victorian map

Without exaggeration, this map took me 15 hours to draw. I didn’t think it would take that long. But this isn’t the sort of thing I usually draw, so it took me longer than usual. If you look at it and enjoy it, it’s worthwhile though! It’s another item for my table top role-playing friends. I still need to do some character sheets. It will be nice to start a new project now!

7

HEY, CRIMSON PEAK FANS!


THIS IS THE REAL MR. CUSHING. 

Peter Cushing was the dashing, elegant, holy-cheekbones British actor who starred in many English Gothic horror movies from the 50s to the 70s. The very same horror films that greatly influenced Guillermo Del Toro, the director of “Crimson Peak”. Del Toro is actually a major Cushing fanboy, and it is probably in this man’s memory that Edith received her surname. 

If you loved “Crimson Peak”, please do yourself a huge favor and (legally) rent or purchase some old Hammer Horror films, such as “Curse of Frankenstein” or “The Revenge of Frankenstein” (from which films these images are from). Chances are, you’ll love them. Del Toro certainly does. 

mrsives  asked:

hi pauline, I was just wondering if you have any places in edinburgh you find particularly interesting/enjoyable/that you'd recommend to someone visiting there? I'll be there for 4 days with a friend, and we're trying to make the most of our visit. (also I hope you're enjoying the ma and living there, and apologies if this has already been asked!)

Hey love, sorry for my late reply! 

First things first, I have to say that I’m still pretty much a tourist in the city, and that I keep to the old part of town anyway, which might make things a bit boring for you. But here are the things I like doing best here:

Walk the Royal Mile up and down over and over again. It’s terribly cliché, but it’s such a lovely street, cobble-stoned, full of overpriced, archetypal scottish products, but resonating with the song of bagpipes, buoyant with street artists, surrounded by old, tilting houses, peppered with fairy lights; at the top, you enter a strange, time-travelesque, gothic slope that will bring you up to the castle, which is absolutely a must see. You can stay within the castle walls for hours on end—magnificent view, multiple museums and chapels, stony benches, a strange step in the Middle-Ages.

Tour the university campus—there, you’ll find Walter Scott’s house, the beautiful Old College buildings, the modern Library and its art collections. In the Student’s Union House, you’ll be able to take a drink and walk through rooms upon rooms of comfortable armchairs, hushed whispers and loud laughters, impressive ballrooms and tiny writing offices. Down the Middle Meadow Walk, you’ll find a large, green park too. 

Really, it’s a strangely scaled city: it feels like an out-of-time town, small and twisty and labyrinthine, yet it’s the capital, full of historic sites and cultural spots. 

St. Giles Cathedral is exquisite, and solemn, and full of hushed light; of course the National Gallery is lovely if you’re interested in British art, but my favourite is the National Museum, which is a wonderful bric-à-brac of knowledge and playful activities and delightful treasures. There you’ll find fashion designs as well as medieval war weapons, dinosaur skeletons and Art Deco tapestries, the Lewis Chessmen, and even space stones. The National Library is worth a short visit, with its whacky museum and a bunch of beautiful maps and books. Grab a coffee in the charity coffee-shop of the Storytelling Centre, enjoy the view of its lush, secret garden, and its folktales bookstore. Near it, you’ll find my favourite jewellery shop, full of Scottish stones, Highland Gems. I also love to walk in the Greyfriars and the St. Cuthbert cemeteries, which are gothic and yet full of whimsical life stories, ornate benches, strange, twisted trees; and of course, try and go climb Arthur’s Seat—the climb is painful and the view is spectacular, and it’s so strange to see this ragged, wonderful, green, ocre, beautiful hill in the corner of your eye, wherever you are, alien in the center of the city. 

The light, here, anyway… The light on Arthur’s Seat, on Calton Hill (another nice climb!), on the Castle; rich and golden and extraordinary.

In Grassmarket, you’ll find Armstrong Vintage store, which I recommend wholeheartedly, especially if you want a Scottish wool cardigan for an affordable price, or even just to take a look at the ancient ecclesiastical and victorian garments hanging from the ceiling. There’s also this wonderful shop with a lot of dinosaur’s bones, fossils and star stones, Mr. Wood’s Fossils. From there and up to Westport, you’ll find Mary’s Milk Bar (great ice-cream), cute antique shops, bookstores, and the Art Library.

Now for my favourite bookstores, I’d recommend you go to Armchair Books (the absolute best, a twisting labyrinth of new and second-hand books, with a great antique section); Southside Books; Waterstones on Prince’s Street, where you’ll find beautiful modern editions and will be able to get some great coffee/tea and nice gluten free (or not) cakes; the OldTown bookshop, where victorian copies neighbour old maps and antique drawings of the old Edinburgh, and which is incidentally located on the lovely Victoria Street; and of course Blackwells, which features a very cool Harry Potter window. 

Now for the real Tourist Experience, I do recommend you take one or two of Edinburgh’s walking tours, because they’re wonderful. One of them would be the writer’s museum book-lover tour, which starts at the museum (very small, but super nice, with a lot of Scottish’s writers memorabilia) and takes you around Old Town—to the university where Conan Doyle studied, the hospital where J. M. Barrie invented Wendy, wrecking the myth of J. K. R’s Elephant House (Harry Potter was NOT written there!), etc. The other tours I’d recommend are the ghost tours (usually guides dress up and play morbid jokes on your group, and it’s a very fun way of learning about the actual old Edinburgh) and the underground tours (the underground city being full of morbid legends, spooky closes, twists and turns). 

Here you go, it’s mostly stuff you can find online, I’m afraid, but I hope you have fun!

3

GUYS HOLY CRAP THE MOST AMAZING THING JUST HAPPENED

So we’re doing some construction on my house, which was made at some point during the Victorian Era, when we found a christmas card from 1883 trapped inside the outer layer of my bedroom wall, behind the skirting!!

