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nadineyoussef4321  asked:

Hey I keep seeing throughout your blog something about stories that you did? I'm not sure what they are but I'm hella interested so can you please give me a bit of info on what they're about and where I could possibly read them? Thanks and have a great day!

Oh, Turncoat? It’s my Fallout 4 story! 

Tumblr - All my stuff, including chapters and art!

AO3 - Easier reading format, also comments and suggestions!


“Working for the Railroad isn’t all it’s cracked up to be - especially when the Brotherhood’s got a bounty on you and the Institute’s got your number. Turner finds a friend in a disgruntled detective that might have taken on a case too big for his britches, and the two of them fall into a plot that might just be more than enough for the both of them.” 

It’s a story about my character, Ridley Turner, an ex-Brotherhood knight who ventured up from the Capital Wasteland to the Commonwealth. 

Events transpire that lead to her leaving their ranks and joining the Railroad, wherein she meets Nick Valentine. But under the orders of Elder Maxson, Paladin Riddik has made it their goal to see Turner sentenced for treason. 

But Riddik’s madness begins to take hold, and their goal is no longer to simply take Turner in – they want to see her suffer the consequences of her betrayal.

I’m almost done with Turncoat, too! I already have a sequel planned, Call of Far Harbor, where I plan to use Creepy!DiMA to his full potential! 

4

App-Hungry in India                                          

When Harsh Vardhan Mandad and his Mumbai flat-mates brainstormed ideas for the next killer app, they fueled the sessions with late-night deliveries of local fare. The curry rice and spicy wraps inspired their big breakthrough.

They started Tiny Owl, a smartphone application that helps hungry city-dwellers scour nearby eateries for deliveries. The service now handles 2,000 orders each day and has caught the interest of venture funds including Sequoia Capital, an early backer of technology giants such as Apple Inc. and Oracle Corp.

India is becoming the land of the errand app. A growing number of startups cater to people who want to avoid the poor roads and polluted air, and can afford to do so because of the plentiful cheap labor. Almost anyone can use an app to have someone pick up groceries, drop off a letter at the post office or prepare a lunch that runs 75 rupees ($1.20) with delivery.

Read more in the Bloomberg Business story by Adi Narayan. 

Photographer: Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg

© 2015 Bloomberg Finance LP

Tumblr doesn’t want to please you.

When you consider the latest highly annoying changes to Tumblr, never forget that they aren’t meant for you.   Yahoo, Tumblr’s owner, is under a lot of pressure to make some money. That means that Tumblr has to either pull its weight or be shut down.  In the Web-ancient adage, “If you aren’t the customer, you’re the product.”  That is, if you aren’t directly paying for any Website, then the Website is selling you, in the form of advertising.  Tumblr desperately needs to monetize you.   To monetize you, they need to know your  personal demographics, so that they can sell groups of similar users to advertisers.

In that light, think about the recent changes to tag search.  If you have a tracked tag for your best friend’s name, that isn’t monetizable;  there aren’t enough people following that tag to be useful to an advertiser.  Suppose instead you have a tracked tag that does more-or-less map to a demographic, or to a customer base.  Let’s say you’re following “loligoth”.  When you click through that tag, you immediately get a set of posts customized to your interest and – this is important – your eye can easily slide over ads to the good bits. Injecting ads into that tracked tag gets you a lot of “impressions” (views) but not many click-throughs or conversions, where the advertising money is.  Suppose advertisers attempt to monetize that demographic, guessing, for instance, that most lolitas will be late teenagers and twenty-something girls with disposable income and injecting ads accordingly. Click-throughs don’t go up, because loligoths will immediately reject ads for anything other than Lolita brands.  You, the product, have a finely-developed anti-ad immune system.  Advertisers can’t inject  – stereotyping here – an ad for lipstick into a Lolita tag, because it’s obviously a foreign body and is easy for products to reject.

