versace is the way

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Darren Criss: From a Warbler on 'Glee' to a Killer in 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace'
‘I am up for the challenge. There’s zero anxiety.’

June 23, 2017

By Tim Stack

Ryan Murphy was adamant that Darren Criss — best known for his five seasons on Murphy’s Glee as sweet, bow-tied Blaine — play the Andrew Cunanan, the twisted serial killer in The Assassination of Gianni Versace. A Talented Mr. Ripley-type character, Cunanan charmed his way into wealthy circles before his violent break; he’s far from a one-note monster.

It’s unquestionably the biggest and most challenging role of Criss’ career so far. “Actors are only as good as the parts they get. You can only be as good as those moments you get,” Criss says. “This is one of those ship-coming-in moments where Ryan has really given me this massive opportunity, and I’d like to think I am up for the challenge. There’s zero anxiety.”

It’s a definite about-face from the squeaky clean Blaine, but Criss says he treats all roles with equal intensity. “I don’t like quantifying one [role is] harder or easier or funner or more significant than other characters,” says the 30-year-old. “Blaine, by comparison, could be put into a cartoonish box. The very patter of Glee exists in a different world than the one we’re dealing with. But all the same, I treat that silly hairdo and the clothes he wore and the way that he spoke and the things he believed in with the same currency that I treat someone like Andrew, who was a real person and had real friends and family/”

To sell his creative team on his vision, Murphy sent Smith and executive producer Brad Simpson to see Criss in the touring production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. “Once every night he jumps into somebody’s lap and makes out with them,” says Simpson. “In the middle of the show, he jumps in the audience and rips my glasses off and makes out with me. It was very charming and a very Cunanan thing to do, to be a little devilish. Cunanan charmed people and then turned them off. We’re talking about a serial killer people liked.” Criss jokes: “I casting-couched the s— outta that! In my defense, I didn’t know it was Brad Simpson. I’m glad I didn’t know.”


To read more on The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly on stands Friday

ew.com
Darren Criss: From a Warbler on 'Glee' to a Killer in 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace'
‘I am up for the challenge. There’s zero anxiety.’

Ryan Murphy was adamant that Darren Criss — best known for his five seasons on Murphy’s Glee as sweet, bow-tied Blaine — play the Andrew Cunanan, the twisted serial killer in The Assassination of Gianni Versace. A Talented Mr. Ripley-type character, Cunanan charmed his way into wealthy circles before his violent break; he’s far from a one-note monster.

It’s unquestionably the biggest and most challenging role of Criss’ career so far. “Actors are only as good as the parts they get. You can only be as good as those moments you get,” Criss says. “This is one of those ship-coming-in moments where Ryan has really given me this massive opportunity, and I’d like to think I am up for the challenge. There’s zero anxiety.”

It’s a definite about-face from the squeaky clean Blaine, but Criss says he treats all roles with equal intensity. “I don’t like quantifying one [role is] harder or easier or funner or more significant than other characters,” says the 30-year-old. “Blaine, by comparison, could be put into a cartoonish box. The very patter of Glee exists in a different world than the one we’re dealing with. But all the same, I treat that silly hairdo and the clothes he wore and the way that he spoke and the things he believed in with the same currency that I treat someone like Andrew, who was a real person and had real friends and family.”

To sell his creative team on his vision, Murphy sent Smith and executive producer Brad Simpson to see Criss in the touring production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. “Once every night he jumps into somebody’s lap and makes out with them,” says Simpson. “In the middle of the show, he jumps in the audience and rips my glasses off and makes out with me. It was very charming and a very Cunanan thing to do, to be a little devilish. Cunanan charmed people and then turned them off. We’re talking about a serial killer people liked.” Criss jokes: “I casting-couched the s— outta that! In my defense, I didn’t know it was Brad Simpson. I’m glad I didn’t know.”

ew.com
Darren Criss: From a Warbler on 'Glee' to a Killer in 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace'
‘I am up for the challenge. There’s zero anxiety.’

Ryan Murphy was adamant that Darren Criss — best known for his five seasons on Murphy’s Glee as sweet, bow-tied Blaine — play the Andrew Cunanan, the twisted serial killer inThe Assassination of Gianni Versace. A Talented Mr. Ripley-type character, Cunanan charmed his way into wealthy circles before his violent break; he’s far from a one-note monster.

It’s unquestionably the biggest and most challenging role of Criss’ career so far. “Actors are only as good as the parts they get. You can only be as good as those moments you get,” Criss says. “This is one of those ship-coming-in moments where Ryan has really given me this massive opportunity, and I’d like to think I am up for the challenge. There’s zero anxiety.”

