victorious defeat

The 3 Elements of a CHARACTER GOAL

You know that moment in a book or movie, near the end, where everything has gone terribly wrong? All has been lost, the main character appears to have been brutally defeated, the mentor has probably kicked the bucket, and generally things couldn’t look bleaker? 

Writing feels like that moment.

Or more accurately, one point in the writing process feels akin to that dark night. It’s that time after the intrepid writer has pushed through the first draft of the story – they’ve brainstormed the development process, sailed through the beginning, blazed through the middle – and then quite suddenly …everything falls apart.

And this despair can be summed up in one soul-crushing sentence: “What happens at the end?" 

The writer realizes that they don’t know. A giddy optimism has propelled them thus far, a chipper little voice in the back of their head assuring "Don’t worry about the end yet! It’ll sort itself out!”

That little happy voice, it turns out, is a liar. 

But your reign of terror is over, lying voice. There’s a way to fix it so you can never trick another writer again. Because knowing what happens at the end comes down to knowing something right in the beginning: knowing three integral facets of the main character. If you know this golden trio, you’ll have a much better chance of knowing exactly what happens at the end: because the end is all about these three. 

So what are these three things? 

GOAL: What the main characters wants, and will pursue throughout the story, overcoming all obstacles and enemies to obtain. 

WANT: Their reasons for wanting it, which is usually to fill some emotional void they sense in their lives, something they believe will fix life and make it complete.

NEED: What they TRULY require to fill that emotional void, to be complete. 

Yup, three of the things listed in that other post “10 Elements of a Main Character”. But now, we’re going to delve into more detail, the elements of a good Goal, a good Want, and a good Need. 

So what goes into a story GOAL? Goals should be …

SINGULAR: The character must have one objective, and only one. A desire, and the overcoming of obstacles to achieve it, form the spine of the story. If there are two, the character is split between two storylines; they are trying to balance two stories at once, confusing them and confusing the reader. 

TANGIBLE: The goal must be something REAL. Something we can see and feel. 

SPECIFIC: In addition to being tangible, it must be highly specific. If the goal was to “escape” it would have to be “escape to a definite destination”. It can’t be at all vague or easily fulfilled by many objects: it must be finding a specific object, winning a specific prize, getting to a specific destination, etc.  

Like in Tangled: The goal is “see the floating lights.”

NOT EMOTIONS/STATES OF MIND: The goal can’t be something like “happiness” or “belonging” or “love.” Those aren’t tangible, they’re not specific, and most of all the reader can’t envision it being achieved. The goal CAN be a physical representation of an emotional state; obtaining this specific and physical objective will mean achieving the emotional state. 

IMAGINABLE: We should be able to easily envision the main character achieving the goal. When we see it, we know it’s happening, know that everything has been building to this moment.

Like in Monsters Inc, we know what getting Boo back home is going to look like (though in the beginning, we don’t know that it’s going to be heartbreaking.)

NOBLE: The goal should be something the reader can cheer on. The reader understands why the main character wants it. The reader can relate to the goal, and the emotional reason behind it.

Cheer like this.

STAKES: If they fail, something will be lost. If they choose not to pursue the goal, things will be very bad. There can’t be a sense that if they stop going after the goal at any point, life could just go back to how it was. When the catalyst came in and shattered their ordinary world and everyday routine, the story entered the realm of “nothing will ever be the same” and the only way to restore order to their universe is to achieve this thing. And that thing that will be lost must be something we can relate to, something significant: love, safety, family, life, future, freedom, loved ones. 

What goes into the WANT? The want is…

CONNECTED TO GHOST: The ghost is a moment from their past that still haunts them, and is the source of their moral and psychological weaknesses. Their reasons for wanting the goal should be connected to this moment. They believe that if they achieve it, their world will be fixed, life will go back to how it was before this haunting moment occurred.

MISGUIDED: And they’re usually always wrong. Achieving the goal just as it is will never fix what’s broken in their lives. 

SAVING GRACE: It’s often this Want behind their goal that acts as their saving grace in the eyes of the reader. Sometimes it’s hard to connect with a character – they’re difficult to understand, easy to find unappealing, even downright unpleasant – until we know why they are the way they are. (Think Marlin from Finding Nemo; he’s pretty unlikable and frustrating half the time, but we know why he’s behaving that way, so it’s easier to forgive him.) 

What do all of these character NEEDS have in common?