You can’t monetize tracked tags.  Consider what Tumblr is giving us instead.  It is, as you’ve no doubt noticed, not a coincidence that Tumblr’s example is a merchandisable product.  Who wants the latest news on pizza?  Customers don’t.  Pizza sellers sure do want those customers, though.   Tracked search has some important advantages over tracked tags.  It appears randomly, so that you are likely to read a few lines before you realize what has happened.   It camouflages into your normal feed, because your interests are likely to be broader than your individual tags, and clever ads (fat chance) are less obviously out of place.   And it is monetizable not by inference from a single tag, but based on your entire set of interests.  "Likes Lolita, Crimson Peak, and college", plus any explicit age, sex, location data you’ve put in your profile, tells the advertiser a lot more than “Likes Lolita”, and is thus more monetizable.

Finally, Tumblr is under pressure not only to monetize the audience it has, but to grow that audience.  Tumblr already has you.  Tumblr knows how to get you and your friends.  Tumblr wants your uncle who uses Pinterest, your friend’s mom who uses Facebook, and your boss who uses LinkedIn.  You can expect any new features to be designed to hook those people.

Doubt me?  Look at Twitter.  Twitter just cut 8% of their jobs.  The business analysis I’ve read points to two factors:  Twitter’s audience isn’t increasing enough, and Twitter’s attempts at monetization aren’t successful enough.   If you think Marissa Meyer, head of Yahoo, isn’t evaluating Tumblr against those two metrics, I have a slice of pizza to sell you.

When we first started with app idea it was more focused on travel and the ability to meet people abroad. As we massaged the idea and kept working it we took it to a whole direction and I believe much better. 

A key in business is flexibility you must be always able to adapt on the move. To many business use the saying “we are a big boat, it takes a while to change”. Being in  the tech age, everything changes quick. You either sink or swim. 

Back to our app…

It shares about 10% of the original idea. Now it is much more scalable and have a bigger audience. Users should need to leave our app to gather any other info or transact on another platform. I want it to be an efficient on stop app for users. Easy, enjoyable and efficient.

It is important to ink out all the details before you get into UX design.  

4

Sheryl Sandberg: ‘As A Woman Gets More Successful.. She Is Less Liked’

Ellen Pao’s high-profile gender discrimination lawsuit has resonated with women across Silicon Valley and beyond – including Sheryl Sandberg.

In a recent interview with Virgin Group founder Richard Branson and Bloomberg, the Facebook executive said she saw many of her own experiences reflected in Pao’s case against venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Watch the full interview for more on women in tech from Sheryl Sandberg and RIchard Branson. 

An investor in Twitter, Slack and Tumblr explains the power of 'goosebumps'

(Spark Capital General Partner Bijan SabetSpark Capital)
For the last 11 years or so, Spark Capital has found success by investing in some of the hottest consumer technology startups around: Yahoo’s Tumblr, Facebook’s Oculus, Twitter, and Warby Parker are all Spark investments.

Now, says Spark Capital cofounder and General Partner Bijan Sabet, the firm is starting to turn its attention towards a new target — the rising tide of workplace apps that make work just a little bit more fun.

And Spark had a big victory in this regard just recently: Trello, a beloved work organization app with 19 million users, sold to Aussie software giant Atlassian for $425 million, after raising a relatively modest $10.34 million in venture capital in its lifespan. For Sabet, who sat on Trello’s board from its early days, it was a personal victory, too. 

Plus, Spark is also an investor in Slack, the $3.8 billion chat app that recently staked its claim to the Fortune 500-grade software market with Slack Enterprise Grid, a new product intended for larger teams. 

Here’s why Sabet thinks there’s a huge “acceleration” in the market for startups that have more to do with your work life than your personal life — and why Spark is putting its money where its mouth is after years of having it the other way around.

‘Goosebumps’

Historically, Sabet says, Spark’s interest has really been in companies that combine cutting-edge technology with good design, because those are the products that people actually enjoy using. So it wasn’t exactly that Spark was avoiding business software companies, Sabet says. It’s that, historically, it was hard to find any that fit their criteria.

