vintage african photography

2

COUTURE CLASH - models: Kiara Kabukuru, Ling Tan & Debra Shaw - photographer: Peter Lindbergh - fashion editor/stylist: Grace Coddington - hair: Odie Gilbert - makeup: Stephane Marais - Vogue April 1997

featured designer: Christian Dior by John Galliano1998 Collection

Beni Amer Boy

Growing up as kid, it seemed like every Eritrean household in the diaspora had this boy’s image on their wall. His inviting smile; his big pearly whites; his mud-stiffened ringlets hairdo known as the tiffa and tribal scars on his cheeks made him a memorable face. Although no one knows his name for certain, he does have a few aliases Eritreans commonly refer to him by, including Beni-Amer boy and smiling boy.

So who is he?

Despite being one of the most recognized images among Eritreans, we still don’t know much about him. All we know is this iconic picture was taken in 1965 by James P. Blair, a retired National Geographic photographer. We also know the picture was shot in Tesseney, Eritrea, a mid-size town near the Sudanese border. Aside from these few facts, there isn’t much information to go on.

Judging by the boy’s face, he seems to be between 14-16 years of age when Mr. Blair took his picture. Since the image was taken 48 years ago, this would make him around 62-64 years old today, assuming he’s still alive, of course. While this information is nice to know, it still doesn’t give inklings about his personal life. Unfortunately, we are still left with rumors to fill this void.

Rumors

Lack of information about people usually results in rumors. Among the most entertaining ones about him is he was allegedly given a modeling job by Crest, a toothpaste company based in America. Another one of my favorites is a French model tourist visiting Tesseney was struck by his good looks and married him and took him to Paris with her. Perhaps the most plausible rumor is he allegedly joined the Eritrean Revolution and was martyred in the late 1960s.

Controversy

Since Ethiopia annexed Eritrea in 1962, National Geographic presented him to the world as an Ethiopian boy. Additionally, the Ethiopian tourist agencies during the Haile Selassie and Mengistu Haile Mariam administrations used his image extensively to promote Ethiopian tourism. As a result, he became well known among Ethiopians, too. Even today, his image can be seen in many Ethiopian restaurants and households.

Beni-Amers

The Beni-Amers, who are generally classified as the largest subgroup within the Tigre ethnic group, are named after Amer Ibn Kunnu, a 15th century CE founder of the clan. In fact, their name literally means “sons of Amer”. They live mostly in south west Eritrea and around the Eritrean-Sudanese border. Although their original language was Bedawi (Beja/Hidareb), today they speak Tigre as their first language.

Harvey and Catherine Robinson,(née Jones) on their wedding day, September 6, 1957, pictured with Elizabeth and Clarence Jones. Photo courtesy of Robinson family. 

When I look at this photo of my parents on their wedding day, there is only one word that comes to mind…

truth.

See, for me, this photo represents everything that is not readily shown in the media: Black couples who got married years ago and are still married today. For me, the truth of this photo is that my four siblings and I have watched our parents remain together through sickness and in health, and for richer and for poorer.  And five children, nine grandchildren, one great grandson and almost 60 years later, my siblings and I also know that only death will do them part.

I once heard someone say that black love is revolutionary, and in a world where it seems so many outside forces are tearing up black families, the fact that my parents have managed to stay together so long is revolutionary indeed. 

So yeah, this photo is proof that black love is beautiful, but more than that, for me, it’s proof that black love is the truth.

Story from Geveryl Robinson