HOW TO FIX LIFE: In their pursuit of the tangible goal, something else is revealed that will truly save their lives. This is some truth that will banish the power of the ghost, let the character see themselves clearly for the first time, and show them what needs to be done to live a better life in the future. This usually arrives right after that “Dark Night” moment, which is usually when the goal has been achieved or lost; the truth revealed in this moment will allow them to snatch victory from this darkest defeat, renew their courage, inspire them to soldier on and pursue the story goal once more. 

NEW WORLDVIEW: This crucible of battle and revelation of truth changes them. They’re not the same person anymore. They’ve conquered the thing that haunts them, overcome weaknesses, have greater knowledge of themselves and life.

Okay! So how does this work? Let’s use Wreck-It Ralph, because I’m in the mood.

What is Ralph’s Goal? 

A medal. 

A single medal will suffice. A tangible medal that we can easily envision. A specific medal, namely the one he got from Hero’s Duty.  A medal that we can imagine him obtaining, bringing to the Nicelanders, and using to change his lot in life. 

It’s easy to cheer on because it means Ralph doesn’t have to live in the garbage, alone anymore. We can relate to it, and cheer it on, because nobody wants to be alone (especially not while living in garbage). 

And the stakes for this are obvious: ___.

Now how about what Ralph wants?

This medal is connected to Ralph’s ghost which is years and years of being the bad guy. The bad, unlikable, unloved, unworthy, friendless guy. 

He thinks if he gets it, he’ll become the good guy at long last, and his loneliness and lack of self-worth will end. 

How is this his saving grace? It immediately makes the audience empathize with Ralph. Everyone, at some point, has felt alone and unloved. 


What about what he Needs?

Getting the medal doesn’t work out for Ralph. It doesn’t fix anything. What he NEEDS is this medal:

To become a hero, he needs to be the hero for Vanellope. 

New Worldview: 

“As long as that little kid likes me … “ 

So these three are the destination. These are what everything is going towards. If you know these three elements, you’ll have a much better chance of an ending forming in your head. So take that annoying little liar voice.

You know what that voice looks like?  Her. It looks like Umbridge.

Sorry I wanted you to hate it as much as I do.

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again. Who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause. Who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement; and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”
— Theodore Roosevelt

The 15 PLOT POINTS of Story Structure

To all the writers who have ever been told they need to outline their story, and privately thought “Great. But how do you DO that? What exactly does that mean?! Is there a map? WHAT IS THE SPECIFIC DEFINITION OF THE VAGUE WORD ‘OUTLINE’?”

Good news. Stories have structure. Structure that can be learned. And a fantastic place to start learning structure? 

Save the Cat: The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need by Blake Snyder. This book gives a simple outline that most stories follow. And as an introduction to story structure, it can’t be beat. 

In Save the Cat, 15 plot points are spelled out in something called a beat sheet. During the outlining process, these “beats” or plot points can be used as an armature or skeleton that your story is built upon. 

So what are those 15 plot points?

Opening Image: A snapshot of the hero’s problematic ordinary world, right before the story starts and changes everything. 

Set-Up: Further establishing that ordinary world and what the hero does every day, impressing upon the audience or reader what’s wrong, and the idea that something needs to change.

Theme Stated:  The truth that the hero will learn by experiencing the story, the statement that will be proven to the audience. But upon first encountering this truth, in this story beat right in the beginning, the hero doesn’t understand or outright refuses to believe it. The theme stated is asking a question, a question which the story will answer.

Catalyst: The ordinary world is shattered. Something unexpected happens, and this event triggers all the conflict and change of the whole story. Life will never be the same after this moment. This is the Call to Adventure. 

Debate: But for a moment, the hero won’t be quite sure about answering that call. Leaving behind the ordinary world is difficult – even if the catalyst has come along and disrupted everything – because the ordinary means safety, it means not being challenged, it means avoiding conflict and heartache. Yes, that existence they’re stuck in might be stagnant and unpleasant, but it protects them from facing the intimidating task of growth, of becoming something better.

Break Into 2: And this is when the hero decides to answer the call and cross the threshold of act two, determined to pursue their goal. 

B Story: This is when the relationship – which usually carries and proves the theme – starts in earnest.

Fun & Games: This is just what it says: the premise promised a certain type of pure entertainment, and this beat is where we get to experience it fully. 

Midpoint: This is either a false victory or a false defeat. Something really really good happens. Or something the exact opposite.