Trello was an early exception, but he says that even popular enterprise software like Salesforce is “not a very inspiring product.” When Sabet looked at Salesforce for the first time, he says, “we didn’t get goosebumps like we did when we saw Tumblr." 

(Trello helps users organize their projects by moving virtual post-it notes around on a whiteboard.Trello)
Furthermore, Sabet says, the way that business software was historically sold created "natural gatekeepers” — the IT department dictated what hardware and software could be used by employees, meaning that there weren’t a lot of ways that even the scrappiest startup could compete. 

There wasn’t an easy way to try business software before you buy, Sabet says; we may be used to lots of web-based productivity tools having free-to-use services now, but that wasn’t always the case.

“You literally had to take a meeting before you could get a trial version,” Sabet says.

David vs. Goliath

The thing that changed, Sabet says, is the rise of Apple and the app economy. Suddenly, people were allowed and encouraged to bring iPhones and Android phones to work. And with that latitude came the opportunity for employees to figure out the best tools they need to get stuff done, choosing apps and services “naturally." 

This was "liberating,” Sabet says, because it meant that suddenly, those “gatekeepers” were listed. Companies could sell straight to their users, not the IT department. If a small team at a company uses Slack, and their coworkers see them, they’re going to want to use Slack, too.

It’s the same network effect that powers the growth of social networks like Snapchat or Facebook, Sabet says, and now it’s starting to hit the workplace, too. And the really great companies, including Spark portfolio companies Trello and Slack, are the ones who are applying a similar relentless focus on the user.

(SlackSlack)

“We’re seeing very creative founders,” Sabet says. “They can actually innovate here." 

Indeed, Sabet says, it’s a "red flag” when startups come to Spark with a business model that’s a little more old-fashioned, with revenue that comes from selling professional services like setup, installation, and training. The companies that he’s most interested in are the ones that can grow in that new, direct-to-user kind of way.

And while Slack and Trello found success by focusing on a broad set of office workers, Sabet says that there’s room for other companies, like Mark43 — a Spark-funded tool for law enforcement officers — to find similar success in different industries.

As for fears that companies like Microsoft and Amazon could crush these work-focused startups with their own ever-growing rosters of apps and services, well, Sabet isn’t worried.

“We’re kind of big on David vs. Goliath here,” he says.

NOW WATCH: Stewart Butterfield, co-founder of Slack and Flickr, on two beliefs that have brought him the greatest success in life



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The premise of Apple’s upcoming TV show, Planet of the Apps, has been known for awhile now: app makers will pitch their iOS app ideas for a $10 million pot of venture capital funding, some mentorship, and the chance to have their apps seen by millions of Apple TV users. Turns out there’s an actual elevator pitch involved — although it’s not an elevator, it’s an escalator, as the first trailer for Planet of the Apps shows. Apple is launching its first TV show, “Planet of the Apps.” Here’s the trailer. Read more
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How Denver became an unexpected start up mecca

Denver has quietly become one of the fastest-growing startup meccas in the United States. In 2015, Denver startups attracted more than $822 million in venture capital funding, with companies in the technology, energy, food and marijuana sectors leading the way. The city also routinely ranks as one of the best cities to live as a millennial, and young people from across America are flocking to the state in record numbers to build Denver-based business. Why it’s great for women and minority entrepreneurs.

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A little-known startup that has quietly amassed 100,000 Wall Street users just scored a big investment

(Dealers work on the trading floor of BGC Partners in the Canary Wharf financial district in east London.REUTERS/Toby Melville)
  • OpenFin, a startup that helps electronic-trading firms build their desktop applications, has raised $15 million in funding.
  • Backers include JPMorgan, the high-speed trading firm DRW, and the venture capital firm Euclid Opportunities.
  • The firm wants to become what iOS and Android are to the mobile application world.

