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…lindo y querido si muero lejos de ti, que digan que estoy dormido y que me traigan aquí.

Photojournalist Rubén Espinoza, 4 Others, Killed in Mexico City

Mexican photojournalist Rubén Espinosa thought he’d be safe in Mexico City. He feared for his life in Veracruz, felt Governor Javier Duarte was out to get him.

Today, Rubén is dead. His captors bound his hands, torturing him before shooting him twice, reports said. His body, along with those of four of his friends, were found dead in a colonia Narvarte apartment late Friday night. Friends and colleagues of Espinosa hold the governor of Veracruz responsible.

Espinosa is the 13th Veracruza-based journalist to be killed under Duarte’s four years as governor. Let us not forget Rubén and other Mexican journalists killed by those fearful of the truth. Justice for Rubén!

Anthropologist Nadia Vera’s body was found on Friday, July 31, together with those of other three women and photojournalist Rubén Espinosa, 31, in an apartment in Mexico City. Vera’s body showed signs of “a gunshot wound to the head and multiple abrasions.” Both Espinosa and Vera were well known in Veracruz for publicly denouncing the violence and out-of-control impunity in the city, especially after 2010, when Javier Duarte de Ochoa took the reins of the state government.

Mexico: “We Are the Problem Because We Disturb the Government and the Narcos”

La Gordita

An Early Formative (3250-2700 B.P.) Olmec figure found at La Joya, Veracruz.

“La Gordita,” was recovered from an Early Formative pit feature
in association with a radiocarbon date of 2950 ± 50 b.p. (AA
32679). La Gordita has very distinctive modeled and applique
facial features that do not conform to any of the groups discussed
above; nonetheless, there is no indication that these features constitute
a mask. The figurine has a corpulent body with a prominently
rounded chest and a large, distended belly, possibly indicating pregnancy.
La Gordita is seated with legs straight out and crossed at the
ankles, and wears a wide, low-slung belt and a skirt. The left arm
rests across the stomach, while the right hand is turned palmupwards
and cupped below and slightly in front of the chin. The
hair has been wrapped around the head in a turban-like manner
and a long ponytail/braid falls down the nape of the neck onto
the back. The figure carries evidence of red hematite paint, primarily
about the face. Although not an exact replica, La Gordita resembles
a solid female figurine reported from Chicharras phase (3200–3100
b.p.) San Lorenzo.

Phillip J. Arnold and Billie J. A. Follensbee

Early Formative Anthropomorphic Figurines from La Joya, Southern Veracruz, Mexico. Ancient Mesoamerica. 26(1): 13-28.