It’s a definite about-face from the squeaky clean Blaine, but Criss says he treats all roles with equal intensity. “I don’t like quantifying one [role is] harder or easier or funner or more significant than other characters,” says the 30-year-old. “Blaine, by comparison, could be put into a cartoonish box. The very patter of Glee exists in a different world than the one we’re dealing with. But all the same, I treat that silly hairdo and the clothes he wore and the way that he spoke and the things he believed in with the same currency that I treat someone like Andrew, who was a real person and had real friends and family.”

To sell his creative team on his vision, Murphy sent Smith and executive producer Brad Simpson to see Criss in the touring production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. “Once every night he jumps into somebody’s lap and makes out with them,” says Simpson. “In the middle of the show, he jumps in the audience and rips my glasses off and makes out with me. It was very charming and a very Cunanan thing to do, to be a little devilish. Cunanan charmed people and then turned them off. We’re talking about a serial killer people liked.” Criss jokes: “I casting-couched the s— outta that! In my defense, I didn’t know it was Brad Simpson. I’m glad I didn’t know.”

ew.com
Trump Gets a 'Bracing Cold Slap' from 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace,' Says Ryan Murphy
To read more on The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story, pick up the new issue of Entertainment Weekly on stands Friday, or buy it here now. Don’t forget to subscribe for more exc…

Ryan Murphy has never been one to shy away from bold storytelling and provocative themes. Last year’s The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, which Murphy executive produced, was about the iconic trial but also delved into issues of racism, sexism, and fame obsession in our culture.

For ACS‘s second installment, The Assassination of Gianni Versace, the TV producer hopes to once again use a crime as a way to explore social issues. In particular, Murphy sees the 1997 murder of the fashion designer as a chance to discuss sexuality and homophobia in the 1990s. “The more I had read about it the more I was startled by the fact that [Versace killer Andrew Cunanan] really was only allowed to get away with it because of homophobia,” says Murphy. “There was this great apathy about it and nobody cared and I think part of that was because it seemed like gay people were disposable in our culture.”

He also believes the current political climate makes Versace‘s themes even more relevant. “I think it does open a discussion and I think it’s the perfect timing based on this president we have,” says Murphy. “One of the reasons I wanted to do this was I felt that Obama was a president who I revered. He was my president. I felt there was so much progress in terms of gay rights and rights for any marginalized group of people. Suddenly, it felt like Trump is inaugurated and the door closed and there’s fear again and they’re trying to take away everything that we fought for for so long. This is a bracing cold slap against the policies that the current government has. We celebrate gay people and gay creativity. So I think it’s the perfect time to put that on.”

There will never be another model group quite like the high priestesses of the runway who launched into stardom during the early nineties. You know their names: Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, et al. It was a different time for fashion.

A model did not require tens of thousands of social media followers to be booked by a major agency. Bloggers did not exist. Photographs were taken with film cameras. There was no immediacy: No Instagram. No Style.com. No Snapchat. The act of publishing images from the runways was something left to print newspapers and glossy magazines — not to the Internet — and rarely was a photographer granted access backstage.

But in 1991, British Vogue and L’Officiel hired fashion photographer Donna DeMari to photograph The Supermodels backstage during the haute couture shows in Paris. “I had a basic camera and a few roles of film,” says DeMari. “It was a really rare moment; [back then] it wasn’t cool to be backstage.”

From Versace to Chanel to Lacroix, DeMari made her way backstage, working with available light and fleeting moments to capture images of the women who are now fashion legends in an environment seldom seen by the public. “I was totally free to walk around and shoot what was available,” says DeMari. “It was a way these models weren’t ever photographed.”

The result is a collection of photographs that capture a rare period of fashion, when the notion of the catwalk was seemingly untouchable by the masses in the way it is now. In stark contrast to the images on the magazine covers they graced, DeMari’s photographs depict the era’s top supermodels in ephemeral moments: having makeup done; being fitted in clothes; caught in a moment of laughter.


anonymous asked:

Omg pleasse write the Versace fic

For you anon, ANYTHING. (And also for garnetquyen, of course!!!)

BASED ON THIS POST:

There are some things in life that, once seen, cannot be forgotten. That are etched indelibly into the mind like a burning brand. They change everything. There are some things that fundamentally and irrevocably shift your world view, that make you wonder what life was like before you were burdened with this knowledge, this undeniable truth.

For Charles, that undeniable truth is the exact size and shape of Erik “Versace” Lehnsherr’s cock.

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