Bad Guys Close In: Forces of opposition and conflict begin to converge on the hero and his goal. Everything begins to fall apart for the hero, the defeats piling up one after another, the main character punching back.  

All Is Lost: This is the sequence where absolutely everything falls apart for the hero. The plans fail, the goal is lost, the mentor dies, the villain wins. All is, quite literally, lost. 

Dark Night of the Soul: The hero’s bleakest moment is right here. In addition to all of the tangible things that have been lost, hope and the gumption to continue with the story have also vanished. There is usually a hint of death here, of some kind. An actual death, or an emotional or spiritual death. 

Break into 3: Ah, but there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. Inspiration occurs, hope is rekindled, courage to pursue the story returns. Usually, this is the moment where the main character learns what they NEED, the truth which will heal them, and allow them to fix their own lives. With this, they are able to snatch victory from defeat.

Finale: And in here, the story goal is pursued once more, but this time from the stronger version of the hero – the version that has learned the theme, and committed to act accordingly. 

Closing Image: The opposite of the opening image. This is a snapshot of life after the story, the problems of the ordinary world solved or banished, a new world opening up for the hero. If the opening is the equivalent of “once upon a time” this is saying “And every day after … “ 

So let’s see how that works! And to see it, let’s look at my favorite short film of all time – Paperman  (because this gave me an excuse to watch it several times and listen to the music while writing it.)

1) Opening Image

We see George, a twenty-something in a sixty-something’s suit and tie, obviously on his way to work, and not looking at all enthused about it. He stares straight ahead, expression bored, lifeless, right on the edge of depressed. Wind from a passing train pushes him slightly, and he lets it, demeanor unchanging. 

2) Set-Up

But then a sheet of paper, caught on the wind, hits his shoulder. The paper flies off again, and a young woman appears onscreen, chasing after the paper, as the surprised George watches.

 After catching it offscreen, the girl returns, tucking the paper into the stack she carries, smiling slightly. They both face forward, waiting for the train side-by-side, in silence. She’s glancing sideways at him, he’s smiling and fidgeting nervously, but still resolutely facing forward; they’re both aware of each other, seemingly hoping the other will be braver, but neither able to overcome their shyness and the unspoken rules of everyday life. 

3) Theme Stated 

As a train charges into the station, a paper from George’s stack is snatched by the wind and lands flat on the woman’s face. When he pulls the paper away, she laughs: her lipstick left a perfect kiss mark on the sheet. When George spots it, he laughs too … 

but when he opens his eyes, she’s gone. She’s boarded a different train. The kiss-mark paper flaps in the wind as the train begins to move, taking her away. He watches, crestfallen. She glances back. Looks of regret and disappointment are exchanged, both a little wistful. The paper, the symbol of their fleeting memorable meeting, waves goodbye. 

Through this little sequence of images, the question of the whole story is asked: Was there a connection between them? Will they find each other again? And on a wider level: What does it take to find love? 

Further Set-Up:

And cut to George behind a desk, in a gray office, dark file cabinets towering behind him, clocks on the wall ticking away his life. Miserable again, he stares at the lipsticked paper. A stack of documents slams onto the desk from on high. The grim-faced boss of the office scowls down at him. George frowns at the stack, then at his boss, who stomps away.   

4) Catalyst 

Breeze pulls the kissed paper off his desk and out the open window. He catches it just in time, breathing a sigh of relief. And then he sees something. The girl! She’s there! She’s right across the street! 

5) Debate 

He needs to get her attention! He dithers for a moment, then throws the window wide and enthusiastically waves his arms.

 An ominous "ahem” from the boss brings him back inside, and back to his desk. But his attention is still on the girl, and the need to get her attention. He folds a paper airplane, stands before the window, poises the airplane to fly … but he glances at his boss’s office before he throws it. Should he? 

6) Break Into Act 2

Yes. Yes, he should. He sends the little airplane messenger to bridge the distance between himself and the girl. 

7) B Story

What he should have done while waiting for the train, he’s committed to do now. Talk to her. The relationship of the story has started officially. 

8) Fun & Games

In this moment, he becomes the “paper man” of the title. He folds and throws paper airplane after paper airplane. The boss shows up, shoves him back and slams his window. George pauses until he’s gone, then just keeps sending airplanes. They sail over the street, but are intercepted or miss their mark every time. 

