villanovan

Why is a School Paper Parroting Mega-Stunt Talking Points?

The Villanovan

  • Styles was not alone however, and arrived with an impressive posse, including an unknown companion he seemed particularly close with. “It appeared as though he was with a friend who was from around the area and she brought him to try cheesesteaks,” said Iezzi. Oh hey Xander.
  • Harris has followed One Direction’s successes since 2011 and has a particular partiality for the long-locked frontman. “I like how kind and generous he is. Everyone thinks he’s a stuckup playboy but I disagree. He once spent his day off in Los Angeles giving out pizza to homeless people.”  Harry is not a manwhore. He’s kind and generous.
  • Some even took the opportunity to publicly question the legitimacy of the band’s achievements. A source that chose to remain anonymous remarked that, “[One Direction’s] music isn’t exceptional. It’s the same old recycled pop music from four, semi-attractive boys. The most attractive one’s gone.” he went on to comment that Zayn, the band member who departed from the group this past March was “easily the most attractive” and was, “scary in a sexy way.”  If you’d like to know about how Scary Sexy Spice is transcending boyband life, his Interview magazine cover just hit today. How convenient.
  • Though opinions regarding Styles and his career differ, that his presence was felt beyond the walls of Campus Corner is undeniable. Once word spread of his visit, mobs of young women, many of them Villanovan students, swarmed to the restaurant to see if they could catch a glimpse of the British icon. “There are girls crying out in front of the store,” Iezzi commented after Style’s departure. Don’t get it twisted though, Harry Styles is still that bitch. Girls are crying, dammit.
  • Though much of the speculation of his appearance has been resolved, many questions still remain. Why didn’t he go to Philadelphia to try a Philly Cheesesteak? Did he enjoy it or were his foreign taste buds not properly equipped to handle such a classic American dish? If his “friend” really is from the area, can we expect a Villanova reference in the next 1D album, a la Drake’s “DnF”? Riddle us this, readers: why is Harry Styles stuntin’ at Villanova? Trying to appeal to a slighty older demographic perhaps? What’s Xander got to do with Harry’s current narrative? Is a “soft” outing on the way? Friendly reminder, the 5th album is coming. Stay tuned…

None of this was coincidental or accidental. This was the incoming team 100%. They knew the fandom would find this. And what a clever way to reinforce their current narratives. Because on this surface this all looks relatively organic.

But make no mistake, there is a clear agenda here:

  • 1. Kill the boyband thing. 
  • 2. Notice Xander dammit. Yes, we’re going somewhere with this. 
  • 3. Harry is not the hetero tramp 1DHQ has portrayed him to be. He has depth. 
  • 4. College chicks (i.e, older) dig Harry. 
  • 5. College chicks (i.e., older) really dig Zayn. 
  • 6. Please pay attention to OUR narratives.
  • 7. Buy 1D’s 5th album, coming soon.

Villanovan Bronze Votive Hands, c. 7th Century BC

Villanovan culture was an  Early Iron Age culture in Italy, named after the village of Villanova, near Bologna, where in 1853 the first of the characteristic cemeteries was found. The Villanovan people branched from the Urnfield culture of eastern Europe and appeared in Italy during the 10th or 9th century BC.  The Villanovan people were a society of warrior-farmers living in small hut-villages. Their control of mines, metal ore and their expertise in metallurgy are all hallmarks of this era.

Votive items such as these may have been used at cult healing sanctuaries as an offering to cure a particular ailment or given in gratitude after a malady had healed. Votives in bronze are a rarer find since metal was more expensive than the common terracotta alternative.

Today on Clio Ancient Art:  Villanovan Impasto Ware Vessel
CULTURE / REGION OF ORIGIN: Villanovan Culture, Italy (Northern Lazio or Southern Etruria))
DATE:  8th – 7th Century BC
LINK: http://www.clioancientart.com/catalog/i41.html
DIMENSIONS: Maximum height with handle 11 cm (4.3 in.); maximum width 13.1 cm (5.1 in.); rim diameter 12.0 cm (4.7 in.)
PROVENANCE: Formerly in the collection of Lord Dayton of Corran, the collection formed between 1960 and 2000.
PUBLISHED: Ex Bonhams, ANTIQUITIES, 27 April 2006, London, Page 160, illustrated in color on Page 159.

