readily intersect in the lives of real people, they seldom do in feminist and antiracist practices. And so, when the practices expound identity as woman or person of color as an either/or proposition, they relegate the identity of women of color to a location that resists telling.” - Kimberlé Crenshaw (pictured above), Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color

anonymous asked:

what would you recommend reading as an intro to feminism and race theory? or Intersectionality / not White™ feminism?

off the top of my head / from my own reading list

these cut across a few different disciplines & traditions btw but I think that’s what’s called for, really

Colonize This! Young Women Of Color On Today’s Feminism — Daisy Hernandez

“As young women of color, we have both a different and similar relationship to feminism as the women in our mothers’ generation…The difference is that now we talk about these issues in women’s studies classes, in classrooms that are multicultural but xenophobic and in a society that pretends to be racially integrated but remains racially profiled.”

Redefining Realness — Janet Mock

“When I think of identity, I think of our bodies and souls and the influences of family, culture, and community - the ingredients that make us. James Baldwin describes identity as ‘the garment with which one covers the nakedness of the self.’ The garment should be worn “loose,” he says, so we can always feel our nakedness. ‘This trust in one’s nakedness is all that gives one the power to change one’s robes.’ I’m still journeying toward that place where I’m comfortable in this nakedness, standing firmly in my interlocking identities.”

Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches — Audre Lorde

“Guilt is not a response to anger; it is a response to one’s own actions or lack of action. If it leads to change then it can be useful, since it is then no longer guilt but the beginning of knowledge. Yet all too often, guilt is just another name for impotence, for defensiveness destructive of communication; it becomes a device to protect ignorance and the continuation of things the way they are, the ultimate protection for changelessness.”

Feminism Is For Everybody — bell hooks

“Simply put, feminism is a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression…Practically, it is a definition which implies that all sexist thinking and action is the problem, whether those who perpetuate it are female or male, child or adult.”

This Bridge Called My Back: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment — Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa

“We are challenging white feminists to be accountable for their racism because at the base we still want to believe that they really want freedom for all of us.”

Literally anything by Kimberlé Crenshaw, who coined the term “intersectionality” in 1989. From her article “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color”:

 “Contemporary feminist and antiracist discourses have failed to consider intersectional identities such as women of color…I consider how the experiences of women of color are frequently the product of intersecting patterns of racism and sexism, and how these experiences tend not to be represented within the discourses of either feminism or antiracism.”

Want more recs? Another Round host and glorious human Tracy Clayton compiled a list of 13 more books on feminism and intersectionality by women of color

cosmopolitan.com
Here's the Full Transcript Of Angela Davis's ~Fire~ Women's March Speech
"History cannot be deleted like web pages."

“At a challenging moment in our history, let us remind ourselves that we the hundreds of thousands, the millions of women, trans-people, men and youth who are here at the Women’s March, we represent the powerful forces of change that are determined to prevent the dying cultures of racism, hetero-patriarchy from rising again.

"We recognize that we are collective agents of history and that history cannot be deleted like web pages. We know that we gather this afternoon on indigenous land and we follow the lead of the first peoples who despite massive genocidal violence have never relinquished the struggle for land, water, culture, their people. We especially salute today the Standing Rock Sioux.

"The freedom struggles of black people that have shaped the very nature of this country’s history cannot be deleted with the sweep of a hand. We cannot be made to forget that black lives do matter. This is a country anchored in slavery and colonialism, which means for better or for worse the very history of the United States is a history of immigration and enslavement. Spreading xenophobia, hurling accusations of murder and rape and building walls will not erase history.

"No human being is illegal.

"The struggle to save the planet, to stop climate change, to guarantee the accessibility of water from the lands of the Standing Rock Sioux, to Flint, Michigan, to the West Bank and Gaza. The struggle to save our flora and fauna, to save the air—this is ground zero of the struggle for social justice.

