victoria sea

Penguin Teen Interns Recommend!!!

Summer is almost over, and sadly, it is time to say goodbye to our Summer 2017 Penguin Teen interns. They have been hard at work reading manuscripts, posting online Penguin Teen content, creating eBooks, planning author tours, attending lots of fun meetings and of course, doing lots and lots of reading! Before they left, we asked them for a few of their MUST READS you don’t want to miss out on!    

An Ember in the Ashes series by Sabaa Tahir

Oona Ryle (Publicity Intern)
“An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir could not have been more aptly named –  it won’t burn you, but the story will draw you closer with the warmth she creates in the character relationships. I’m reading the sequel, A Torch Against the Night, right now, and somehow, it’s even better than the first book!”

Perfect Ten by L. Philips 

Dan Denning (Retail Marketing & Advertising Intern) 
“They say to never judge a book by its cover, but I fell in love with this book the instant I saw the cover… whoops. Still, the vibrancy, romanticism, and humor you see on that cover is exactly what is inside the book too! Sam’s journey to find his perfect boyfriend in a town where he is one of the only gay boys kept me 100 percent invested throughout all 352 pages. Read it for the captivating story, the adorable characters, the juicy romantic drama, and because you REALLY want to know which of Sam’s four crushes ends up being the final boy behind that unicorn mask on the cover.” 

Keep reading

theguardian.com
'Faceless' fish missing for more than a century rediscovered by Australian scientists
Expedition leader says the deep-sea fish had not been seen in waters off Australia since 1873
By Elle Hunt

A “faceless” deep-sea fish not seen for more than a century has been rediscovered by scientists trawling the depths of a massive abyss off Australia’s east coast, along with “amazing” quantities of rubbish.

The 40cm fish was rediscovered 4km below sea level in waters south of Sydney by scientists from Museums Victoria and the Australian government’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) on the weekend.

Dr Tim O’Hara, the chief scientist and expedition leader, who is a senior curator of marine invertebrates at Museums Victoria, said it was the first time the fish had been seen in waters off Australia since 1873, when one was dredged up by a British ship near Papua New Guinea.

“This little fish looks amazing because the mouth is actually situated at the bottom of the animal so, when you look side-on, you can’t see any eyes, you can’t see any nose or gills or mouth,” O’Hara said via satellite phone from the research vessel Investigator on Wednesday. “It looks like two rear-ends on a fish, really.”

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