veterinaris

Case Study #3

Alright vetlings, put your thinking hats on for Dr Ferox’s case study #3.

Patient was a senior, small breed dog with no significant medical history, treated in recent years for little more than a touch of arthritis and seasonal allergies. Lately her owner thought her current arthritis treatment regime wasn’t quite doing enough, so she came in for a health check.

She was a little quieter than usual, with a slightly stiff gait but no localizing lameness. Physical exam was unremarkable. A blood screen was taken before starting on long term NSAIDS.

Biochemistry and thyroid hormone was normal, but hematology looked like this:

So, tell me vet students:

  • WTF you think is going on
  • How worried should we be?
Got7 as College Majors and their instagrams

Mark Tuan, the business communications major who you can never find on campus because he’s either drunk in a bush or in LA. 

Im Jaebum, the music production major who always wears his headphones because he’s either working on a new song or actively avoiding people

Jackson Wang, the nutrition major who often tells you off for eating unhealthy foods while drunk and is all over people’s snapchats on a Friday night

Park Jinyoung, the Law major with a minor in English Literature who is the president of every society on campus and is known for buying his one night stands coffee

Choi Youngjae, the Veterinary major who runs a dog walking business to pay off his student debt and because he simply loves dogs 

Kunpimook Bhuwakul, the textiles major who is always drunk 1 second into the parties and who also runs a successful fashion blog

Kim Yugyeom, the dance major who always manages to turn up to his 8am classes due to being scared of Jinyoung even though his dance show finished at 3am and he was out partying until 5am

Since it’s almost “new puppy” season, I thought I’d pass this along.  For those of us in “Heartworm Central“ where moxidectin (and not the dirt-cheap ivermectin) is the prevention of choice, the difference is more like four years’ worth of prevention.

Immiticide (heartworm treatment) can cost anywhere from $500 to $1000, not including other drugs used in the protocol, like doxycycline, prednisone, heartworm prevention, and pain relief.

In the U.S., only Diroban and Immiticide are approved for use in canine heartworm treatment.

This is the heart worm infested heart of a pitbull who had been living on the street for some time. The dog was humanely euthanized because of the severity of the infestation.

This heart was donated with the lungs to our 4H group to teach us the importance of getting heart worm preventives, about how the parasite lives and grows and the effect it has on the dog’s health. The heart and worms are on display with a few loose worms at the vet clinic belonging to our leader to teach others.

10

When Scientists Get Accidentally Artsy

A new exhibit at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History lies right at the intersection of art and science, showcasing the inherent beauty of skeletons — that is, fish skeletons.

DONT ask Vetblrs for emergency and time sensitive veterinary advice

I mean it, seriously DONT. I don’t care what your reason is, if you need emergency or urgent veterinary advice then you pick up the phone and CALL someone.

You are potentially endangering your pets life by delaying treatment.

Veterinarians are only licensed and registered to provide veterinary advice in the state or country they practice in. On the internet you don’t know where someone lives, you don’t know where we live, and so we’re not legally covered if we give you specific veterinary medical advice.

We also might not be online. If you’ve got a situation where your animal needs emergency treatment within the hour and we’re not online, who’s fault is that if your pet suffers or dies? Yours, realistically, because you thought messaging someone you don’t know online is a substitute for calling a clinic. But morally, we will feel partially responsible for not being online at the right time to stop you being a bloody idiot.

And we can’t do anything for you. We can’t write you a prescription to have medication delivered by drone. We physically can’t do anything to help your pet.

CALL A CLINIC. I don’t care if you think ‘vets are expensive’, a phone call is not.

CALL A CLINIC. I don’t care if you think they’re closed, more and more clinics are open late and most clinics either divert the practice phone to a vet’s mobile overnight, or give you the contact number of clinics that are still open.

CALL A CLINIC. I don’t care if you’re shy. It’s always fine to call a clinic, especially if you think your pet is at any risk at all.

Don’t think Google is a substitute either. Googling wastes precious time, and there’s a plethora of false information out there. You can’t be certain of anyone’s qualifications online. CALL A CLINIC.

Don’t shift responsibility off yourself by thinking messaging a Vetblr here is adequate care. We have enough mental health rubbish to deal with without the guilt of knowing that your animal might die because you chose to message us.

DO NOT ASK A VETBLR FOR EMERGENCY, URGENT OR TIME SENSITIVE ADVICE.