"This is a women’s march and this women’s march represents the promise of feminism as against the pernicious powers of state violence. And inclusive and intersectional feminism that calls upon all of us to join the resistance to racism, to Islamophobia, to anti-Semitism, to misogyny, to capitalist exploitation.

"Yes, we salute the fight for 15. We dedicate ourselves to collective resistance. Resistance to the billionaire mortgage profiteers and gentrifiers. Resistance to the health care privateers. Resistance to the attacks on Muslims and on immigrants. Resistance to attacks on disabled people. Resistance to state violence perpetrated by the police and through the prison industrial complex. Resistance to institutional and intimate gender violence, especially against trans women of color.

"Women’s rights are human rights all over the planet and that is why we say freedom and justice for Palestine. We celebrate the impending release of Chelsea Manning. And Oscar López Rivera. But we also say free Leonard Peltier. Free Mumia Abu-Jamal. Free Assata Shakur.

"Over the next months and years we will be called upon to intensify our demands for social justice to become more militant in our defense of vulnerable populations. Those who still defend the supremacy of white male hetero-patriarchy had better watch out.

"The next 1,459 days of the Trump administration will be 1,459 days of resistance: Resistance on the ground, resistance in the classrooms, resistance on the job, resistance in our art and in our music.

"This is just the beginning and in the words of the inimitable Ella Baker, ‘We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes.’ Thank you.”

Kevin, “Trans with Privilege”.

“I am a doctoral fellow here at UNT, teaching in the art education program. I’m a 45-year-old man of trans experience. I used to be the director of Denton Transendence, which is a support group for trans people, family, friends, and allies, so it takes a hollistic approach to trans support.”

Could you tell me about your experience?

“Well, my book title is Trans with Privilege, and it’s one of those things I was thinking about the other day, that there’s this sort of narrative that goes around about being trans as if it’s this homogeneous experience without taking into consideration intersectionality and how privilege can happen within the trans community. I have to take into account the great privilege I have now walking through life as a heterosexual white man who’s highly educated, as opposed to friends I have who transitioned in different ways to where it actually deprivileges them. One of the young adults in my family is a trans woman, and so I have to think about even within my own family, both of our positions have shifted, with me being read as male, and my niece going from male to female. With similar family, neither of us are treated well, but even within that, they’ll be more cautious about how they disrespect me, as opposed to how they disrespect her.

Lately I’ve been reminded of this story where in 1993 my motorcycle broke down on the highway off I-35 & Rosedale in Fort Worth in the middle of the night. I had to try and find a payphone to call some friends to help me out. Walking around at that time & place, alone in the dark, as a fairly small person, being read as female, it wasn’t the safest place. When I found a payphone, I realized I had no money. I saw person coming from around the corner of an abandoned building. It was this very tall women in tall heels and a green dress, in the middle of the night, on Rosedale. Sure enough it was a sex worker, but also a trans woman of color. At the time I thought ‘I don’t want this person near me.’ I had a lot of assumptions. They asked me if I needed help, and even though I insisted I didn’t, she knew I was scared, and she even knew I was scared of her. She pulled some money out of her purse, and I was able to call my friends. I told her I was fine and she could leave, but she knew things about the area I didn’t, and wanted to make sure I was safe while I waited. When my friends pull up, I went to talk to them, and when I turn around, she was already gone. I think she was worried, knowing if I’m afraid of her, who knows what my friends are like, and there’s more of us and there’s just her. It’s interesting to think when we look at trans people, I have what’s called 'passing privilege’. Most people have no idea that I’m trans without me telling them. There are so many people who may or may not have passing privilege, which can make things dangerous, especially when sex workers are already targets for violence anyway, and the highest rates of violence are against trans women of color. We often hear about trans people as victims, and here was this woman who stepped up. Didn’t know me and made sure that I was safe.”

What were some changes in privilege you noticed before & after your transition?