9) Midpoint

He reaches for more paper … and knocks an empty tray off the desk. He’s run out. Except for one paper, the kissed one, the only one he’s held onto. With a determined look, he folds it precisely into an airplane, stands before the window, breathes to steady himself … 

And the wind steals the airplane from his hand, sending it spiraling to the street below, George reaching out pointlessly. On top of this defeat, the girl leaves the office.  

10) Bad Guys Close In 

Immediately, the boss emerges from his lair. The other office workers hurriedly return to their scribbling, hunched to avoid drawing attention. The girl is leaving the building across the street! George turns from the window … and finds the boss looming above him, glowering, delivering another tall pile of meaningless work. 

George sinks into his chair, defeated. But something happens as he watches his boss walk away, as he sees the office workers in neat rows; all of them older versions of George, reflections of what he will become … if he doesn’t do something right now. 

He runs, sending paper from the perfect stacks flying in his wake. 

11) All Is Lost

But when he escapes the building, and attempts to cross the street, cars nearly kill him. And when he finally makes it to the opposite sidewalk, the girl is nowhere in sight. She’s lost again. 

And all he manages to find is the little traitorous paper airplane. The paper he’d believed might mean something, might have signified something important and maybe a little magical. Which it obviously never did. 

12) Dark Night of the Soul

Angry, he grabs the plane and throws it with all his strength.  He’s lost his job, he’s lost the girl, he’s lost all faith in the magic he’d just started to believe might be real. He stomps towards the train station, returning home. 

13) Break Into 3  

But fate has other plans. The airplane glides over the city, almost supernaturally graceful and purposeful. It dives between buildings, and lands in the middle of the alley where all the paper planes have collected. 

It sits immobile. Then it moves. Moves again. And jumps into flight. The airplane flies over the rest, stirring them into motion, into the air. In a place where not even a breath of wind could reach, there is now a whirlwind of George’s airplanes. 

Though the forces of mediocrity tried to keep them apart, something greater has recognized George’s efforts and is going to see things through. 

14) Finale

A parade of airplanes follows George down the street. 

The leader attaches to his leg. He brushes it off, mad. A flurry of them attach to him, then carry him down the street, unfazed by his fighting. 

The leader airplane rockets over the city purposefully, finds the girl, then lures her to follow.

 She chases after. 

Somewhere else in the city, George is being pushed wherever the paper airplanes want him to go. We switch back and forth between George and the girl, as the airplanes push him and beckon her. 

Until they’re both on different trains, which stop simultaneously, on opposite sides of the platform. The girl gets out. She fiddles with the airplane, like she’s trying to get it to work again. And just then, a breeze brings hundreds of paper planes skittering all around the platform.

 She looks up …

15) Closing Image

And there’s George, covered in paper planes. 

He lurches towards Meg, and the airplanes falls away, their work done. 

George and Meg face each other, smiling, the barriers of routine and shyness overcome. Exactly what should have happened, exactly what was meant to happen. Putting effort into connection and love prevailed in the end, defeating the allure of life spent in safety and mediocrity. The closing image is the opposite of the opening: he’s not alone, he’s not facing the train leading to his mundane job, he’s not looking miserable and hopeless. He’s facing the girl, his bright and meaningful new future.

***

So! Those are the 15 plot points. This is a fantastic way to begin learning what story structure is, why it works the way it does, and how to precisely pull it off. 

For a more in-depth explanation, I highly recommend picking up a copy of Save the Cat. (It holds a special place in my heart; it was the first screenwriting book I ever read, and started obsessive study of storytelling.)

- ANGST WEEK -

Because sometimes we have to put our favourite characters through hell and back. Why? No one knows


Angst Week will commence on April 17th and run until the 26th.

This blog uses the time GMT+11:00. Because of conflicting time-zones, late entries will be accepted. The deadline is one week after the week officially ends

Prompts

  • Day 1: Mistakes / Aftermath
  • Day 2: Secrets / Lies
  • Day 3: Family / Friends
  • Day 4: Love / Life
  • Day 5: Victory / Defeat
  • Day 6: Confessions / Reveal
  • Day 7: Free Day / AU

Use the tag #ml angst week in the first five tags of your post.  If your post does not appear on our blog within 24-hours, message us so that we may reblog it. Submissions are also allowed

Any creation is welcomed e.g. art, fanfiction, videos, edits, gifs etc

Re-blogging this post would be much appreciated. Even if you do not plan on participating, spreading the word is good enough. The more people see it, the better.