You might have heard of the high-speed market-maker Citadel Securities or the interdealer broker TP ICAP. Then there’s TruMid, the bond-trading platform backed by George Soros and Peter Thiel, and the Treasury-trading startup OpenDoor.

One little-known firm connects them all — and many more Wall Street trading firms — behind the scenes: OpenFin. Now the startup, which helps electronic-trading firms build their desktop applications, is getting its moment in the spotlight.

The firm has raised $15 million in a Series B fundraising round from investors including JPMorgan, the fintech backer Euclid Opportunities, and the high-speed trading firm DRW. Bain Capital Ventures, Pivot Investment Partners, and Nyca Partners have already invested in the firm, as have the likes of Cris Conde, former CEO of SunGard, and Tom Glocer, former CEO of Thomson Reuters.

(Andrew Burton / Getty Images)
The vision, according to OpenFin CEO Mazy Dar, a former chief strategy officer at Creditex, is to become to Wall Street what iOS and Android are to the mobile application world.

“When you have the iOS layer, and Android, that is the layer that enables developers to know what they are building their app in,” Dar said. That’s what OpenFin aims to become.

The firm already has 35 investment banks and trading firms signed up, according to Dar, and it powers applications licensed on over 100,000 desktops. He said the firm has been increasing revenue 100% year-over-year for the past few years and is close to being cash flow positive. The $15 million investment will enable the firm to expand — Dar plans to double headcount from 25 in New York and London currently to 50 within a year.

The aim is to become “the industrywide operating layer,” he said. Right now, OpenFin is typically delivered to a desktop together with an application that runs on it. The hope is that, in time, OpenFin will be on the desktop independent of any application, becoming a kind of finance application ecosystem of its own.

“OpenFin enabled us to reach hundreds of client desktops instantly with an operating layer already vetted by many major banks and financial institutions,” said Tony Schiavo, chief technology officer at TruMid.

There are three key pillars to OpenFin’s strategy. The first is to have apps that can be downloaded and updated easily — the same way you would download apps on your phone — and then have them update regularly.

Then there’s the layer of security, a key issue for any Wall Street institution. Finally, there is interoperability, or letting the apps talk to one another — the same way social media apps connect on your phone.

“We’re in a world where apps are siloed and by and large do not talk to one another,” Dar said. “The human sitting in front of the six monitors is the integration layer. With OpenFin, they are now able to talk to one another, share data and contacts.”

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A little-known startup that has quietly amassed 100,000 Wall Street users just scored a big investment

(Dealers work on the trading floor of BGC Partners in the Canary Wharf financial district in east London.REUTERS/Toby Melville)
  • OpenFin, a startup that helps electronic-trading firms build their desktop applications, has raised $15 million in funding.
  • Backers include JPMorgan, the high-speed trading firm DRW, and the venture capital firm Euclid Opportunities.
  • The firm wants to become what iOS and Android are to the mobile application world.

You might have heard of high-speed market maker Citadel Securities, or interdealer broker Tullett Prebon Icap. Then there is TruMid, the bond trading platform backed by George Soros and Peter Thiel, and Treasury trading startup OpenDoor. 

Well, there’s one little-known firm that connects them all, and many more Wall Street trading firms, behind the scenes: OpenFin. Now, the startup, which helps electronic trading firms build their desktop applications, is getting its own moment in the spotlight.

The firm has raised $15 million in a Series B fundraising round from investors including JPMorgan, fintech backer Euclid Opportunities and high-speed trading firm DRW. Bain Capital Ventures, Pivot Investment Partners and Nyca Partners have already invested in the firm, as have the likes of Chris Conde, former CEO of Sungard, and Tom Glocer, former CEO of Thomson Reuters.

(Andrew Burton / Getty Images)
The vision, according to CEO Mazy Dar, a former chief strategy officer at Creditex, is to become to Wall Street what iOS and Android is to the mobile application world. 

“When you have the iOS layer, and Android, that is the layer that enables developers to know what they are building their app in,” Dar said. That’s what OpenFin is aiming to become. 