Call a vet clinic.

Black Cat Appreciation Day | 17 August

10 Reasons Why Black Cats Should Be Appreciated Today and Every Other Day of the Year

1. Black Cats are less likely to be adopted from animal shelters for a variety of reasons. 

2. They have beautiful eyes. Black cats have high melanin levels causing their eyes to be golden in colour. 

3. In Japan, it is believed that a woman who owns a black cat will have many suitors. 

4. They always look silky and clean as dirt is camouflaged. 

5. Contrary to popular belief, in many countries black cats are considered good luck. 

6. They match with everything! 

7. They’re fantastic hunters so your rat population will always be under control. 

8. They’re just like Toothless from How to Train Your Dragon. 

Originally posted by moxxii6

9. Black kittens are adorable! 

10. They absolutely deserve to be loved just as much as the next cat! 

  • Client: We are calling to cancel our 2pm appointment. Sniffles is better.
  • Receptionist: Oh, good to hear! Are you sure you don't a doctor to take a look just in case? We close at 4 today.
  • Client: No. He's better.
  • 5 PM
  • Client: HELLO?! We are on our way now. Sniffles has been vomiting all day.
  • Me: I'm so sorry to hear that. Unfortunately we closed at 4 today, I'm alone finishing up paperwork, we aren't seeing appointments. Let me get you the info for the emergency clinic-
  • Client: We have been coming to you for years! I am coming down now.
  • Me: Ma'am. I understand you are worried but there is no staff here. You had an appointment and cancelled and now you need to go to the emergency hospital.
  • Client: I'm in the parking lot. You have to see me!
  • 7 PM
  • Me: ok. The radiographs are done. Everything looks normal.
  • Client: Why did that take so long?!
  • Me: I'm sorry you had to wait, I told you I am here alone so it takes a bit longer.
  • Client: So. Your saying I came for nothing?
  • Me: No ma'am. I'm saying based on my exam, the blood work, and the x-rays Sniffles appears fine. I can give him an anti-emetic and some fluids and-
  • Client: Unreal. Unreal! We came all this way and you can't find anything. He's sick! We're done. Let's go Sniffles.
  • Me: The good news there appears not to be a problem. I'll walk you up to the front and you can pay.
  • Client: 600 dollars?!
  • Me: That is exactly what was on the estimate. I had to charge you an after hours emergency fee plus x-rays and lab work. You signed for it all, see?
  • Client: I didn't know what I was signing! You took advantage of my grief! I refuse to pay. You knew how upset I was. I would have signed anything! You can bill my lawyer!
Please, stop.

“Hey! How are you going? I just have a quick question regarding [insert pets name here].”

“Long time no speak. My dog hasn’t eaten in 6 days and has had vomiting and diarrhoea for 5 of those days. What should I do?”

“Hey, just a quick one but I really want to let my cat have kittens just once so she can experience motherhood, is 8 months too young to let her mate?”,

Please, stop. 

Please, if you have a friend you rarely chat to, a friend of a friend of a friend or an extremely distant acquaintance who is a vet/student/nurse/tech etc, it is really not okay to ask for free advice. It is actually disrespectful.  

Most of us (including myself) are obliging and willing to help because that is the nature of our profession. Though I tell you, if you haven’t bothered to say hey prior to Mitten’s getting into a cat fight at 2am or if you haven’t cared to check in and see how life is going before Charlie started coughing 2 days ago, it is not okay to ask for that free advice.

You usually message us in the middle of a busy day or you message late at night when we are settling in, trying to unwind from a 15 hour hectic day of sick animals and devastated/angry clients. A Facebook message or text pops up from someone we haven’t spoken to in 5-10 years. I get it, you are desperate. Most want to know if they should take their pet to a vet or not. My honest answer is, if you are desperate enough to ask someone you rarely know or haven’t spoken to in a while if you should seek medical attention for your pet, then you more than likely need to. If you are unsure, it is best to call an emergency clinic and ask for advice.

Be mindful. Veterinary medicine already consumes our lives. It bombards us in all aspects of life. I will reply and help as much as I can without physically seeing your animal, but keep in mind that I am most likely replying to you when I am shoveling food into my mouth in the 2 minutes I have spare to eat during a shift or I am in the middle of spending some rare, free time with my loved ones. I will always advise to seek veterinary attention because if you are that concerned to message me, best bet is that your pet requires it.

All we ask is to please be mindful.