THIS ENTIRE TIME THERE’S BEEN A 132 YEAR OLD VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS CARD IN MY BEDROOM??? HOLY CRAP???

In 1883 Canada had literally been a country for less than two decades, and this card is ridiculously well-preserved! You have no idea how much i’m freaking out over this

The message says “With much love and best wishes from the Bickell/Biekell/Beckell family (writing unclear), xmas, 1883.”

Prelim update, day 14!

It’s over. It’s done. The final document is 82 pages long. I did it in fourteen days- really thirteen, because I took a whole day (actually, a little more than a day) off after I finished the three drafts. To put that in perspective, my entire undergraduate thesis was 64 pages long and I had an entire year to do that- and a good chunk of that was figures because my undergraduate thesis involved mapping out Victorian-era cemeteries. This had no figures- just pages and pages and pages of text. Roughly 5.86 pages per day if you count the full fourteen; 6.31 if you take it at thirteen.

If anything, these past two weeks were an exercise in writing like you’re running out of time. I did really enjoy them! But at the same time, the pace was very frantic towards the end. Not with writing, with editing and managing my citations. That’s definitely an area where I need to focus on improving my efficiency! I think it might be worth it to schedule some little writing sabbaticals like this where I have to produce something worthwhile in a tight time limit, just to get better and faster. 

The worst part, though, will be the wait. It can take months for prelim results to get back. One of my very good friends took his last semester and he still hasn’t gotten his comments back. Prelims are basically a trial by jury; a committee of five decides whether you pass or whether you have to revise. I’m crossing my fingers that I pass- I know two of my reviewers will be kind and one will be… critical but not harsh. It’s the other two that are kind of unknowns!

Editor of the day: My entire editing squad. High fives all around, my loves.

it is hard to high five a snake

Unofficial Future Map: Melbourne Metro Train Network by Bernie Ng

Submitted by Bernie, whose excellent map of Singapore (Nov. 2013, 3.5 stars) has already been featured on this site. Bernie says:

Hi Cameron,

I saw your post about the new Victorian Rail Network concept map (April 2014, 3.5 stars) by PTV and was very impressed - it’s quite a quantum leap forward from the existing map.  I thought I’d have a go at further redefining the map, but for the Melbourne Metro network only. (I personally don’t see the value in putting the regional/metro network in one map – an average user won’t really need both networks together, and as you say, scale is an issue.)

Quite naturally, the City Loop is used as the visual focal point.  I was hoping it could be placed in the centre of the map, but given the lopsided nature of Melbourne, it was not quite possible.  I have added some of the proposed extensions for the network, including the metro tunnel running through the city, creating a bypass from the congested loop. (This tunnel is currently attracting lots of debate - the latest government proposal is to run it south of the loop via Montague - although I prefer the original proposed route and have shown that on the map.)

Stopping patterns are shown as they are relatively simple compared to Sydney’s. Most routes operate all stops, or with one all stops and one limited stops service. With recent interest on “clockface” or “turn-up-and-go” services, the map indicates which stations have services at least every 15 minutes or better during the daytime.

Each line is assigned a letter code for easier identification, especially for tourists.  The letters are assigned in a counterclockwise order, starting with A-Line for Airport (Tullamarine) services.  

Melbourne public transport uses a fare zone system, but the number of zones have been reduced over the years. I would actually prefer to have more zones, which result in the ability to charge fares more commensurate with the distance travelled. This map shows fare zones in 10km increments from Southern Cross station. (I also have a cleaner version of the map omitting the zones.)

The font used is Source Sans Pro – thanks so much for the tip!  It is indeed a really great font. Very visually pleasing with high legibility. Perfect for maps.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the map.

—-

Transit Maps says:

This is great work once again from Bernie: a very attractive map that features some distinctive and lovely flowing route lines. The representation of the City Loop as a perfect circle is deftly handled and a perfect focal point for the map (the ever-important visual “hook” that helps a map stand out from the crowd). However, I’m not so keen on the way that the labels for the stations on the loop are angled as if they were spokes on a wheel – Bernie’s done an otherwise excellent job of constraining labels to just two angles (horizontal and reading up from bottom left to top right), and this just seems a little gimmicky and fussy to me.

Bernie’s frequency icons are a nice usability touch (it’s always nice to know that you’re never more than 15 minutes away from the next train!), but I’m less convinced by his attempts to show service patterns. Looking at the legend, he’s using eight different station icons to convey this information, which is a lot to ask users of the map to remember. And – at least in the smaller image size that Tumblr allows – it’s pretty tricky to tell some of those icons apart visually. I’m generally in favour of letting timetables deal with the nitty-gritty of showing local/express route combinations, and this treatment doesn’t really convince me otherwise, although I certainly appreciate the effort Bernie has put into it.

Speaking of the legend, it really is beautifully put together and very comprehensive. Placing it neatly into Port Phillip Bay really works pretty much perfectly.

About the only other comment I have is regarding Bernie’s proposed route naming conventions. If I was giving route designations based simply on the alphabet as Bernie has done here, I would start at the one nearest the 12 o'clock position (probably Bernie’s “T” South Morang route) and continue in a clockwise direction, rather than anti-clockwise. It’s simply far more intuitive to use a universally understood convention like this to make finding route lines easier. Yes, “A” for “Airport” is hard to resist, but none of the other routes have any correlation between their destination stations and the letter designation, so the “A” should be as easy to find as possible.

Our rating: Looks fabulous, but perhaps tries a little too hard to convey a lot of information. Still, I have to applaud Bernie for pushing the envelope and attempting something a little out of the box (and mainly succeeding). Three-and-a-half stars.

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