vintage eclectic

10

Luca Guadagnino’s home outside of Milan

The ultimate set of Italian film maker Luca Guadagnino is own apartment. It is housed in a 17th-century palazzo and plays out all his aesthetics: atmospheric spaces where contrasts coexist harmoniously (like modern Danish chairs in a room with doors lavishly embellished in the Lombardian Baroque style). The renovation has uncovered frescoes and every original elements has been preserved.

9

Carlo Prada’s home

Journalist and art collector Carlo Prada lives in Milan. His apartment, housed in period building, has two different souls: the atmosphere of traditional spaces, defined by original stucco ceilings and carved parquet, and the contemporary feel with new more fluid environments and new areas highlighted by concrete floors in the shade of Gio Ponti light blue. The apartment was renovated by architect Hans Peer who created a perfect balance between past and present: classic heritage, modern elements, contemporary art and masterpieces of design. 

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Palazzo Fendi and Fendi Private Suites, Rome.

The Italian fashion house Fendi restored its Palace in Rome and opened there its first luxury hotel-Fendi Private Suites- and a roof restaurant. Downstairs, the 17th-century palazzo was completely refurbished by French architect Gwenael Nicolasseven and includes an atelier where clients can even watch the artisans at work. Designed by DimoreStudio, the second floor features the privee Fendi VIP Apartment, a luxurious private and exclusive space to welcome and host FENDI’s top clients. According to DimoreStudio aesthetics, its style turns out dramatically sophisticated, with a highly curated mix of vintage classics, contemporary design and art pieces: pastel sage and dove colored lacquered walls, baby green paint and dark blue silk fabric wall-coverings, the striking bookcase made from lacquered metal and colored cathedral glass, brass touches, the soaring ceilings and the molded boiserie set a refined yet warm and intimate mood. The 7 room hotel is hidden discreetly on the third floor of this brand’s flagship store Palace and was designed by Italian architect Marco Costanzi, who created a stylish but subtle ambience, using  blood-red Lepanto marble and white travertine, custom-designed furnishings from Fendi Casa, Jan Kath carpets and Giò Ponti mirrors. Up above on the fourth floor Rainer Becker‘s upscale Japanese restaurant chain, Zuma, has opened its first Italian location.

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In Milan, in the former industrial district of Via Savona, the loft -home and workshop- of Antonino Sciortino.

As he defines himself, the creative artisan Antonino Sciortino, lives and works  in this stunning converted space immersed in greenery. The two-floor loft is hidden behind a corten sheet that leads to an astonishing garden, with jasmines, medlar trees, pots of huge cacti and tropical plants, and colored iron furniture, made by the blacksmith -artist. The living room is flooded with light from the large windows and, on the concrete floor, customized furniture is combined with design icons, such as Castiglioni’s Arco lamp and Eames’ Lounge Chair and vintage pieces. The  staircase is an aerial structure that fits the environment as a sculpture: suspended from the ceiling by thin iron rods, it is made with steps created by retrieving the wood of an old mahogany table. Recently the loft has been renovated and reduced to obtain another apartment: form the maxi space of the past, the current versionmturns out smaller, more private and intimate.

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A loft apartment and studio in Berlin 

Designed by Annabelle Kutucu, the loft is characterized by industrial elements -that are preserved from the original architecture of the building-, combined with classic features, such as Herringbone flooring, and modern and vintage pieces. Neutral tones are juxtaposed against black accents creating a harmonious contrast.