Also, if you want the latest news or updates on the blog or weeks, don’t forget to follow

No read-more this time around since the prompts are pretty straight-forward

3

Gintama: Battle on Rakuyou Arc Part 7 | “But I have to apologize, everyone. I’ve started to feel it doesn’t matter whether we win this battle or not. If I just cast aside thoughts of victory and defeat, I can raise hell with those punks. If you knew I was havin’ pathetic thoughts like these, you probably wouldn’t let me stand by your side anymore.”

STICKERS LIST JANUARY 27, 2017 / heart / sunglasses / the eyes of dr. coppy / fancy advertisement / terrible scream / tumblr brand / speech bubble / slime bubble / thought bubble / “cringe” / “feeling this” / “feels” / “no” / “omg” / “?” / “same” / “the real me” / “us” / “what is reality” / “yes” / alien friend  / corgi dog / cat / jellyfish / tall fish / long fish / alien eyes / pretty hair / pretty eyes / cat ears / golden ring / satan cones / fancy bow / powdered wig / tall-hat / sobby eyes / drug glasses / vr helmet / friendly drone / secret file  / falling graph / rising graph / accusation / snow home  / chakra man / money stack / assorted moons / palm frond / eye of providence / rainbow / scented candle / spacetime continuum / garbage holder / webring / yin-yang / tombstone / banana / coffee cup / pizza slice / sushi roll / ramen bowl / food box / long bread / cupcake / egg / sparkling water / teapot / zodiacs of the sun / sky flare / geode flare / swimming pool flare / dreamer flare / rainbow flare / southwestern flare / red objects / blue objects / violet objects / yellow objects / aqua glow / indigo glow / ruby red glow / salmon glow / lemon glow / slime glow / charcoal glow / confetti (diagonal thrust) / confetti (vertical thrust) / web of ectoplasm / victory pennant / defeat pennant / math tunnel / wobble grid / impossible box / bubbles / FOR PHOTOS, FOR GIFS, FOR EVERYONE

iOS / Android

“Did the Black Bloc at Berkeley just prove Milo right?

No. No, they didn’t.

Milo’s supporters have claimed that they’re vindicated no matter how the Left responds to his appearances. If you go across campus and have a separate event, you’re a “snowflake” in a “safe space”. If you protest, you’re a “shrill SJW” who “doesn’t want dialogue”. If you riot and shut his event down, you’re a “leftist goon”. Debate? Milo didn’t come to debate- and if you give him a debate partner, the next stop he’ll still be claiming that the left is “afraid to debate him”.

If the Berkeley protesters had stood there peacefully chanting, they would still be accused, today, of hating free speech. Milo, a vocal supporter and sycophant of an administration that put a gag rule on scientists and defames the press, doesn’t get accused of hating free speech. The ongoing defunding and censorship of left-wing curriculum and groups on college campuses doesn’t get called an attack on free speech. That’s because this isn’t about an abstract right to free speech- it’s about power, and challenging speech that upholds and defends the status quo (which is what Milo is about, whatever his ramblings about the “liberal establishment”) is always seen as a threat to free speech, while censorship imposed by the wealthy and powerful never is.

At least in Berkeley, the accusations of censorship come the morning after a victory, not a defeat.“

rebelcaptain appreciation week ✩ day seven  ➤ free

He’d told Jyn: We’ve done terrible things on behalf of the Rebellion. Some he remembered now -Tivik, who’d made all this possible and been rewarded with death- but most, to Cassian’s shame, he couldn’t bring to mind. He’d bartered his ideals and the lives of others away, one by one, to find a victory that would make it a ll worthwhile. Yet as he watched the pulsing lights of the turbo lift he felt keenly that neither victory nor defeat would change the terrible things in his past.

Jyn couldn’t give him what he’d come for.

That was the crux of it, really.

Because he’d given her what she needed, and he’d done the mission right, and he found that was enough.

She believed someone was out there. Maybe it was even true.

He did want it to be true. With all his heart, he did.

Her faith carried him with her.

He didn’t say any of it. He didn’t want to disturb the silence as they rested against each other, hurting and relaxed, listening to the hum of machinery and the distant billowing of fires. He stowed thoughts of old missions and thoughts of the future away; decided to focus on what he could see and hear and smell for the last moments of his life on Scarif. 

When Cassian Andor died, he would be ready, and he would be content.

Salty-Prisoner-Kallus™ in Zero Hour - best quotes

“You talk too much!”


Thrawn: “You have the heart of a Rebel.”