“Oh wow, let’s see! I’ve been a professor for several years, and when I started to transition, I did a little experiment. I was getting emails that were really hostile over little things, and they always start with Ms, Mrs, my first name, or just Hey. They would be really demanding emails, saying 'You need to do this…’. Whatever I wrote back, no matter how professionally written, I would be perceived as a bitch. I changed my name on Blackboard, and started replying to emails as Mr. Jenkins. After about a week, even within the same semester and same group of students, about 80% of the emails changed completely in tone, saying 'Mr. Jenkins, if you get a chance…’

On the other hand, around the same time, I took a night class at TWU. I was walking along the sidewalk after class, a million things going through my head, not thinking of my surroundings, except noticing a girl walking a bit in front of me. I was only 8 months into my transition, and after 42 years of thinking I need to bundle up next to somebody at night for safety, I wasn’t thinking about how there was no one around us and I’m walking in pace right behind her. I notice her keep looking around. I thought 'I wonder why she keeps looking over her shoulder like that?’ and it suddenly hit me 'Oh my god, it’s me! I’m like the creepy guy walking too close!’ So I stopped to tie my shoes and let her go on. Those are things I had to stop being aware of. Not that I would do anything, but that’s the perception, that I could be that guy who might do something.”

4

Vivas nos queremos, by Abelardo Ojeda.

// More of my Street Photography: http://cybergus.tumblr.com

Angela Davis’ Full Speech

“At a challenging moment in our history, let us remind ourselves that we the hundreds of thousands, the millions of women, trans-people, men and youth who are here at the Women’s March, we represent the powerful forces of change that are determined to prevent the dying cultures of racism, hetero-patriarchy from rising again.

"We recognize that we are collective agents of history and that history cannot be deleted like web pages. We know that we gather this afternoon on indigenous land and we follow the lead of the first peoples who despite massive genocidal violence have never relinquished the struggle for land, water, culture, their people. We especially salute today the Standing Rock Sioux.

"The freedom struggles of black people that have shaped the very nature of this country’s history cannot be deleted with the sweep of a hand. We cannot be made to forget that black lives do matter. This is a country anchored in slavery and colonialism, which means for better or for worse the very history of the United States is a history of immigration and enslavement. Spreading xenophobia, hurling accusations of murder and rape and building walls will not erase history.

"No human being is illegal.

"The struggle to save the planet, to stop climate change, to guarantee the accessibility of water from the lands of the Standing Rock Sioux, to Flint, Michigan, to the West Bank and Gaza. The struggle to save our flora and fauna, to save the air—this is ground zero of the struggle for social justice.

"This is a women’s march and this women’s march represents the promise of feminism as against the pernicious powers of state violence. And inclusive and intersectional feminism that calls upon all of us to join the resistance to racism, to Islamophobia, to anti-Semitism, to misogyny, to capitalist exploitation.

"Yes, we salute the fight for 15. We dedicate ourselves to collective resistance. Resistance to the billionaire mortgage profiteers and gentrifiers. Resistance to the health care privateers. Resistance to the attacks on Muslims and on immigrants. Resistance to attacks on disabled people. Resistance to state violence perpetrated by the police and through the prison industrial complex. Resistance to institutional and intimate gender violence, especially against trans women of color.

"Women’s rights are human rights all over the planet and that is why we say freedom and justice for Palestine. We celebrate the impending release of Chelsea Manning. And Oscar López Rivera. But we also say free Leonard Peltier. Free Mumia Abu-Jamal. Free Assata Shakur.

"Over the next months and years we will be called upon to intensify our demands for social justice to become more militant in our defense of vulnerable populations. Those who still defend the supremacy of white male hetero-patriarchy had better watch out.

"The next 1,459 days of the Trump administration will be 1,459 days of resistance: Resistance on the ground, resistance in the classrooms, resistance on the job, resistance in our art and in our music.

