vinyl at the hi fi

people say a lotta shit about hi fi this and vinyl that well I’m here to tell you the only way to actually appreciate a song is to listen to the original followed by three different nightcore versions (each incrementally faster than the last) then a remix thats just pitched down nightcore then the original song. dont fucking talk to me if you don’t do this for every single goddamn song youve ever heard.

10

8-TRACK TAPES

Part One

Ridiculed today as the essence of obsolescence, the clunky, primitive 8-track tape brought about a social change of the same magnitude as the epochal Supreme Court decisions and the counterculture movement of the 1960s.

The 8-track tape, introduced in 1965, consisted of an endless loop of standard ¼-inch magnetic tape, housed in a plastic cartridge. On the tape were eight parallel soundtracks, corresponding to four stereo programs. Although it was developed by Learjet for aviation playback, the technology became an instant success when auto makers began installing tape decks in cars. Prior to the 8-track tape, music playback at home was limited to vinyl records, expensive reel-to-reel decks and the radio,and, in the car, to AM radio only. The easy-to-use, self-activating decks and small, lightweight cartridges for the first time allowed the driver, and not the radio station, to choose the music, thus insuring the format’s success. The popularity of the system encouraged the rapid development of 8-track tape components for home stereos, capable of recording and playback, making it possible for listeners to access their music on a single, portable format, at home and in the car. With its ease of use and flexibility, the 8-track tape quickly overtook the sale of large, heavy, fragile,vinyl records, to become the largest segment of the retail music market in the early 1970s.

To be sure, 8-track tapes had their drawbacks. While the self-playing, endless-loop required no attention while driving, it could not be fast-forwarded, rewound or cued, only played through. To hear a certain song, one had to listen the entire track. Fitting the 10-12 songs of an album into the tape’s four 10-minutes segments meant that the track order of vinyl recordings was not respected (a huge problem for albums without breaks between tracks like Dark Side of the Moon or clear narratives like Tommy). The most egregious offense was the sometimes-unavoidable splitting of longer songs between two tracks, which entailed a fade-out mid-song, a long silence followed by the tape head (loudly) shifting to the next track and then a fade-in to the rest of the song. Serious audiophiles and fans stuck with vinyl.

Inferior in sound quality but capable of rewinding and allowing for a kind of random access, cassette tapes replaced 8-tracks in the early 1980s. While the tapes are now emblems of the past-ness of the 1970s, the 8-track inaugurated the era of portability, multi-platform capability, and, most importantly, personal choice in music–the basic functionalities we expect all devices to provide. Modern consciousness radically differs from that of even 50 years ago because we now have life-long, always available, highly-personalized soundtracks running constantly and shaping our days. We may have different equipment but we still inhabit the 8-track conceptual framework.

anonymous asked:

Good morning. I noticed that Harry's album was recorded with split audio - different audio in the left and right. Sorry, I don't know the technical term for it. I know this was very common in the 60s & 70s, so not surprising he would use the technique, but it it used commonly now it is this unique for the time? Thank you for your insight. 💖

Hi!

I haven’t had the chance to listen carefully with headphones, so I can’t tell you what I hear on specific songs, but here’s a brief answer, and I will come back again once I’ve heard the songs on headphones.

So, in audiophile terms (at least from my limited knowledge), the reason for splitting the sound between right and left is to image the sound.

High fidelity equipment, with high fidelity audio playback equipment, needs to have the proper room diffusing/ insulation and the proper speaker placements. When one plays the music recorded in a live venue, and with split audio, one can hear the music as if it’s being played in a three-dimensional space. The physics take a bit of time to explain, but it has to do with the pure diffusion of sound from dipole speakers and the way sound waves propagate and cancel each other out in an insulated space. When you go to concert halls and see baffles hung from the ceiling or walls, they are diffusing the sound.

You can actually hear where each musician is standing in the room, like ghost images. Harry in front, guitarist to the right, drummer in back and so forth.

It’s actually eerie to hear music played back like that– like you are in the room with the musicians. It’s a sound hologram– almost as if you can touch them.

Pop is almost NEVER recorded like this. First, the voices are often recorded on a separate track, tuned and then mixed back with the instrumentals. Second, pop uses a lot of electronic effects that are not recorded acoustically but are produced digitally. EDM is almost all digital sound effects. Digitally recorded sound are not placeable, because it isn’t mic’d and doesn’t obey the physics of sound. Listen to any 1980’s Madonna recording and you’ll hear how flat it is.

Jazz is almost always recorded like this. Jazz is recorded as an acoustic ensemble with usually two or three microphones, and imaging can be amazing.

Imaging is best with music that uses little electronic processing– songs with acoustic guitars will image better than songs with electric guitars, for instance.

To get the best sound, you want the best recording medium.

Audiophiles argue, but it’s now agreed that SACDs (high memory capacity CDs) have the same ability to capture high fidelity sound as vinyl. But for decades, vinyl was the medium of choice because most CDs compressed sound (to fit data onto discs). There’s also something about vinyl sound that is warmer and rounder than digital sound, although I’ve done a few blinded hearing tests with high fidelity equipment that showed no difference to me.

If you have the luxury of a high fidelity system, play your vinyl record, and then find the sweet spot to sit and listen (usually in a room, there is only one sweet spot). Again, this is my limited experience.

One way you can do this is to bring your CD or vinyl to a store that sells hi fi equipment– find a store in a big city that has an insulated auditioning room with speakers that cost $10,000 per pair and up. That’s the kind of snobby, esoteric store you want. They will have a system that costs over $50k, and then you can ask to pop in your Pink Album (these stores sell $3k CD players and turntables with cartridges that cost more than $3k, so your CD or vinyl will be well cared for). These rooms sound as if you’re dead, because you literally cannot hear any echoes. The sales people are usually pretty nice. Ask to sit or stand in the sweet spot; they’ll know what you’re talking about. Then enjoy to your heart’s content. You might have the perfect listening experience, Harry and his band playing for you in a private performance, close enough to touch.

Addendum: I will add if I hear specific details about the songs. A friend told me that “From the Dining Table” has Harry singing from two different locations, right and left. I’ll have to listen for the artistic reason for this choice. Thanks.