Kallus: “I’ll take that as a compliment.”


Thrawn: *Gives Konstantine special orders*

Kallus, kneeling, bruised: “Fighting over glory?”


*chuckles darkly, nearly coughs up blood*

“I’ve been in this position before, only to have the rebels pull victory from certain defeat.”


Pryce: “Stop them!”

Kallus: *smirks* “Thrawn’s not going to be happy with you making a mess of his fleet.”


*smirks*

*SMIRKS MORE*

anonymous asked:

Do you have any new star wars fic recs? I may have gone and read through all the ones in your tag :)

JUST ONE. AFTER THE BATTLE. explicit, rey/phasma

Rey always allows herself one cigarette after a battle, win or lose. Which is fortunate, considering she can’t determine if dallying with a captain of the First Order is a victory or a defeat.

Listen, I’ve been on the hunt for good Rey/Phasma since the movie came out, and this is exactly the flavor I was craving—bad decisions, grudging connection, battlefield sex. You can practically hear ‘jealous of your cigarette’ playing in the background as you read.

TAXICAB. gen, ocs

Escorting a mathematician from a university to a transport should not be an Empire-shaking assignment.

On stormtroopers, math, and the meaning of names. A really nice bit of worldbuilding, with a light touch of humor and great OCs. 

MY FRIENDS, MY FRIENDS FORGIVE ME. gen, bail organa & leia organa

Bail has never tried to outrun his ghosts. He is an Organa and an Antilles and the husband of the Queen of Alderaan; he does not run from anything.

But, sometimes. Sometimes his ghosts pop up and stare him in the face like his life is a cheap horror holofilm, and he cannot help but be taken aback.

I’m very picky about Bail and Leia (and really the Organas as a whole) but this is such a nice fic about Bail seeing Anakin and Padme in Leia.

EMPTY HEAD. explicit, kylo ren | ben/poe dameron

The first time Ben Organa uses a Jedi mind trick on Poe Dameron, it’s an accident. All the other times aren’t. It leaves an impression, to say the least.

WARNINGS FOR RAPE/ABUSE & DUBCON—I am weak for darkfic that gets creatively horrible. (I think I’ve recced ‘fraud in a field of poppies’ before, it belongs to the same awful family as this.) Especially once you throw in an increasingly twisted Kylo Ben, and the full terrible implications of the Jedi mind trick.

BOUND. explicit, rey/kylo ren

Rey and Kylo are stranded together on a world without technology where they cannot use the Force.

I love Rey/Kylo Ren as a pairing, but it’s hard to find fic with good characterization of both parties. This delivers on the prickly, grudging, stubborn, sulking, twisted up pair of them, and how they manage to find a kind of uncomfortable common ground despite that.

INVINCIBLE SUMMER. gen, finn-centric.

Finn is recaptured by the First Order. He will not give up as easily as they would prefer.

An extremely delightful Finn-centric adventure, plus you get to imagine Finn doing push ups, which is a plus.

Honestly I’m so tired of all this unfair hate for Tony.
We all can write, draw, do an essay, make schemes of every single reason why Tony Stark is a good person, why he cares, why he is a hero not just because he is IronMan and why he deserves better.
Haters will reduce everything in a simple “yes but he creates Ultron”, “he fucked up”, “he’s an alcoholic”, “he’s egocentric” and other shit like that.
We can spend our life telling them that Tony Stark is only human, that his faith in people fucked him up, that he is just scared and wants to protect the ones he loves. That he is always suffering, both mentally and physically. That he creates Ultron not just for fucking fun but because, for him, it was the only right thing to do to save the world. And he was wrong, he knows that.
But humans do that you know.
People get scared and react. He was not trained for this shit and he has not superpower so he did the thing he can do better: build a machine.
That’s pretty much what he did, react. He didn’t hide, he had the courage to react.
He fucked up, but then he went and tried to fix his mistakes but even then haters blamed him for the civil war. So what’s the point?
Now I just wanna say to everyone who’s in #TonyStarkDefenseSquad, let’s just spread around how magnificent our genius is.
Let’s celebrate his personal victories and even his defeats even if no one else understands what it took to accomplish them. We know he’s came a long way from where he began, he has grown. We won’t forget his past and all the pain he went through. We’re gonna always be upset when some little jerk will say shit about him but Tony Stark taught us to be better, and fight for the things we believe in and the people we love so…
Let’s protect him but guys, stop fighting with haters: It’s not worthy it.