"This is just the beginning and in the words of the inimitable Ella Baker, ‘We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes.’ Thank you.”

anonymous asked:

hey no shade but how would you improve coercive systems? I've never heard anyone make the points you did, and I guess I'm pretty confused? what's so bad about cats for prisoners?

The bad thing isn’t cats for prisoners. Cats are cute!

The bad thing is prisons. Prisons don’t work, don’t make us safer and are really about controlling the population because the State would rather prosecure thieves than fix poverty, would rather lock up a fraction of rapists than fix sexism, would rather lock up people of color for minor drug offenses than fix racism, etc. Prisons don’t make our society safer, they just make the people in power safer because it’s something they can use against us when we get weird ideas about having a right to real freedom from their rule. 

Communities where there is justice and freedom from need are perfectly capable of solving disputes and harmful behaviour without relying on punishment. There has already been a lot of writing on this so there’s some stuff below. 

So about cats:

When there are projects like cats for prisoners, art for prisoners, theatre for prisoners, I’m generally happy that prisoners are getting one less crappy thing in their life. But the way they are presented are as things that will make the existence of prison okay. They’re not. No amount of cute cats and art programs will change a prison into a helpful institution. They’re still places that disappear human beings rather than fix societies’ problems. 

What’s more, these projects are almost always immediately used as another form of coercion. Prisoners don’t get a cat, period. They get a cat as long as they behave the way the prison wants and that cat can be taken away as punishment. It’s just one more way of controlling people. 

In the end these projects are not really about helping prisoners at all, they’re about us who read the news articles. They’re about maintaining the lie that prisons are humane places with a few minor flaws that can be reformed. They’re absolutely not. We don’t need prison reform, we need prison abolition. 

Reading list: (and some stuff to watch)

(Source: http://kinkykinkshamer.tumblr.com/post/69512975149/prison-abolition-resources)

chrysanthedads  asked:

your makeup posts are the best, i need moreee--do you have any more further readings?

Thank you! 

Here’s some interesting texts on feminism, in my opinion. For those who have been following me for a while, these might be a bit redundant, as I’ve already mentioned them in the past and I only add new ones as my studies go on. Some of these are in French. Most are accessible online. 

I don’t have anything on makeup and corporate feminism in particular except Gengler (yet?), it’s a fairly new subject, but I would be interested in researching it. If anyone has some input about it, please feel free to add something!

Keep reading

As many people in NYC fawn over the NYPD’s participation in Pride events, we cannot forget the dangers that one of the biggest military forces poses to Black communities. In standing with BLM-Toronto, we must call to awareness the hyper-militarization of local police. Along with such awareness, we must stomach the death of Mx Bostick; a Black trans woman murdered here in NYC this past spring. We must acknowledge the daily taunting and threat to trans women of color as they ride the train. We must remember that Islan Nettles’ head was bashed into the sidewalk just outside of Precinct 147 in Harlem after a coward realized she was a trans woman.

We know that 92% of those arrested for fare beating are Black & Brown folks, and we have accounts of how trans women, who are among the most impoverished communities, are treated by the NYPD for something as simple as not having $2.75 for public transportation. This is what has led us to work with others in New York City in organizing our #SwipeitForward campaign. We connect the increase in violence against trans women of color to the deaths of Black immigrants like David Felix, murdered by an NYPD detective and his body not claimed for 21-days. We see all of those issues, happening here locally, as a reflection of the racist, transphobic, and homophobic rhetoric we have spewing from those as high up as the White House.
We call for #SafetyBeyondPolicing.