The firm already has 35 investment banks and trading firms signed up, according to Dar, and powers applications licensed on over 100,000 desktops. He said the firm has been growing revenue 100% year-over-year for the past few years, and is close to being cash flow positive. The $15 million investment will enable the firm to expand, with Dar planning to double headcount from 25 in New York and London currently to 50 in 12 months time. 

The aim is to become “the industry wide operating layer,” he said. Right now, OpenFin is typically delivered to a desktop together with an application that runs on it. The hope is that, in time, OpenFin will be on the desktop independent of any application, becoming a kind of finance application ecosystem all of its own. 

“OpenFin enabled us to reach hundreds of client desktops instantly with an operating layer already vetted by many major banks and financial institutions," Tony Schiavo, chief technology officer at Trumid, said.

There are three key pillars to this strategy. First, having apps that can be downloaded and updated with ease, the same way you would download an app on your phone, and then have it update regularly. 

Then there is the layer of security, a key issue for any Wall Street institution. Finally, there is interoperability, or letting the apps talk to one another, the same way social media apps connect on your phone.  

"We’re in a world where apps are siloed, and by and large do not talk to one another,” Dar said. “The human sitting in front of the six monitors is the integration layer. With OpenFin, they are now able to talk to one another, share data and contacts.”

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The 10 things in advertising you need to know today

(NFL commissioner Roger Goodell congratulates Tom Brady after Super Bowl 51 that concluded the 2016 NFL season.Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Good morning. Here’s everything you need to know in the world of advertising today.

1. Verizon has reportedly revised its deal to acquire Yahoo. The new deal cuts the $4.8 billion acquisition price by $250 million. The carrier reconsidered the deal following Yahoo’s announcement that 1 billion account credentials had been stolen as far back as 2013.

2. Early investors in Facebook and Twitter believe Snapchat could make nearly $15 billion in revenue. Venture capitalists from Goodwater Capital wrote an analysis of the social network and believe it could grow its overall gross revenue from $404 million in 2016 to $14.8 billion by 2027.

3. The NFL and CBS want to speed up football games. High-level executives from the football league and TV channel met to discuss how to speed up the games, following a season of slumping ratings.

4. Under Armour’s CEO bought a full page newspaper ad to explain his comments on President Trump. CEO Kevin Plank previously praised the US President as “an asset,” angering fans and some of the star athletes the brand sponsors.

5. German privacy browser Cliqz acquired the tracking blocker Ghostery. The German startup will merge the browser plugin’s technology to identify web trackers with its own as it plans to expand globally.

6. Budget supermarket chain Lidl is expanding into the United States. The German grocery store wants to open 100 stores on the East Coast by 2018.

7. Goldman Sachs is investing $95 million in advertising group MDC Partners. The group – which owns a number of creative agencies including 72&Sunny, Doner and CP+B – was fighting off a potential sale last year.

8. Facebook will let companies post job listings. The new feature, which rolled out yesterday, will allow firms to pay to boost their posts, pitting the social network against LinkedIn and Glassdoor.

9. Yahoo is telling its users hackers may have logged into their accounts. A forged cookie may have allowed hackers to access accounts without needing a password.

10. Awesomeness TV wants to up its political coverage. Brian Robbins, CEO of the YouTube video network, said President Trump is creating an appetite for politics content among younger audiences.

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Will Smell Ever Come to Smartphones?

Leaving aside the inglorious examples of Smell-O-Vision and other attempts to project odor in a cinematic context, the past quarter century of e-smell enterprises forms a litany of failure. In 1999, for instance, the DigiScents iSmell, a USB-connected scent synthesizer, elicited twenty million dollars in venture-capital funding and was heralded by Wired magazine as the beginning of a “Web revolution.” By 2001, the company had gone out of business. (The iSmell has since been named one of PC World’s “25 Worst Tech Products of All Time.”)

Undaunted, this company has just launched a “digital scent speaker.” Read more from Nicola Twilley