villainism

anonymous asked:

Imagine this! It's that time for Black Hat's eye to bleed again, and Flug offers to help him through it again. But then something happens, I dunno, and Flug gets slapped across the face by Black Hat's claws, tearing the bag and cutting flesh! Black Hat stares in horror as he realizes what he's done, as Flug raises a hand to his bleeding cheek.

boi, u done fucked up

Okay so this is super random but I saw a post a few days ago about Dr. Doofenshmirtz of Phineas and Ferb and father’s day (I cannot find it for the life of me so if you know which one I’m talking about let me know) and I was thinking about it just now and I realized…Dr. Doof’s backstories are the perfect way of thinking about villain motivations. From what I remember, almost every one of his evil schemes were based on some kind of traumatic experience. Each scheme involves some kind of crazy and outlandish machine and passionate speeches about the evils of lawn gnomes or whatever he’s angry about. BUT in the Christmas special he can’t come up with a reason to hate Christmas and therefore has no motivation to go through with his evil plan to ruin Christmas so he sort just goes along with it because “he’s evil” and it’s all just so pointless. WHICH IS EXACTLY HOW IT SHOULD WORK. Just like Dr. Doof, your villain needs a legitimate motivation to go through all the work and be passionate enough to fight with everything they have against the protagonist. Without it they’re boring, easily thwarted. and kind of listless. As goofy and stupid as some of the backstories are for Dr. Doof they make sense to him and that’s what makes for a great villain.