We have witnessed the shutdowns that occurred from our comrades at Pride’s this year in Washington D.C. and Los Angeles. However, understanding the reality of organizing in NYC — where activists are under unconstitutional surveillance — we could not ask Black people and non-Black POCs who are most marginalized to risk their safety on a day where they should be celebrating. The NYPD has one of the most expensive budgets in the world standing at $4.8-billion a year. We cannot help but wonder what would society look like if NYC were to divest in predatory policing and invest in the communities where that funding is needed most. Instead of paying for generators that beam into the windows of public housing apartments every single night of the year, funds could be used to increase resident associations in all 334 NYCHA buildings. Regardless of the announcement of Rikers closing, instead of Rikers housing more mentally ill persons than the psychiatric hospitals in the state, NYPD funds could hire over 2,000 social workers or special education teachers.

Being the two leading corporate sponsors, T-Mobile and Walmart could start this process by reinvesting the $1.7-million spent in sponsoring NYC Pride into reparations for families like the ones of David Felix and Delrawn Dempsey Small whose anniversary of his murder is approaching in two weeks.. The companies could support the local borough Prides that are led by Black & Brown organizers, often with little to no budget, in order to provide a safe-space for people of color. We challenge NYC Pride organizers to see how allowing police to carry weapons, barricade the people on this one day they get to be joyful, and closing off the Christopher Street Pier has left those who are in most need of these spaces in deficiency.
We call on you to #FreeThePier.

And still we know that our people require moments and days like this in order to nourish their spirits and be around their own community. This is why we are amplifying the following events happening this Pride Sunday, June 25, 2017:
Biggest Baddiest Blackitiest Blanket on da Beach
The Wetter the Better: Queer NYC Pride at Riis Beach
4th Annual Black Queer and Here Potluck Picnic
Pride (and) JOY. A Day Party In Brooklyn: Special Edition
The She Party: Pride Edition

In general we ask that those who believe #BlackLivesMatter, stand in solidarity with us in our demands. If you stand with #BlackLivesMatter, then we must not let borders stop us from seeing the damage of anti-blackness to our communities. If you stand with #BlackLivesMatter, be present to all Black lives — transgender, queer, non-binary, HIV, gay, lesbian, or cis-gender including those living with HIV/AIDS. We wish for all persons to not only be represented, but safe and empowered in their celebration of existence at any Pride.
We can no longer support spaces where a force that can kill us, with impunity, is allowed to patrol a day of celebration. We are here for Pride, but not like this.

This summer, trans activist and Human Rights Campaign National Press Secretary Sarah McBride became the first openly transgender person to speak at a major political party convention. In her remarks, Sarah called for the passage of the Equality Act, preventing violence against trans women of color, and ending the HIV and AIDS epidemic once and for all. Join Sarah and activists across the country in supporting LGBT rights this November.

How can one expect the state to solve the problem of violence against women, when it constantly recapitulates its own history of colonialism, racism, and war? How can we ask the state to intervene when, in fact, its armed forces have always practiced sexual and intimate violence against women as a central military tactic of war and domination?
—  Angela Davis, The Color of Violence Against Women
The problem with identity politics is not that it fails to transcend difference, as some critics charge, but rather the opposite - that it frequently conflates or ignores intragroup differences. In the context of violence against women, this elision of difference in identity politics is problematic, fundamentally because of the violence that many women experience is often shaped by other dimensions of their identities, such as race and class. Moreover, ignoring difference within groups contributes to tension among groups, another problem of identity politics that bears on efforts to politicize violence against women. Feminist efforts to politicize experiences of women and antiracist efforts to politicize experiences of people of color have frequently proceeded as though the issues and experiences they each detail occur on mutually exclusive terrains. Although racism and sexism readily intersect in the lives of real people, they seldom do in feminist and antiracist practices. And so, when the practices expound identity as woman or person of color as an either/or proposition, they relegate the identity of women of color to a location that resists telling.
—  Kimberle Crenshaw, “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color” (Stanford Law Review, vol. 43:1241, July 1991). 
drive.google.com
{Black} Feminist Theory and Praxis II.pdf - Google Drive

The mock syllabus I made for a final project of my capstone independent study for Gender Studies. 