SPECIAL NOTES: The Etruscan civilization of Italy has its immediate roots in the Villanovan culture of west central Italy; an area open to influences from Greek and Carthaginian colonists and traders and northern European Celtic cultures. The Villanovan culture, centered in a broad area around the modern city of Bologna,     rapidly developed from simple agricultural village life to a more socially stratified and technologically sophisticated society. The Etruscan cities of the following centuries grew directly out of Villanovan town foundations.This large, beautiful, highly polished pottery vessel offers a glimpse forward to the sohpisticated Etruscan Impasto and Bucchero wares of the 7th and 6th Centuries BC

Bronze crested helmet

Villanovan period

Italy

9th Century BC

The Villanovan culture was the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy, abruptly following the Bronze Age Terramare culture and giving way in the 7th century BC to an increasingly orientalizing culture influenced by Greek traders, which was followed without a severe break by the Etruscan civilization. The Villanovan culture and people branched from the Urnfield culture of Eastern Europe. The Villanovans introduced iron-working to the Italian peninsula; they practiced cremation and buried the ashes of their dead in pottery urns of distinctive double-cone shape.

Source: Metropolitan Museum

Villanovan Bronze Crested Helmet, c. 900 BC

The Villanovan culture was the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy, abruptly following the Bronze Age Terramare culture and giving way in the 7th century BC to an increasingly orientalizing culture influenced by Greek traders which was followed by the Etruscan civilization. Villanovan culture and people branched from the Urnfield culture of Central Europe. The name Villanovan comes from the first archaeological site where artifacts were discovered near Villanova, not far from Bologna in northern Italy.  They controlled the rich copper and iron mines of Tuscany and were accomplished metalworkers.

Villanovan Impasto Ware Vessel

Link: http://www.clioancientart.com/catalog/i41.html

CULTURE / REGION OF ORIGIN: Villanovan Culture, Italy (Northern Lazio or Southern Etruria))
DATE:  8th – 7th Century BCE
DIMENSIONS: Maximum height with handle 11 cm (4.3 in.); maximum width 13.1 cm (5.1 in.); rim diameter 12.0 cm (4.7 in.)

DESCRIPTION: A Villanovan brown Impasto Ware dipper. The vessel rests on a flat bottom, expands to its greatest width about half way up the bowl, narrows slightly, then continues vertically up to the lip. At three roughly equidistant points around the outside of the body, there are nipple-like projections. The handle is flat in section and divided into two loops. The entire surface is highly burnished, inside and out. There are three very small chips to the rim but the vessel is otherwise intact. A very nice example of the type.

PROVENANCE: Formerly in the collection of Lord Dayton of Corran, the collection formed between 1960 and 2000.

PUBLISHED: Ex Bonhams, ANTIQUITIES, 27 April 2006, London, Page 160, illustrated in color on Page 159.

COMPARISONS: Sestieri and De Santis, The Protohistory of the Latin Peoples, Electa, Rome, 2000, pages 36, 62 and 84 for examples of Villanovan Impasto Ware jugs or dippers of very similar form, with divided handles and projections on the body.

SPECIAL NOTES:  The Etruscan civilization of Italy has its immediate roots in the Villanovan culture of west central Italy; an area open to influences from Greek and Carthaginian colonists and traders and northern European Celtic cultures. The Villanovan culture, centered in a broad area around the modern city of Bologna, rapidly developed from simple agricultural village life to a more socially stratified and technologically sophisticated society. The Etruscan cities of the following centuries grew directly out of Villanovan town foundations.This large, beautiful, highly polished pottery vessel offers a glimpse forward to the sohpisticated Etruscan Impasto and Bucchero wares of the 7th and 6th Centuries BCE.