Look through. I have all of the readings on pdf except for any of the Joy James, Holland, and Sharpe readings. Everything else, including Sula, I have on pdf. DM me if you want any of them :) Readings can be found on page 5. 

This course is intended to provide students with a deeper look in to what is often known as “Black Feminism”. The removal of the qualifier from the title of this class is intentional; the need to put Black Feminist Theory (as opposed to what presently stands) walks the tenuous line between self-definition and further marginalization. In this course we will explore the meaning of Black Feminism/Womanism and the importance of such identifiers, while also acknowledging and critiquing the ways in which the Academy appropriates and others Black thought.

Students will be immersed in Black Feminist thought that follows the genealogy of slavery to present day “post-racial” society. While the majority of the work will be coming directly from Black Feminist scholars and other scholars of color, there will be an implicit critique of the way in which (White)-Feminism has worked to silence and dismiss Black experiences.

This course is not centered on empty criticisms of mainstream—academic feminism (read: White), but rather is dedicated to the greater feminist mission of critiquing and dismantling all systems of domination. Students will be actively engaging in understanding the explicit and insidious ways in which the systems of domination operate in order to oppress and destroy.

Feminist Theory and Praxis II will be run as an upper-level seminar. With this format the lecturing will be kept to a minimum with a heavier emphasis on total class participation in discussion. Because of this, preparation and active engagement is key in order to guarantee an ideal classroom dynamic and learning environment. Students are expected to not only deeply engage with the work and class discussions but to also regularly engage in self-reflection of their social-positionality, motives, and behaviors inside and outside of Academia.

anonymous asked:

So I'd love to get your take on the trans argument that claiming a "universal/monolithic" patriarchy based on biology is "colonialist." It's true that white male/female gender relations have a specific kind of hierarchy that is usually trumpeted as the norm by some radfems and that's inaccurate, but I am just baffled at how to respond to people that think white people are just sitting here *projecting* patriarchy onto other cultures to (somehow??) exclude trans folk.

My take is that this argument is fucking bullshit.  It is infuriating to me how transactivists appropriate the oppression of people of color to use as fucking stamps in their oppression passports without any acknowledgement or awareness of the material conditions of race.  It is reductionist, and fucked up and ya know what?  

The definition of colonialism is simple:  the practice of domination, which involves the subjugation of one people to another.   Patriarchy is males practicing colonialism over females.  It is that simple.  That domination is enforced through the subjugation of female biology.  I don’t even understand how that can be rationally contested.

If someone truly believes that females are not subjugated to males—on the BASIS OF THEIR BIOLOGY—in every country around the globe then they are living with their heads tucked firmly into their assholes.  They are denying the oppression of millions of people; that erases that suffering.  It says that the specificity of oppression that females due to actions, laws, and rules put in place specifically by males to dominate over female biology (FGM, female infanticide, forced feedings, bride burning, honor killing, breast ironing, menstrual shaming, and selective abortion) is irrelevant.  That it does not exist.  It insinuates that the levels of oppression carried out through these means can be accepted as “normal” for those cultures, which is deeply insulting.  It basically sanctions the domination and oppression those females face.  To assert that patriarchy only affects white, Western people is LITERALLY enacting a colonialist belief.

Ironically, these are the same people who will argue with a straight face that we cannot talk about these things because “they don’t affect people in the West.”  They’ll say that bringing it up to show how patriarchy solely affects females is appropriation of experiences that we don’t have

Got that?  If you talk about the global domination by males of female biology at all, you are a racist.  If you name the global domination by males of female biology patriarchy, you are a colonialist.  

Do you see how this has NOTHING to do with an actual political struggle to liberate a group of people?  Do you see how this is all about preventing females from seeing each other as a class and preventing them literally from having the language to consciousness raise across borders and speak their own oppression?   

And what it actually shows is that these jackalopes know NOTHING about brown feminisms in the US or globally, which is deeply insulting to reality and to the work of the many feminists of color who have devoted their academic lives to dismantling this bullshit.  I also wonder if anyone claiming this has spent ANY time around brown cultures?  I doubt it seriously.  Have they spent ANY time reading the work of feminists of color?!  Non-western feminist writings?

Bell Hooks:

One evening my brother was given permission by Dad to bring out the tin of marbles. Iannounced my desire to play and was told bymy brother that “girls did not play with marbles,”that it was a boy’s game. This made no sense to my four- or five-year-old mind, and I insisted on my right to play by picking up marbles and shooting them. Dad intervened to tell me to stop. I did not listen. His voice grew louder and louder. Then suddenly he snatched me up, broke a board from our screen door, and began to beat me with it, telling me, “You’re just a little girl. When I tell you to do something, I mean for you to do it.” He beat me and he beat me, wanting me to acknowledge that I understood what I had done. His rage, his violence captured everyone’s attention. Our family sat spellbound, rapt before the pornography of patriarchal violence. After this beating I was banished—forced to stay alone in the dark. Mama came into the bedroom to soothe the pain, telling me in her soft southern voice, “I tried to warn you. You need to accept that you are just a little girl and girls can’t do what boys do.” In service to patriarchy her task was to reinforce that Dad had done the right thing by, putting me in my place, by restoring the natural social order. I remember this traumatic event so well because it was a story told again and again within our family. No one cared that the constant retelling might trigger post-traumatic stress; the retelling was necessary to reinforce both the message and the remembered state of absolute powerlessness. The recollection of this brutal whipping of a little-girl daughter by a big strong man, served as more than just a reminder to me of my gendered place, it was a reminder to everyone watching/remembering, to all my siblings, male and female, and to our grownwoman mother that our patriarchal father was the ruler in our household. We were to remember that if we did not obey his rules, we would be punished, punished even unto death. This is the way we were experientially schooled in the art of patriarchy.

Kimberle Crenshaw (yanno, the one who created modern understandings of INTERSECTIONALITY, which these transactivists fully fail to understand doesn’t mean trans women are more oppressed than anyone else alive on the planet):

My objective here is to advance the telling of that location by exploring the race and gender dimensions of violence against women of color. Contemporary feminist and antiracist discourses have failed to consider the intersections of racism and patriarchy. Focusing on two dimensions of male violence against women-battering and rape-I consider how the experiences of women of color are frequently the product of intersecting patterns of racism and sexism, and how these experiences tend not to be represented within the discourse of either feminism or antiracism. Because of their intersectional identity as both women and people of color within discourses that are shaped to respond to one or the other, the interests and experiences of women of color are frequently marginalized within both.

Vahida Nainar has written beautifully about patriarchy in South Asia.  

Jessie Kabwila-Kapasula, a Malawian feminist, has addressed this issue within a pan-African context.  

Listening to voices of the actual women themselves, could be of great helpful. Fortunately, African literature provides a channel that directly links one with African women writers. Their work is credible because they are increasingly using the self referentiality technique in their narratives. It is for that reason that this paper engages the narratives of Adichie and Dangarembga. This talk will focus on Purple Hibiscus and Nervous Conditions. I argue that Adichie and Dangarembga portrayal of African female oppression calls for a classed, anti and decolinised reading of the African woman question. Their portrayal of the oppression of the African woman centers on patriarchy, globalizing and glocalising it as a complex and fluid concept, one that mutates and reinvents itself when need be.

I am not even close to being done but I can’t be here all night on this tip. But please see the work of Latinas from South and Central America (specifically work about the Juarez femicide).  

The fact is, white people clearly have projected their very particular brand of patriarchy on other cultures through imperialism.  That is very true.  What all of these societies were doing BEFORE the arrival of people may have looked very, different.  I am sure some were matriarchal.  I am sure some were without gender.  But we are now living in a world where patriarchy based on a European model has been exported throughout the world.  Where almost every culture has been touched by these plumes of domination.  

To deny this basic fact is insulting.  It is just insulting.  It doesn’t make sense and it isn’t supported if one takes even minimal effort to interrogate the world and people around them.

Lesbian feminists did the work and the word. We took the potluck to new levels; most nights of the week, on Saturday mornings, Sunday afternoons at meetings and on projects. At fundraising events for those projects. At the proof-reading and lay-out meeting. After an afternoon of wrapping and trips to the post office with scores of parcels among you in somebody’s old VW or Corolla. The lesbian-feminist theater group, the tickets, the box office, the folding chairs, the posters, the feeding of the cast and crew; the film set in someone’s loft with 20 volunteers on hand to make up, dress, direct, film, feed the cast and crew; the lesbian-led national conference on violence against women of color on a frayed shoe string budget and women from all over the country and the world come – at their own expense or ours; the anti-apartheid publication on an equally frayed budget under the aegis of a lesbian editorship; the all-volunteer lesbian health fair; at the weekend-long board retreat, where we supplied the food and cooked it too. Lesbian feminism put our feminist messages out to our constituencies – other lesbians, women identified women, gay women of color and “women for whom relationships with women are an essential part of their lives.” Lesbians of African descent were/are everywhere. Women of color sometimes code for “lesbians of color” were/are everywhere. Lesbians of all colors worked very hard to produce for our imagined audiences. We claimed and challenged our masculinity, femininity, blackness, whiteness as well as our androgyny and hybridity, liminality and marginality. We produced politics and culture for us, by us, about us.

honestly its suchhhhhh a pattern in social justice movements (and i say this for lack of a better catch-all term) for leaders to attempt to underscore the significance of an issue specifically by diverting it away from the preexisting cultural notions of the issue as it was experienced by black people and the terrible political and social suffering imposed on black people because of those notions.

and not to say that its bad that these tropes are being combated, because itd be great if they actually were ! but all thats happening is that these social justice authority figures are just trying to suspend peoples disbelief that its not exclusively a black issue (in a bad way) long enough to open their minds to the possibility of political actions towards an exclusively white end.

two examples cross my mind atm. first is kimberle crenshaws discussion of domestic violence in anti-racist and anti-sexist political movements. (this quote is from her article “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color”, in the subsection entitled Race and the domestic violence lobby.)

Yet these comments seem less concerned with exploring domestic abuse within “stereotyped” communities than with removing the stereotype as an obstacle to exposing battering within white middle- and upper-class communities.
[…]
While it is unlikely that advocates and others who adopt this rhetorical strategy intend to exclude or ignore the needs of poor and colored women, the underlying premise of this seemingly univeralistic appeal is to keep the sensibilities of dominant social groups focused on the experiences of those groups.

my second example is assemblywoman Diana Richardson’s recent statement in the new york state assembly regarding drug justice / treatment. (the video can be found here, but it doesnt catch all of it sadly.) her anger is absolutely justified; drug laws have terrorized the black communities around new york for decades, but only when an “other demographic” is experiencing “drug problems” is it treated with care. even worse, theres no retroactive care, no reparations, no acquittals, no compassion for the communities and families and individuals torn apart because of oppressive drug policies. at the end of the video, assemblywoman richardson hits the mark when she criticizes not the fact that others are getting compassionate treatment, but that that compassion is at the expense of black people that were given no such mercy.

a new brand of political compassion that lacks a “restorative justice”, as assemblywoman richardson calls, it for those that have been cruelly and unusually punished in the past is not proper compassion, and a new brand of political compassion that only functions on the exclusion of those that have always suffered the most is not proper compassion.

Contemporary feminist and antiracist discourses have failed to consider intersectional identities… I consider how the experiences of women of color are frequently the product of intersecting patterns of racism and sexism, and how these experiences tend not to be represented within the discourses of either feminism or antiracism.
—  Kimberlé Crenshaw, ‘Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color’